DME Vs LME - Home Brew Forums

Register Now!
Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Extract Brewing > DME Vs LME

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 03-22-2010, 06:23 PM   #1
seabrew8
Recipes 
 
Mar 2010
Newfoundland, Canada
Posts: 613
Liked 70 Times on 59 Posts



What are the pros and cons. I just looked at the Country Malt Groups price list and LME is a nice bit cheaper.

Ok i found this link:

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f39/vs-p...alysis-109318/

So if i bought a 50lb pail how do i store LME?


 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2010, 06:50 PM   #2
mosquitocontrol
Recipes 
 
Sep 2008
Denver, CO
Posts: 1,082
Liked 9 Times on 9 Posts


-DME stays fresher longer, as long as you hav ein cool humidity free environment. LME can get moldy and will lose freshness over time. Depending upon where you buy LME it may not be the freshest already.
-DME (unless you buy in bulk) is more expensive then LME
- LME seems to have more "flavors" readily available. Munich, Amber, Dark, Wheat, etc. Sometimes this can help you achieve characteristics in extract that you would otherwise need to do partial mash to get.
-DME takes some patience to mix in.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2010, 07:33 PM   #3
Homercidal
Licensed Sensual Massage Therapist.
HBT_MODERATOR.png
 
Homercidal's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Feb 2008
Reed City, MI
Posts: 30,897
Liked 4855 Times on 3272 Posts


DME will keep on the shelf and is re-packaged much easier than LME.

DME is generally lighter in color than LME I think.
__________________
Day after day, it reappears. Night after night my heartbeat shows the fear. Ghosts appear and fade away. Come back another day.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2010, 07:53 PM   #4
starrfish
 
starrfish's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Oct 2008
Florence, SC
Posts: 1,984
Liked 32 Times on 26 Posts


1lb DME = .8lb LME. You need more LME to get the same amount of DME.

LME usually ends up darker than DME

I found I've needed to heat Cans of LME to get them to pour easily

Can easily save 1 & 1/4 cups from ingredient list, in a zip lock bag, to carbonate bottles

I've found LME to be a pain and only use dry. (I also only use the light color, and color/flavor with steeping or mashing specialty malts)
__________________
Yankee Sand Flea on a Southern Beach.

“Son, you are a walking violation of the laws of nature, but you’re lucky, we don't enforce them laws.”


 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-22-2010, 08:31 PM   #5
SumnerH
Recipes 
 
Feb 2009
Alexandria, VA, USA
Posts: 2,057
Liked 30 Times on 26 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by starrfish View Post
1lb DME = .8lb LME. You need more LME to get the same amount of DME.

LME usually ends up darker than DME

I found I've needed to heat Cans of LME to get them to pour easily

Can easily save 1 & 1/4 cups from ingredient list, in a zip lock bag, to carbonate bottles

I've found LME to be a pain and only use dry. (I also only use the light color, and color/flavor with steeping or mashing specialty malts)
I agree with everything here. I've gotten to the point where I only use Pilsen DME (same brand every time, for consistency) and build my grain bill to fit that with specialty grains/partial mashes. Deathbrewer's stovetop partial mash instructions are great; it's not really any harder than using specialty grains once you learn temperature control.

DME is much easier to work with for me, and I've gotten much lighter-colored beers with it. Mostly, though, it's more consistent (LME varies dramatically with not much age) so makes recipe formulation more accurate.
__________________
On deck: Little Bo Pils, Bretta Off Dead (Brett pale)
Secondary: Oude Bruin, Red Sky at Morning (Sour brown ale)
On tap: Saison Duphunk (sour), Amarillo Slim (IPA), Earl White (ginger/bergamot wit)
Bottled: Number 8 (Belgian Strong Dark Ale), Eternale (Barleywine), Ancho Villa (Ancho/pasilla/chocolate/cinnamon RIS), Oak smoked porter (1/2 maple bourbon oaked, 1/2 apple brandy oaked)

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2010, 09:38 PM   #6
starrfish
 
starrfish's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Oct 2008
Florence, SC
Posts: 1,984
Liked 32 Times on 26 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by SumnerH View Post
I agree with everything here. I've gotten to the point where I only use Pilsen DME (same brand every time, for consistency) and build my grain bill to fit that with specialty grains/partial mashes. Deathbrewer's stovetop partial mash instructions are great; it's not really any harder than using specialty grains once you learn temperature control.

DME is much easier to work with for me, and I've gotten much lighter-colored beers with it. Mostly, though, it's more consistent (LME varies dramatically with not much age) so makes recipe formulation more accurate.

I use Munton & Fision light DME (or extra light for really light beers). Been using that brand for years with very consistent results. doing a SMASH this week using M&F extract and 2-row with Simcoe Hops

I've also gone to a late addition of the DME.
just wish they had a marris otter DME! that would be awesome!
__________________
Yankee Sand Flea on a Southern Beach.

“Son, you are a walking violation of the laws of nature, but you’re lucky, we don't enforce them laws.”

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-23-2010, 09:47 PM   #7
SumnerH
Recipes 
 
Feb 2009
Alexandria, VA, USA
Posts: 2,057
Liked 30 Times on 26 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by starrfish View Post
I use Munton & Fision light DME (or extra light for really light beers). Been using that brand for years with very consistent results. doing a SMASH this week using M&F extract and 2-row with Simcoe Hops

I've also gone to a late addition of the DME.
just wish they had a marris otter DME! that would be awesome!
I'm in the US so I settled on Breiss pilsen DME for everything. I don't switch to light; I always go with the lightest DME and layer grains on top of that.

For instance, my British IPA is a couple of pounds of Marris Otter, 1/2 pound of Belgian biscuit, and 7 pounds of pilsen DME.

And yeah, late-addition in every beer (1/3 or so of the DME up front, the rest at the end).
__________________
On deck: Little Bo Pils, Bretta Off Dead (Brett pale)
Secondary: Oude Bruin, Red Sky at Morning (Sour brown ale)
On tap: Saison Duphunk (sour), Amarillo Slim (IPA), Earl White (ginger/bergamot wit)
Bottled: Number 8 (Belgian Strong Dark Ale), Eternale (Barleywine), Ancho Villa (Ancho/pasilla/chocolate/cinnamon RIS), Oak smoked porter (1/2 maple bourbon oaked, 1/2 apple brandy oaked)

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2010, 04:03 AM   #8
homebrewer_99
 
homebrewer_99's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Feb 2005
Atkinson (near the Quad Cities), IL
Posts: 17,792
Liked 132 Times on 99 Posts


The trick to mixing in DME is to pour it in about 1 pound at a time until it's dissolved before adding more.

For my partial mash's Munton's Extra Light DME is my base malt.
__________________
HB Bill

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-24-2010, 03:44 PM   #9
lx302
Recipes 
 
Nov 2008
Bethlehem PA
Posts: 101
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts


Been extract brewing for 3 years now, and switched to strickly DME. I found it easier to use for the reasons stated above.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-14-2011, 08:25 PM   #10
pjcampbell
Recipes 
 
Jun 2010
Fayston, VT
Posts: 201
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts


Why do sites like breworganic pitch LME if DME seems to be better for most users?

I used LME and had bad results. My best results are with DME so fast, but I have not tried a late LME addition. I would say that LME is a little easier to deal with in pouring and mixing versus the clumping of DME.

At 60# for LME vs 50# for DME, LME is 15$ cheaper. LME also comes with a food grade bucket which probably has a value of at least $5.

 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools



Forum Jump