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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Gluten Free Brewing > Flaked maize/corn in extract
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Old 03-19-2010, 05:27 PM   #1
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Default Flaked maize/corn in extract

I'm wondering about the possibility of using flaked maize in a GF extract brew, specifically using it like a specialty grain.

I found some information about using flaked maize in certain types of non-GF beer, but they recommend using some malted barley mixed in to help convert the starches.

I have 2 thoughts here: one would be use a little bit of flaked maize when I make a wit, in the hopes that the starches would leave a little bit of haze, making it 'look' like a wheat beer.

The second thought is, are there any enzymes left in rice syrup after processing, so that if I mix rice syrup in my water, THEN steep the maize, it would perform some conversion?


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Old 03-19-2010, 08:07 PM   #2
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GF grains are really light on the enzymes used for conversion. Part of the reason that rice and corn are considered to be adjuncts (as are most GF grains) is that they don't contribute any enzymes to help convert the starches. Additionally you often have to boil the adjuncts for about 30 minutes to break up the gelatin to release the starch. About the only grain that produces enough enzymes is sorghum, and even then it's just a fraction of what barley can make.

If you want more protein haze to resemble a wheat beer, then try grinding up some of that quinoa that you just got or finding some millet and using it in there.

I really doubt that corn flakes will contribute to much in the way of flavor in your beer, and they likely have little to no protein, so they won't make any sort of haze either.

Then again, I could be wrong and you could hold the keys to perfect GF beer.


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Old 03-19-2010, 08:42 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by aggieotis View Post
GF grains are really light on the enzymes used for conversion. Part of the reason that rice and corn are considered to be adjuncts (as are most GF grains) is that they don't contribute any enzymes to help convert the starches. Additionally you often have to boil the adjuncts for about 30 minutes to break up the gelatin to release the starch. About the only grain that produces enough enzymes is sorghum, and even then it's just a fraction of what barley can make.

If you want more protein haze to resemble a wheat beer, then try grinding up some of that quinoa that you just got or finding some millet and using it in there.

I really doubt that corn flakes will contribute to much in the way of flavor in your beer, and they likely have little to no protein, so they won't make any sort of haze either.

Then again, I could be wrong and you could hold the keys to perfect GF beer.
The quinoa, millet, or buckwheat are all possibilities (I'll use the buckwheat or millet first, that quinoa is expensive!).

I was sort of thinking that there wouldn't be enough enzymes in any GF extracts to convert the corn, but the idea of starch haze was based on one of the posts I found when I searched, saying that if you didn't put some barley in with the flaked maize when you steeped it, all you would end up with is some starch haze in the beer.

What, if anything, would unconverted starches contribute to beer? Will any of the starches get broken down by the yeast? Just some mouthfeel and maybe starchy taste?
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Old 03-19-2010, 09:40 PM   #4
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Flaked Corn or Maize definitely won't cloud up a beer, they are primarily used in cream ales and american lite lagers, which both are very clear.

I have thought of using them too, but can't figure out if they are actually gluten free. If they are, tossing em in with some amylase would be a great addition to one of our beers, making it lighter and having one more option to replace sorghum with.
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Old 03-19-2010, 09:51 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by dkershner View Post
Flaked Corn or Maize definitely won't cloud up a beer, they are primarily used in cream ales and american lite lagers, which both are very clear.

I have thought of using them too, but can't figure out if they are actually gluten free. If they are, tossing em in with some amylase would be a great addition to one of our beers, making it lighter and having one more option to replace sorghum with.
Are you thinking there is something in the 'flaking' process that is an issue, or corn in general?

I would be wary of anything like cornflake cereal, and of course there is always the issue of cross-contamination.

I do know that some people refer to 'corn gluten' but that is just an overly generic term for grain protein being applied...
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Old 03-19-2010, 10:36 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dorklord View Post
Are you thinking there is something in the 'flaking' process that is an issue, or corn in general?

I would be wary of anything like cornflake cereal, and of course there is always the issue of cross-contamination.

I do know that some people refer to 'corn gluten' but that is just an overly generic term for grain protein being applied...
Yeah, guess I should've been more specific.

For example, Briess makes grain. They make flaked grain. They also make gluten free syrup. Why wouldn't the flaked corn be in the 'gluten-free brewing' section if it was gluten free? Like I said, I haven't bothered to check yet.

I assume if it's not, it is just because they make it on the same machine that makes torrified wheat and flaked barley.
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Old 03-21-2010, 05:06 PM   #7
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The quinoa, millet, or buckwheat are all possibilities (I'll use the buckwheat or millet first, that quinoa is expensive!).
Quinoa is cheap compared to amaranth or teff.

If you're looking for a gluten free, flaked substitute, go for a "puffed" cereal. I haven't used any of it in beer, but I buy puffed corn and millet all the time.
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Old 03-22-2010, 01:19 AM   #8
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Buy some amylase enzyme. It's cheap, GF and will let you use just about any GF grain in your beer.
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Old 03-22-2010, 02:00 AM   #9
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Buy some amylase enzyme. It's cheap, GF and will let you use just about any GF grain in your beer.
I assume that's getting into all-grain territory? Or is is possible to steep grains, with some amylase in the water?
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Old 03-22-2010, 02:33 AM   #10
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Or is is possible to steep grains, with some amylase in the water?
Yes, works fine.


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