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Old 03-19-2010, 12:42 PM   #1
petep1980
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Making my Baltic Porter in my new system, I ended up mashing at 160F, I wanted full body. I pitched enough yeast I know, and my fermentation started at 1.072 and ended at 1.024. That seems a bit on the high side, but I heard the higher the mash temp, the less attenuation you'll get.

My previous Baltic's have ended at 1.020, so the 1.024 doesn't really bother me. I'm just curious if the mash temp could affect that? And if I wanted to drop the next batch down to 1.020, should I just lower my mash temp to 156?

 
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Old 03-19-2010, 12:58 PM   #2
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http://www.howtobrew.com/section3/chapter14-5.html
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A higher mash temperature, greater than or equal to 156F, yields a less fermentable, sweeter beer.

 
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Old 03-19-2010, 01:01 PM   #3
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Mashing at 160F would lead to very little beta amylase enzymes activation, which would in turn allow some longer chains to remain intact, leading to less fermentables, I like the way Palmer explains it here: http://www.howtobrew.com/section3/chapter14-1.html

Keep on brewing my friend

 
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Old 03-19-2010, 01:01 PM   #4
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Get some good brewing software and you won't be surprised at the results when you do something like this. You plug in the actual temps and it'll let you know the expected gravities based upon types of yeast and their expected attenuation etc...

 
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Old 03-19-2010, 01:03 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drat View Post
Get some good brewing software and you won't be surprised at the results when you do something like this. You plug in the actual temps and it'll let you know the expected gravities based upon types of yeast and their expected attenuation etc...
I just have Beersmith. Which software is good? I'd like something like that.

When I took temp at mash in it said 158F, I must have had a slightly cooler spot somehow, because at mash out it was 160F.

 
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Old 03-19-2010, 01:21 PM   #6
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what brew software adjusts attenuation for mash temp?

beersmith just goes by average attenuation in the yeast you select.

 
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Old 03-19-2010, 01:40 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by motobrewer View Post
what brew software adjusts attenuation for mash temp?

beersmith just goes by average attenuation in the yeast you select.
I've wondered that too. I imagine it may be too difficult to accurately predict a parameter such as that. Ferment temp, pitching rates, oxygen, etc.. all affect the final gravity as well.
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Old 03-19-2010, 02:15 PM   #8
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Most software that I've looked at show the expected attenuation of the more popular yeast varieties. The temperature adjustment I was referring to was the mash temp, not the fermentation temp. I use brewpal. When my mash is off compared to my recipe, I can adjust in the software and the final gravity will be adjusted based upon the assumption of the fermentable sugars derived from that different mash temp (again, based upon the standard yeast attenuation).

 
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Old 03-19-2010, 02:24 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by petep1980 View Post
Making my Baltic Porter in my new system, I ended up mashing at 160F, I wanted full body. I pitched enough yeast I know, and my fermentation started at 1.072 and ended at 1.024. That seems a bit on the high side, but I heard the higher the mash temp, the less attenuation you'll get.

My previous Baltic's have ended at 1.020, so the 1.024 doesn't really bother me. I'm just curious if the mash temp could affect that? And if I wanted to drop the next batch down to 1.020, should I just lower my mash temp to 156?
What temp was your strike water?
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Old 03-19-2010, 02:26 PM   #10
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My strike water was 175, as calculated by beersmith, I was only off by 2 from my target. I prob over-heated my mash tun, the previous mash I under pre-heated.

 
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