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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Brew Science > Fermentability of splenda
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Old 03-16-2010, 09:33 PM   #1
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Default Fermentability of splenda

Does anyone know if splenda is fermentable? I don't see from a chemical standpoint why it wouldn't be. Would be worried about free chlorine though in beer....


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Old 03-16-2010, 09:49 PM   #2
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Splenda is not fermentable. All it'll do is sweeten your beer (and make it taste like splenda, probably)


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Old 03-22-2010, 01:10 AM   #3
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DO NOT USE IT. I did this by mistake and it made my beer taste like absolute ****.
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Old 04-07-2010, 05:36 AM   #4
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Probably not a good idea to use Splenda for the sheer reason that if it actually did turn into good beer, Budweiser or some other very large brewery likely would have capitalized on this already.

However, Splenda does contain small amounts of maltodextrin, which I believe could be fermentable, but I would imagine your beer would taste very, very bad and the alcohol content would be incredibly low.

I'd error in the side of caution and avoid using it in a batch.
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Old 04-07-2010, 06:01 AM   #5
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Just don't use splenda. Trust me.
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Old 04-07-2010, 02:14 PM   #6
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Splenda has some MD in it, which is somewhat fermentable, but it's just there for bulk. The chlorine is locked in. Nothing short of a plasma torch will release it.

As with any backsweetening, try it in a pint first. It's one of the few artificial sweeteners I like.
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Old 04-07-2010, 02:19 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by homebrewpey View Post
Probably not a good idea to use Splenda for the sheer reason that if it actually did turn into good beer, Budweiser or some other very large brewery likely would have capitalized on this already.

However, Splenda does contain small amounts of maltodextrin, which I believe could be fermentable, but I would imagine your beer would taste very, very bad and the alcohol content would be incredibly low.

I'd error in the side of caution and avoid using it in a batch.
Budweiser isn't a sweet beer.

Lindeman's uses artificial sweeteners.
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Old 04-07-2010, 04:43 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by remilard View Post
Budweiser isn't a sweet beer.
Absolutely. I doubt anyone halfway sane would mistake Budweiser for a sweet beer.

My point was there are hundreds of millions of dollars a year being invested into food science research and if Splenda could make a drinkable beer at a fraction of the calories and sugar, Budweiser or some other large brewery would have already made that beer. They made Bud Light Lime, I don't see any reason they wouldn't have already created Bud Light Light (now with Splenda!).
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Old 04-07-2010, 04:49 PM   #9
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It makes no sense for budweiser to use artificial sweeteners. Lindeman's uses them which seems to defeat the argument that "they have no use because commercial breweries don't use them".

Let's look at this another way, Budweiser doesn't use chocolate malt. Does that mean chocolate malt has no use in beer or does that mean chocolate malt may have uses in beers other than Budweiser?
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Old 04-07-2010, 05:18 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by remilard View Post
It makes no sense for budweiser to use artificial sweeteners.
Yes it does. I would argue the Cherry Bud Light would be quite popular among Americans. I bet you would see it in every supermarket in America.

Quote:
Originally Posted by remilard View Post
Lindeman's uses them which seems to defeat the argument that "they have no use because commercial breweries don't use them".
Yes, but Lindeman's uses them post-fermentation. I believe the title of this thread is "fermentability of Splenda," not "the addition of Splenda to beer after fermentation to make it taste sweeter."

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Originally Posted by remilard View Post
Let's look at this another way, Budweiser doesn't use chocolate malt. Does that mean chocolate malt has no use in beer or does that mean chocolate malt may have uses in beers other than Budweiser?
Not really sure where you're going with this...


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