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Old 03-08-2010, 11:43 AM   #21
brewagentjay
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Jan 2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 400d View Post
I never aerate... and I have crazy fermentations... I mostly use dry yeast (S-04 or US-05) and handle gravities up to 1.060
Can they support high gravities? I use dry and I did my biggest beer todate on Saturday Night.....1.85ish so I at recommendation from LHBS pitched two packs Dry Nottingham...


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Old 03-08-2010, 01:21 PM   #22
goose1873
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Quote:
Originally Posted by itsme6582 View Post
The problem is clear. Your thermometer is wrong. You need to measure in degrees Fahrenheit for beer to work.

Goose: I think it's safe to say that all home brewers aerate their wort. Some more effectively than others. I bet many don't even know they're doing it but it's happening at least to a certain extent. At the same time, the assumption that nearly all AG brewers are using an air pump or O2 tank is a little far fetched. Logic would say the majority of the brewers here are using the simplest of setups with a minimum of equipment. As simple as an air pump would be, it's well beyond the scope of the majority here. That would be like assuming that since there are so many posts with extravagant brew sculptures that nearly all brewers are using these rigs.

From an expert...
"Apparent Prematurely Stuck Fermentation - More often than not you're worrying. Many malt extracts are designed and produced to have a dextrin (unfermentable) content. This gives body to the beer. Some very fine all-malt extract beers will begin fermentation at 1.038 and finish as high as 1.013. Other high-gravity recipes will begin at 1.055 and be ready to bottle at 1.028. Aeration of the wort and choice of yeasts will make some difference, but usually minimal. Roll with the punches and bottle when fermentation has stopped or is negligible." - Papazian; The Complete Joy of Home Brewing, 3rd Edition; pg 359
OK so I understand most don't use forced aeration but most are not doing AG either. Boiling all of the wort for 60 min+ removes ALL oxygen and I bet if we took a poll of All grain (or full boil) brewers, the majority (aka - most) will say that they aerate via air pump or O2...

this is not as big of an issue without full boils, but if you re-read my post I said majority of "all-grain" brewers...

On that note, I do agree most home-brewers just use the shake like hell method...if that

I'm done with this post as there is no need to keep repeating the same thing...and it doesn't matter and has nothing to do with the OP anymore...

If you do full boils, don't aerate, and never have a long lag time till fermentation begins...Kudos to you!...you've managed to overcome simple physics


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Old 03-08-2010, 02:02 PM   #23
wyzazz
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I suggest using a Mix-Stir or paint stirrer on a drill to aerate your wort in your case. Just stir it up until you have a nice frothy head.

Also, keep in mind that you need to use the freshest, highest quality DME/LME you can get your mitts on. If you're not getting down to your expected FG, it may be an issue with the fermentability of your Extracts, or even that you're not pitching enough yeast.
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Old 03-09-2010, 04:30 PM   #24
muthafuggle
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Jan 2010
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I've been using an aquarium pump with a cheap, disposable airstone that I soak in star-san for about 40 minutes and flush with said star-san before use. I do not use an in-line filter , but I DO soak the air pump and it's filter in star-san before use.

Total cost for my rig: $25 Disposable airstones are about 70 cents each (or less)

My fermentation has been massive since I started using it, and no issues with infections. Oh, and I just switched to AG from using extracts.
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Old 03-09-2010, 07:16 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goose1873 View Post
it works but you need an inline air filter and it takes about 30 min. I recommend a oxygen bottle ($10 at hardware store). I use a propane valve b/c it was free and a sterile aquarium air-stone with fishtank tubing...the whole thing costs 20 bucks and each tank will oxygenate 25-30 batches.

I do (2) 30 second bursts of O2...so 1 minute total. Search the threads as there is a lot of info in past threads...
how do you use a propane valve? Propane tank threads are right hand and O2 tanks are left hand thread.

OP you don't need anything special to aerate the wort the shake method works and has been used by thousands of homebrewers. If you are using dry yeast like Notty Danstar says areation is no needed since you are pitching the proper amount of yeast. If you are using liquid you need to make a starter.
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Old 03-09-2010, 07:29 PM   #26
android
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Quote:
Originally Posted by muthafuggle View Post
I've been using an aquarium pump with a cheap, disposable airstone that I soak in star-san for about 40 minutes and flush with said star-san before use. I do not use an in-line filter , but I DO soak the air pump and it's filter in star-san before use.

Total cost for my rig: $25 Disposable airstones are about 70 cents each (or less)

My fermentation has been massive since I started using it, and no issues with infections. Oh, and I just switched to AG from using extracts.
i do the same, except i use a sterile inline air filter. was only like 5 bucks. i've used the same 'disposable' stone for the past 5 or 6 brews without any detrimental effects, so I think i'll keep on using it until it looks like it's getting wear and tear. works great every time. i only run mine for 15 minutes though after listening to the 'brew strong' on aeration. seems like more than 15 could potentially affect the head retention and 15 seems like plenty to me with the amount of foam that gets produced and i don't like cleaning it off the carboy.
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Old 03-09-2010, 07:45 PM   #27
Superdave
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For the last couple brews, I have done a slightly modified shake method.

I simply shut down the kettle draining after about a gallon to 1.5 gallons has drained into the carboy. Then I shake the crap out of the sucker! Judging by the 6 inches or so of foam on top, I can say that gallon has all kinds of air in it. Then I continue draining as normal. Doing it this way, it is much easier to get a good shake on the wort with less risk of dropping or breaking something.

The fermentations have always taken off very quickly.

 
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Old 03-09-2010, 08:04 PM   #28
SpanishCastleAle
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Jan 2009
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As mentioned, no need to aerate with dry yeast. The yeast mfr has already jam-packed it full of all the nutrients it needs for a full fermentation. A stone with an air pump is about the same as shaking the carboy but takes longer and adds risk of contamination. A stone with pure O2 gives those other two methods a swift kitn.

Quote:
The fermentations have always taken off very quickly.
If anything, more dissolved O2 in wort extends the lag time because the yeast are still busy taking in the O2.

I often use a funnel with strainer on the carboy. You practically cannot get the wort into the carboy this way without aerating it very well. I do that and don't even shake it and the fermentations are fine. If I do a whirlpool and use a ball valve then I just let the tube barely protrude the neck of the carboy and let the wort drop the full height of the carboy (and hitting the bottom, i.e. not hitting the sidewall first). Again, almost impossible to NOT get it aerated that way.

Cold liquid can hold more O2 than warm so, to a point, the cooler the better.
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Old 03-09-2010, 08:48 PM   #29
goose1873
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Dec 2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by springer View Post
how do you use a propane valve? Propane tank threads are right hand and O2 tanks are left hand thread.

OP you don't need anything special to aerate the wort the shake method works and has been used by thousands of homebrewers. If you are using dry yeast like Notty Danstar says areation is no needed since you are pitching the proper amount of yeast. If you are using liquid you need to make a starter.
I actually thought that until i bought a red O2 tank and the threads are the same...any propane nozzle will fit on an o2 tanks.
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Old 03-09-2010, 08:54 PM   #30
Frank99
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http://www.williamsbrewing.com/22_AE...D_P490C106.cfm

Get this and a $10 aquarium pump at Walmart.

I don't think you need an oxygen tank. It's just another added expense IMO



 
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