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Old 09-11-2012, 08:50 PM   #21
Tamarlane
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Sorry to make it go back up, I want to make a "Meat pie" Ale for my festive ale this year. I will put Cinamon, Jamaican pepper and nutmeg in that ale. I will use the "Jean Talon" yeast salvaged from an Annedda ale.

I wonder how to add the umami without it being too overwelming.
I have had good results with this one, more of a fall brew than holiday but some roasted barley or carafa could remedy that:

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f76/rude...rk-ale-286567/

Allspice > Nutmeg


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Old 09-11-2012, 09:11 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by SimonPascal View Post
Sorry to make it go back up, I want to make a "Meat pie" Ale for my festive ale this year. I will put Cinamon, Jamaican pepper and nutmeg in that ale. I will use the "Jean Talon" yeast salvaged from an Annedda ale.

I wonder how to add the umami without it being too overwelming.
Also could try allspice, known in Jamaica as Pimento. Indeed, if you look on the web you can find allspice twigs (AKA Pimento) that Jamaicans burn to cook their jerk chicken. I've never tried it but it occurs to me that they might be useful in the way that gesho twigs are used to make t'ej.

And well caramalized malts will add some umami taste without being overwhelming in my experience.


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Old 09-11-2012, 10:48 PM   #23
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So if I want to get a "Meat pie" Ale, I would have to add the "meaty" taste. I know that Ceppe mushroom when they get rehydrated infuse the water with a beefy flavor. So if I add that water in secondary and kombu in the boil I would get the "Meat Pie" Ale?
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Old 09-11-2012, 11:55 PM   #24
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Jamaican pepper and all spice is the same
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Old 09-12-2012, 01:02 AM   #25
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Jamaican pepper and all spice is the same
I hadn't heard it referred to as such so I assumed you meant scotch bonnets. In that case, you should definitely add some scotch bonnets. Dry them and toast them in a dry skillet... that should add some umami. Mushrooms sounds good but I would be afraid to overdo it and ruin a batch. Adding to the secondary is probably a good idea because you can take samples and add more as needed.

A little allspice goes a long way by the way but if it is too intense it will mellow over time quite nicely.
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Old 09-13-2012, 03:53 PM   #26
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I was thinking of 1/2 teaspoon of all spice.
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Old 09-14-2012, 01:43 AM   #27
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I was thinking of 1/2 teaspoon of all spice.
Yeah, and I think you are on to something there with the mushrooms. Let us know how it turns out. (How about some raisins?)
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Old 09-14-2012, 01:49 AM   #28
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Yeah, and I think you are on to something there with the mushrooms. Let us know how it turns out. (How about some raisins?)
No raisin. We were thinking cranberries (dried) tho. But we decided not to.
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Old 04-11-2013, 03:45 PM   #29
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I am currently drinking my "Oooh Mommy" porter (see what I did there?), where I took my standard robust porter recipe, added a 50g package of kombu (Laminaria sp.) strips to the boil, then another 50g to the secondary.

Honestly, it took some getting used to, but the more I drink it the more I enjoy it. Would not recommend it to neophyte beer drinkers. Very earthy aroma with hits of of that salty air you get at the beach. Standard-issue porter chocolatey sweetness followed by a wash of salty bitterness on the mid-palate. Very long cigar smoke/espresso-type finish.

Caveat emptor re: bottle conditioning - Carbonation level will be very slight with absolutely no head retention. I attribute this to two attributes of the kelp that I should have taken into consideration, both of which act as chemical monkey wrenches. First, seaweeds are naturally high in iodine content. Second, the tannic acid imparted by soaking the kelp in the secondary (the main reason why the finish is so freakishly long). I think a combination of those two are why a brew like this ought to be kegged if you want a good carb level, even if you are adding a seaweed "tea" at bottling.

Also - don't bother adding this or any seaweed to the mash. While there are copious amounts of polysaccharides and other available sugars in seaweeds, at a molecular level they are immensely long chains. These molecules can only be broken down into fermentable sugars by either intensely heating them to between 212-572 deg F (study done at Hokkaido Univ. in Japan in the mid-2000's), or having them partially digested by genetically-engineered strains of E. coli (biofuels study at Cal-Berkeley released last year).


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