Oak aging- short term vs. long term - Home Brew Forums

Register Now!
Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Beer Discussion > Oak aging- short term vs. long term

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 02-25-2010, 09:36 PM   #1
grammatron
Recipes 
 
Nov 2008
Peachtree City, GA
Posts: 112


I'm getting ready to do an imperial stout that I'm planning to oak age. I've read a handful of threads here about oaking, but I'd really like to get some input on how long I should let the beer sit on the cubes.

My impression is that short term is a "taste it and see when it's done" kind of thing, and that once it's good, you bottle it and that's that. So does this mean that long-term (like the people who suggest 6 months, etc) is basically going way over that point, then mellowing to a tasty finish?

If that's the case, what are the differences in the finished product? I guess my options are:

1. Oak age for a week or two in the secondary, bottle it.
2. Oak age for a week or two in the secondary, then transfer to a clean carboy for longer-term aging off the wood.
3. Oak age for long-term, 6 or 7 months, then bottle.

Which of these methods do you recommend, and what's likely to be the difference in the final product?

Thanks for your input!

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-25-2010, 09:43 PM   #2
Yooper
Ale's What Cures You!
HBT_ADMIN.png
 
Yooper's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Jun 2006
UP of Michigan, Winter Texan
Posts: 69,202
Liked 7710 Times on 5416 Posts


If you're oaking with cubes or chips, it usually is enough after a few weeks. Once they give up their flavor, it doesn't get much stronger unless you add fresh cubes. I will say that even just oaking on one ounce chips (in three gallons) for two weeks was plenty for me. It took about 4 months to mellow in the bottle into a nice smooth beer. Before that, it was too oaky.
__________________
Broken Leg Brewery
Giving beer a leg to stand on since 2006

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-27-2010, 02:28 PM   #3
grammatron
Recipes 
 
Nov 2008
Peachtree City, GA
Posts: 112

bump

Anyone else wanna chime in on this?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-27-2010, 05:00 PM   #4
RenoDean
Recipes 
 
Mar 2009
Reno, Nv
Posts: 51

I recently oaked a dark amber and there was enough oak flavor after 4 days. I used 1 oz of french oak chips for 5 gal. I then bottled and will probably age in bottles for a few months. There's less chance of oxidation in bottles than in a carboy. Oak cubes will take longer than chips to get flavor. Just keep tasting to see because you can't un-oak. You should download jamil show podcast and brew strong podcast on oak aging , they give some really good info on both these shows.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 03-01-2010, 05:32 PM   #5
Jipper
Recipes 
 
Dec 2008
Posts: 509
Liked 47 Times on 42 Posts


Chips are done in about a week and give a straight, up front flavor. Cubes are more mellow and will slowly does your beer over 6-8 months. This is my preferred method, and the one that will best replicate aging in a barrel. The oak will mellow over time, but I don't think it should be something you plan on.

We have a nice article on using oak in beer, it may help you understand more of what you are looking for: http://morebeer.com/content/using_oak_in_beer

Good luck!

 
Reply With Quote


Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Short Term beer aging FreakinA General Beer Discussion 2 11-21-2009 05:35 AM
Long term Bulk Aging Parker36 General Beer Discussion 11 08-01-2009 02:32 AM
What are the best closures for long term aging? conpewter Bottling/Kegging 10 07-02-2009 02:30 PM
Better-Bottle for long term mead aging? Liquisky Mead Forum 5 07-18-2008 08:00 PM
Long Term Aging Tips EddieGlick General Techniques 11 04-25-2008 11:15 PM


Forum Jump