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Old 02-09-2010, 05:24 AM   #1
sojam
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Default Milk Stout---Question

I just finished up making a milk stout -with malt extract recipe- and the recipe called for 1lb lactose powder to be added to the brewpot.

Now when I took my initial pre-fermentation gravity reading I got 1.09....

Does this mean I'll have a stout that is very high in alcohol content? Or is the lactose inflating my gravity reading?

Do I have to be worried about my the lid blowing off my fermenter (something I heard is prone to happen with high gravity beers)?

Please help!


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Old 02-09-2010, 01:10 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by sojam View Post
I just finished up making a milk stout -with malt extract recipe- and the recipe called for 1lb lactose powder to be added to the brewpot.

Now when I took my initial pre-fermentation gravity reading I got 1.09....

Does this mean I'll have a stout that is very high in alcohol content? Or is the lactose inflating my gravity reading?

Do I have to be worried about my the lid blowing off my fermenter (something I heard is prone to happen with high gravity beers)?

Please help!
I would say both. Is the 1.09 the corrected reading?
Someone can correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe the lactose is mostly usfermentable, so it will add to the gravity which will add to the higher FG.

As far as the lid goes... good luck.



Reason: corrected for correctness
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Old 02-09-2010, 01:19 PM   #3
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No, lactose is unfermentable. Its in there to sweeten up the beer and keep a higher FG. So yes, your OG is "artifically inflated". I don't really remember how much gravity lactose contributes. A blowoff tube never hurts.
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Old 02-09-2010, 02:50 PM   #4
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Quote:
Does this mean I'll have a stout that is very high in alcohol content? Or is the lactose inflating my gravity reading?
Yes and yes. Even subtracting the lactose, you'll have an 8% beer. Very high for a milk stout and the alcohol flavor will probably dominate instead of the sweetness.
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Old 02-09-2010, 03:02 PM   #5
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just curious: what was your recipe?
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Old 02-09-2010, 11:23 PM   #6
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Extract recipe? Partial boil? If yes to both, what was the calculated OG? Your measured OG may be inaccurate if the boiled wort and top-off water was not mixed completely (which is very common).
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Old 02-09-2010, 11:29 PM   #7
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1 lb. of lactose in 5 gallons of wort will only give you 1.007 of unfermentable sugars. assuming you didn't add to much extract the high reading is probably due to wort stratification. the extract doesn't mix well with the water and sits on the bottom. so when you take a reading from wort at the bottom you get a false high reading. if this is the case then i would just throw out the reading and not bother calculating the ABV. still take SG readings to determine when fermentation is over.

next time cool the wort then whirlpool it like mad then let it sit covered for 10 minutes. this should mix your wort and extract good and give you a more accurate reading.

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Old 02-10-2010, 12:00 AM   #8
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Definitely suspect the partial boil issue. I'd also be interested to know what the recipe was...
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Old 02-10-2010, 12:44 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by TipsyDragon View Post
1 lb. of lactose in 5 gallons of wort will only give you 1.007 of unfermentable sugars. assuming you didn't add to much extract the high reading is probably due to wort stratification. the extract doesn't mix well with the water and sits on the bottom. so when you take a reading from wort at the bottom you get a false high reading. if this is the case then i would just throw out the reading and not bother calculating the ABV. still take SG readings to determine when fermentation is over.

next time cool the wort then whirlpool it like mad then let it sit covered for 10 minutes. this should mix your wort and extract good and give you a more accurate reading.
Thank you very much for the advice. I'm a rookie so I'll keep that in mind for next time!

The recipe was as follows:

5.5 lbs Munton Medium Malt Extract

0.6 lb Roasted Barley
0.6 lb Chocolate Malt
1.0 lb Extra Dark Crystal Malt

1 lb Lactose
300 ml (roughly 10oz) Molasses

60 grams (roughly 2 oz) Northern Brewer --60 minutes
30 grams (roughly 1 oz) Fuggles -- 30 minutes
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Old 02-10-2010, 03:42 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by sojam View Post
Thank you very much for the advice. I'm a rookie so I'll keep that in mind for next time!

The recipe was as follows:

5.5 lbs Munton Medium Malt Extract

0.6 lb Roasted Barley
0.6 lb Chocolate Malt
1.0 lb Extra Dark Crystal Malt

1 lb Lactose
300 ml (roughly 10oz) Molasses

60 grams (roughly 2 oz) Northern Brewer --60 minutes
30 grams (roughly 1 oz) Fuggles -- 30 minutes
I plugged all that into my brew software and it says you should be around 1.071 o.g. ; looking for around 1.017 F.G. , abv 7.0 and 68 IBU's. this may not be 100% accurate, but it should give you a good bearing


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