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Old 11-08-2006, 12:58 PM   #1
Steve99
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Nov 2006
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Hi Guys,
I'm really new to this hobby and kinda like it until now. I filled my first fermenter yesterday with a kit of Muntons American Style Light Ale. I have two questions for you to help me:

1) My hydrometer was showing 1,300. I think it's too high. Is it possible I missread and it is 1,030 ??? I'm pretty sure it was written 300 on it but the spaces between 1,000-1,100-1,200-1,300 are really small. Do you think it's a problem ?

2) My Muntons kits instructions says to leave it covered for 5-7 days and then to bottle it. I though I should do a transfer to my glass corboys in 7 days and then wait for 2 weeks. What do you suggest ? and should I add something to the carboy if I need to transfer it ?

Thanks

Steve



 
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Old 11-08-2006, 01:09 PM   #2
Yooper
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Your hydrometer is set to read at the hundredths, like 1.010, 1.020, etc. The highest you'll ever get might be 1.100. (I have a friend who makes big beers like that). The majority of my beers have a starting gravity of between 1.046 to 1.060. When it ferments, the s.g. drops because alcohol is lighter than water. A hydrometer dropped in plain water at 60 degrees reads 1.000. So, as it ferments it might go from 1.050 to 1.016. When the s.g. is the same three days in a row, your beer is finished fermenting and can be moved to secondary or bottled. I prefer a secondary so my beer clears and finishes up. I leave it in secondary for 2 weeks or so then bottle. You don't add anything at all at this point- just siphon it off the sediment on the bottom with a siphon tube being very careful not to splash or otherwise aerate your beer. Keep it under airlock in a cool dark place.

Hope this helps,

Lorena


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Old 11-09-2006, 12:22 AM   #3
Beerhead
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Nov 2006
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also, how a hydrometer goes is usually

1.000
-
-
-
-
10
-
-
-
-
20


The 10 and the 20 do not represent 1.100, but 1.010, a little confusion there, and that is what you probably read it as.

For question number two a lot of people on the board like to follow the 1-2-3 rule of thumb (1 week primary, 2 secondary, 3 bottled) I think that it is a good idea to take the S.G. of the brew when fermentation starts to slow down until you get the same S.G. for three days. Then you know that the beer is ready to be moved to the secondary.

Good Luck, and welcome!!!
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Old 11-09-2006, 01:00 AM   #4
Steve99
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Nov 2006
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I don't want to open my bucket to see if it's fermenting and it's a closed bucket.

How will I know if it's fermenting ?

 
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Old 11-09-2006, 01:28 AM   #5
Beerhead
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve99
I don't want to open my bucket to see if it's fermenting and it's a closed bucket.

How will I know if it's fermenting ?
Well you can also just watch the airbubbles that come out of the airlock, another rule of thumb is that when the bubbles are occuring at less than 1bpm, then you should be good. However, it is ok to open the lid of your bucket to take a sample, just make sure that you sterilize everything that the beer comes into contact with, and that included the lid!
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Old 11-09-2006, 01:42 AM   #6
Steve99
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Nov 2006
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My closed bucket doesn't have an airlock !

 
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Old 11-09-2006, 02:18 AM   #7
Bernie Brewer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve99
My closed bucket doesn't have an airlock !
KaBOOM!!! Another one about to join the Mop The Ceiling Club!!!!
You need some way to vent the CO2 produced during fermentation, or you're going to have a bucket bomb. An airlock, a device which lets CO2 out without letting outside air in, is best.
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Old 11-09-2006, 03:19 AM   #8
Steve99
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Nov 2006
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For real, what should I do now to avoid that ?

 
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Old 11-09-2006, 03:26 AM   #9
Bernie Brewer
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I think you'd better loosen the lid on your fermenter. don't open it, just crack it slightly to relieve pressure, then let the lid sit on loosely till fermentation is done, probably around two weeks. Then for your next batch, get an airlock.
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Old 11-09-2006, 03:36 AM   #10
Steve99
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Nov 2006
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Ok, I have a spare cover and I just made an hole in it and insert an airlock. Now, is it better to do what you said a open it a little bit or to remove the cover completely and put the other one with the airlock ?



 
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