Vegemite in beer? - Home Brew Forums
Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Beer Discussion > Vegemite in beer?
Cool Brewing Giveaway - Supporting Membership Drive & Discount

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 02-02-2010, 03:06 PM   #1
Travel_mon
Recipes 
 
Jul 2008
West Chester, PA
Posts: 41


Greetings.

A co-worker just got back from Down Under and brought me a little packet of Vegemite spread. I've wiki'd the stuff and see it's made from Brewer's yeast, so then I began thinking about how I could use it in a beer. I'll ferment just about anything.


So... Anyone have an experience or suggestions on how best to use this stuff in a batch? Could I use it in a starter? or?


Cheers
Travel_mon



 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2010, 03:10 PM   #2
Edcculus
Recipes 
 
Jun 2007
Greenville, SC
Posts: 4,539
Liked 48 Times on 45 Posts


I'm not really sure if I'd use it in beer. Vegemite is made from autolyzed yeast. That is, yeast that have gone through their life cycle, sat around then "lysed" or broken open. The compounds in yeast, primarily the glutamates is what gives it the savory/meaty taste. In recent years, the flavor has been described as "umami". Obviously, Vegemite is dead yeast, so it won't ferment anything. At low levels, autolysis flavors offer some complexity in big beers. It is also a contributing flavor to traditional Champagne. Autolysis is generally a flavor we try to avoid in beer.




 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2010, 03:24 PM   #3
Homercidal
Licensed Sensual Massage Therapist.
HBT_MODERATOR.png
 
Homercidal's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Feb 2008
Reed City, MI
Posts: 29,863
Liked 4527 Times on 3052 Posts


You could make vegemite from your brewing yeast, but vegemite itself is not going to ferment anything. It's dead.
__________________
What year is this?
It's the Viking age.
That explains the Laser Raptors! F***! I went back in time too far! - Kung Fury

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2010, 03:29 PM   #4
Revvy
Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
 
Revvy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Dec 2007
"Detroitish" Michigan
Posts: 40,890
Liked 3158 Times on 1869 Posts


Have you actually tasted it? After you do, you more than likely wouldn't want that taste in your beer. It's an, how should we say it, "acquired" taste.
__________________
Like my snazzy new avatar? Get Sons of Zymurgy swag, here, and brew with the best.

Revvy's one of the cool reverends. He has a Harley and a t-shirt that says on the back "If you can read this, the bitch was Raptured. - Madman

I gotta tell ya, just between us girls, that Revvy is HOT. Very tall, gorgeous grey hair and a terrific smile. He's very good looking in person, with a charismatic personality... he drives like a ****ing maniac! - YooperBrew

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2010, 03:42 PM   #5
northernlad
Recipes 
 
Aug 2009
NW
Posts: 1,618
Liked 27 Times on 22 Posts


Thank your friend then use it as a practical joke on someone. It is not suitable for consumption despite the fact that Australians eat it.
Apparently they think PB&J's are gross but they'll eat that shyt.

2
People Like This 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2010, 04:11 PM   #6
gtpro
Recipes 
 
Nov 2009
Manchester, NH
Posts: 508
Liked 4 Times on 4 Posts


I spent about 6 months in Australia and its no joke, they love this stuff. I got to a point where for experience sake I would put a very thin spread on a piece of toast and eat it in small bites. Its like black spreadable salt.

Customs took my jar on the way back

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2010, 08:21 PM   #7
Styles
Recipes 
 
Apr 2009
Papakura, New Zealand
Posts: 152
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts


It certainly is an acquired taste. You really don't want it in your beer, it'll just be nasty. If you are really keen you'll want to put it in a stout. My recommendation is to get a couple of bits of toast, butter them (very important!) then thinly spread the vegemite on. I think this is where a lot of people go wrong because it needs to be really, really thin, and you can only get that if the toast has butter/margarine on it.
You may like to add some cheese and grill it, yum!

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2010, 09:16 PM   #8
Sedge
Recipes 
 
Aug 2009
Corvallis, OR
Posts: 343
Liked 3 Times on 3 Posts


I bet you could use it to some extent as a yeast nutrient
__________________
Fermenting: Flanders Red Ale
Conditioning: Blackberry Mead, Altbier, Cardamom Saison
Kegged: Vanilla Bourbon Porter, Belgian Strong Dark

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2010, 10:14 PM   #9
Quaffer
Recipes 
 
Dec 2008
Snohomish, WA
Posts: 418
Liked 29 Times on 15 Posts


I got the British variety, Marmite, at the English shelf at my supermarket. After experimenting with various ways of "enjoying" it, I found that a very thin layer on Ritz crackers is not bad. You've got to really like salt, though. I can't imagine putting this stuff in my beer.
I got some barley water too, and it is great. Not what I expected.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 02-02-2010, 10:34 PM   #10
Finnagann
Recipes 
 
Jan 2010
Saskatoon, Canada
Posts: 76

Lol, its pretty strong taste. Perhaps you could start by making a "tea" with a tiny bit of it and adding to a few bottles at bottling time? Then you won't waste a whole batch, or your jar of vegimite, if it doesn't work out. Also there is only minimal fermentation happening at that point so autolysis shouldn't be an issue?



 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Brewing Beer, Drinking Beer and Managing Beer Gut permo General Beer Discussion 141 05-01-2016 05:10 PM
Never dump your beer!!! Patience IS a virtue!!! Time heals all things, even beer! Revvy Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 548 01-26-2016 07:14 AM
Request for a sticky: Tutorial on Beer Photography (Beer in a glass) Boerderij_Kabouter Home Brewing Photo Forum 21 03-24-2013 01:58 AM
Beer in Hell: original painting of demons and sinners brewing beer! aflyershckyfan For Sale 7 06-06-2009 03:50 AM
Quotes about real beer drinkers drinking dark beer archmaker General Beer Discussion 33 01-31-2008 03:44 PM


Forum Jump