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Old 11-06-2006, 05:34 PM   #11
anthrobe
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I always store my kegs at room temperature. When I am aging the beer, I am really not to concerned with it being carbonated. I will pressurize the keg up a little to seal the opening. When I am going to tap the keg, I put it in the fridge and set the regulator at ~12psi. My fridge sits around 36F and I adjust the pressure within the next couple of days until I get the carbination to where I like it. I also serve at this pressure. Any higher and you will get foam or lower the beer will not pour well. In order to correctly carbonate then you will have to chill the keg down unless you primed the keg when the beer was transfered in. The beer will only absorb as much CO2 as it can at the temperature it is at. Best just pouring a beer and adjusting as necessary.
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Old 11-06-2006, 07:21 PM   #12
dougjones31
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Ol Grog....you are making this too difficult. You are overthinking it.

You can age kegs cold or at room temp without much difference.

You pumped your keg up to 30 lbs and now it has dropped to 17 lbs. The co2 pressure that is missing has absorbed into the beer. You need a quick lesson on carb charts. Store your beer at a steady temp. The up and down temps of your garage is not the ideal storage temp. OK...back to your 17 lbs fo pressure...........................you need a constant temp to tell how much CO2 has been absorbed. Use the constant temp and look at the chart. If your pressure does not equal the pressure recommendation for that temp on the chart....then your beer has not absorbed enough co2 yet.

Example. I have a keg of Stout that I just kegged. It is 68 degrees and so is pantry where I am going to store it while it ages. My carb chart says that I need 17 lbs of pressure @ 68 degrees to force 1.7 volumes of co2 into suspension.

Anyway......I hook it to the bottle and pump 30 lbs into it and let it sit a couple of days. I check it and only have 8 lbs of pressure after 2 days. I hook it back up to the bottle and pump it up to 20 lbs and wait 2 or 3 days. I chck it then and the pressure is 15 lbs. I would say it is carbed now. Carbonation is directly proportional to temp. So as long as that keg sits at 68 degrees it is perfectly carbed.....But what happens when I throw it in a 40 degree fridge for a day or two??? The pressure inside the keg is going to drop. Is it still carbed correctly?? Lets check the chart. If the pressure in the cold keg is 3.6 lbs then it is still carbed to 1.7 volumes and is exactly what I wanted for my stout.

The trick is getting it out of the keg without altering the pressure. As the level inside the keg drops you will have to increase the pressure to get the beer out, but this will also overcarb the beer if you let it sit with the pressure turned up. I tend to adjust the pressure to where the beer pours correctly but I always release the pressure release and reset the regulator to 3.6 lbs before I go to bed that night. Once you know what your target pressure /temp is then you should have no problems.
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Old 11-06-2006, 07:26 PM   #13
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[QUOTE=anthrobe]I always store my kegs at room temperature. When I am aging the beer, I am really not to concerned with it being carbonated. [QUOTE]


You should be warned that you have to have carbonation in the beer for it to age correctly. Co2 changes the PH of the beer. It also forms compounds such as carbonic acid which , in tandem with the PH change helps to mellow the flavors.

Beer will age uncarbed, but it will never reach maturity until you carb it.
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Old 11-06-2006, 07:52 PM   #14
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Thank for the info doug. I will try that this weekend when I keg my porter.
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Old 11-07-2006, 01:03 PM   #15
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Thanks. Clears up a lot of things. You guys ROCK!!!!
Good explaination . I need to crank up the pressure to the chart spec's and let it sit some more. Until I get a keg cooler, I'm going to be dealing with higher pressures. You don't think that will screw up the cornies do you???
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Old 11-07-2006, 01:09 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ol' Grog
Thanks. Clears up a lot of things. You guys ROCK!!!!
Good explaination . I need to crank up the pressure to the chart spec's and let it sit some more. Until I get a keg cooler, I'm going to be dealing with higher pressures. You don't think that will screw up the cornies do you???
No worries about the cornies. They have a built in pressure limit after which they will automatically bleed off excess CO2 anyway. I can't remember the exact PSI that the pressure relief valve will automatically bleed CO2, but I'm sure someone else here could give you the exact number.
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Old 11-07-2006, 01:49 PM   #17
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I think they will handle 130 lbs. Don't quote me or try to pressurize them that much. I think I remember reading one of the vendors pressure tests to 130 lbs.
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Old 11-07-2006, 08:34 PM   #18
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One question about shaking. Say it's at 30 psi. Turn off the gas, then shake. Beer then will flow into the pressure line, not good. So, pressure it up to 30 psi, take off the poppet valve, and then shake it like a rabid dog. Now, when I go to put the poppet valve back on, what psi do I need on the pressure hose? If it's too little, beer will surely run back up through the pressure line, if I hook it back up to 30 psi, I'm back to square one. All I have now is a cobra head dispenser. What psi do I need the keg to dispense without having a brew shower in my garage? Does it help if I hold the tap up high, above the keg? So, if I'm carbing at say 20 psi, the chart designated pressure, hook up the cobra tap, I need to bleed off the pressure inside the keg. If I back it off from the regulator, won't brew come back up through the pressure line?
I know.....I know.......questions, questions, questions.................
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Old 11-07-2006, 11:34 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ol' Grog
One question about shaking. Say it's at 30 psi. Turn off the gas, then shake. Beer then will flow into the pressure line, not good. So, pressure it up to 30 psi, take off the poppet valve, and then shake it like a rabid dog. Now, when I go to put the poppet valve back on, what psi do I need on the pressure hose? If it's too little, beer will surely run back up through the pressure line, if I hook it back up to 30 psi, I'm back to square one. All I have now is a cobra head dispenser. What psi do I need the keg to dispense without having a brew shower in my garage? Does it help if I hold the tap up high, above the keg? So, if I'm carbing at say 20 psi, the chart designated pressure, hook up the cobra tap, I need to bleed off the pressure inside the keg. If I back it off from the regulator, won't brew come back up through the pressure line?
I know.....I know.......questions, questions, questions.................
You are so overthinking the whole kegging process.

Forget shaking. Just dial up the correct pressure, based on the beer temerature and volumes of CO2 you want, hook it up to your cornie and let it sit for five to seven days. Your arms will thank you, and so will your tongue as the extra week of aging will help mellow out the flavor of the beer.
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Old 11-08-2006, 05:29 AM   #20
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I never mentioned shaking because it is not necessary. You are still overthinking this.

No shaking the kegs. If you do not shake the then you do not have to worry about getting beer in the gas line. Read my long post again and pay attention this time.


As for dispensing pressure. You will have to see how your setup acts. The hose size and length make all the difference in the world. If your tap hose is long enough, you can despense at 20 lbs without having too much foam, but if your is too short you may have to back off on the regulator pressure and then release some keg pressure to keep it from foaming too much. It is OK to do this for an evening, but you should always turn the regulator pressure back up before you go to bed or pass out!

Relasing pressure inside the keg does not make the beer go flat instantly. CO2 stays in suspension and outgasses slowly, you never release all the pressure so the beer outgasses even slower. In short a few hours with the pressure turned down will not affect the cabonation level of the beer. The only way to change the carbonation level instantly is to shake it or heat it drastically, or pour it out!

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