Home Brew Forums > Recipe Database > HomeBrewTalk.com Recipe Database > Belgian Strong Ale > All-Grain - Rochefort 8 clone (as close as you can get)!

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Old 09-29-2013, 03:03 AM   #101
ayupbrewing
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Whoot Whoot!! What a beer! I brewed this on May 4th (hence I call it "Dark Vader"). Its been bottle conditioning since beginning of June and tastes really good now. Its lost the sweetness it had from the early days, which is good, and is just quite delicious. I had never had Rocheforte 8 until couple of weeks ago and was quite surprised how similar this is!! Great recipe, thanks! Here are some pics from last night and tonight!!
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Old 09-29-2013, 03:14 PM   #102
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That looks mighty nice!
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Old 10-03-2013, 10:25 PM   #103
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For the people that have brewed this several times with no subs I'm wondering what did you use for the "dark candi sugar"?

Are you using a dark candi syrup like D2 or is it in fact dark candi sugar which is essentially from my understanding just rock sugar with some molasses? The taste would be entirely different which is why I ask.

Basically are we looking for flavor from this addition or just alcohol? I've tasted a few beers with the dark rock sugar and it added nothing flavor wise as far as I'm concerned. The syrup on the other hand has an incredible flavor.
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Old 11-24-2013, 12:32 AM   #104
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That is a great looking ale . In deferring to a more recent grain bills at Rochefort, we use torrified wheat and no longer use coriander. Carafa actually departed considerably from the actual Rochefort 8 flavor profile, (even though BLAM does mention coriander). Special B is also not a required part of the grist as there is no burned raisin affect in an actual Rochefort 8. This assumes that what we're after is an actual clone of a Rochefort 8 and not a replication of Hermann Holtrop's well brewed recipe.

A Rochefort 8 is better made with fewer ingredients relying heavily on a good water profile, strict mash method, a high quality adjunct, and careful ferm temps.

But, with due respect H.H's recipe makes a nice ale, just not much like a Rochefort 8 other than the ester profiles from using the same yeast.
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Old 11-24-2013, 12:47 AM   #105
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thirstyutahn View Post
For the people that have brewed this several times with no subs I'm wondering what did you use for the "dark candi sugar"?

Are you using a dark candi syrup like D2 or is it in fact dark candi sugar which is essentially from my understanding just rock sugar with some molasses? The taste would be entirely different which is why I ask.

Basically are we looking for flavor from this addition or just alcohol? I've tasted a few beers with the dark rock sugar and it added nothing flavor wise as far as I'm concerned. The syrup on the other hand has an incredible flavor.
Absolutely agree. Belgian rock is just crystallized sucrose. Some say it has a little dye in it for the appearance of a darker color. The rock candi definitely has no caramel or maillard in it and is very much flavorless. Always recommended to use the syrups whether the D-180 or D2 is selected, (actually a Rochefort 8 is best brewed with D-90). The syrup will do much better than the rock candi for natural color and flavor.
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Old 12-04-2013, 09:36 PM   #106
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Dear homebrew friends,

We brewed this recipe for our first strong Belgian ale and followed it very closely; however, our OG was way low at 1.064. The only deviation occurred during the mash out. The temperature only raised to 160 degrees. Otherwise we followed the recipe to the letter.

A low OG seems to be a reoccurring issue when I brew. Someone help!
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Old 12-05-2013, 03:32 PM   #107
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I heat y strike water about 25F over what beer smith tells me. My cooler mash run takes it down about 10 and the grains absorb the rest, 15, which is more than beer smith usually calculates. Always aim on the high side because its easier to cool down than heat up. Same with mash out water. And if you mash has dropped 5 F during mash the mash out water needs to bring it up even more to account for that. Other tha getting that right you might check your grains are milled properly.
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Old 03-20-2014, 09:55 PM   #108
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I'm drinking one of these right now... in Brussels! Great beer, but I noticed that it's 9.2% and the first recipe on this thread is 1.078 - 1.018 = 7.9%, not a huge diff but wondering if anyone noticed that. Sorry if this was already covered in the thread, I read through about half but not all.
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Old 03-22-2014, 09:49 PM   #109
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thirstyutahn View Post
For the people that have brewed this several times with no subs I'm wondering what did you use for the "dark candi sugar"?

Are you using a dark candi syrup like D2 or is it in fact dark candi sugar which is essentially from my understanding just rock sugar with some molasses? The taste would be entirely different which is why I ask.

Basically are we looking for flavor from this addition or just alcohol? I've tasted a few beers with the dark rock sugar and it added nothing flavor wise as far as I'm concerned. The syrup on the other hand has an incredible flavor.
The brown soft sugars, (Cassonade), have a little too much sucrose for this recipe. They're great in Maredsous Brun and Achel but are slightly off for a Roch 8 pallet. D2 is a little more molasses-like and ends in more of a brown ale unless you up the percentages. D-180 Candi Syrup is best for color and the characteristic plums/cherry in a Rochefort 8 (and 10).
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Old 03-22-2014, 09:51 PM   #110
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigM View Post
Dear homebrew friends,

We brewed this recipe for our first strong Belgian ale and followed it very closely; however, our OG was way low at 1.064. The only deviation occurred during the mash out. The temperature only raised to 160 degrees. Otherwise we followed the recipe to the letter.

A low OG seems to be a reoccurring issue when I brew. Someone help!
Could it have been mash temp or diastatic issue with older malts? What was your dough in temp and sacc temp?
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