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Old 10-14-2010, 02:36 AM   #251
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Originally Posted by DKershner View Post
Another chestnut beer tasted, and this one had interesting results. This one was a Light Ale.
That is odd, but what other piece of the recipe could contribute that? I've always associated sorghum with a metallic twang...


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Old 10-14-2010, 03:23 PM   #252
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lcasanova View Post
That is odd, but what other piece of the recipe could contribute that? I've always associated sorghum with a metallic twang...
No idea...maybe something about the yeast reacting to a greater amount of simple sugars? The cidery taste people describe when using too much table sugar?


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Old 07-07-2011, 02:18 AM   #253
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I know this thread has been inactive for a while, so here's hoping that someone still reads this. I just started brewing gluten free beer for me and my girlfriend. The first batch was a failure, not the fault of the chestnut chips, but some bad hops. I'm trying to figure out how people are getting their beers to be so clear or if there's something I'm doing wrong. It's too expensive to keep making these mistakes . What techniques are people using and what ingredients are people using to create a clear beer?

Besides the first failed batch, my second batch is a gluten free blueberry beer, which is currently aging in my 5L keg. A test-bottle that I opened last weekend after 10 days in the primary, 14 days in the secondary, and 7 days bottle conditioning was still a bit young. I used 1 tsp of pectinase during the mash but the end product looked like muddy water. In the last 15 minutes of the boil I added 1oz of irish moss. By time I siphoned it to the primary, it was still pretty cloudy.

The last batch I did things a little different. The pectinase was the same during the mash. I "primed" the irish moss this time in a couple tablespoons of water. I added 1oz at 30min of the boil and another 1oz in the last 15min. I am cold crashing for 48 hours in the fridge at ~35F prior to kegging. I'll know tomorrow for certain what the results of this batch will be, but I'm optimistic.

Any help would be greatly appreciated. I'm all on board to brew GF chestnut beer, but it's difficult to relax and have a homebrew when I keep making new variations of the same mistake over and over.
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Old 07-07-2011, 04:35 AM   #254
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I've done 2 chestnut brews. both using fresh picked chestnuts that I've chipped and oven roasted. i've just bottled the second brew a couple weeks ago and it still looks like water from the Murry.
for my second brew i used gelatin fining and cold crashed for 2 weeks at -2C (28F) and it still looked like mud.
my first brew was a proof of concept and only 3ltrs (3.2quarts) and i didn't do anything it still had hops floating around when i bottled it.
anyway here's my advise, TIME. box them up and put them away, the longer the better, don't even think about opening one for 3 months and when you can't wait any long put some in the fridge and wait longer (2 weeks) and then marvel at the difference.
the hops infused mud i first bottled looked, smelted, and tasted fantastic after 6 months (as long as you were careful on the pore, no cold crash etc before bottling meant there was a very thick layer of crap on the bottom of the bottle)
hopefully someone else can give you a faster clearing method, but if you ask me you should age your beer that long anyway.


I've never tried this on a large scale, but I've noticed that if you freeze the beer solid then let it defrost it clears up in a day or two. This will kill the yeast so you will have bring it up to temp and re-pitch to bottle or just keg.
if you still have that first brew and a deep freezer it might be worth experimenting.
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Old 07-13-2011, 10:55 AM   #255
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I've never made a gluten free beer that came out clear, but then I never really tried very hard either. I've never been bothered by cloudy beer and actually kind of like the idea of it being a little "hardier" and robust (I know this might just be me rationalizing, but hey...it works). But like opm said, after some time aging a bit and in the fridge, a lot of the solids drop out.

Good luck.
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Old 05-18-2012, 02:29 AM   #256
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Default GF Stout with Lee's dark roasted nuts

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Old 05-18-2012, 04:39 AM   #257
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As I learn more about homebrewing, I learn that that it takes a good 3 months for the beers to condition to proper flavor. From what I have studied, this holds true for gluten free beers as well. Or even more so. Four months is sounding more like what they need. I chose the dark roast to be ready for the early fall season as a celebration of the coming winter. Welcome to fall...BANG! -> in your face deep winter stout. That is what I'm talking about! I will mix it up, I promise. A nice amber as my next batch might just be the thing.

There are some considerations from what I have read about chestnuts when it comes to beer. Number one, it has a low fat content, which is good for beer AND as a food source. Oils will kill the head of your beer. The main consideration is that chestnuts do not have the amylase enzymes on their husks to convert the starches to fermentable sugars. This process takes about an hour with barley. For the chestnuts the recommended mash time is 24 hours. I am assuming that it is this long because of the size of the ground nut so that the water and enzymes have enough time to soak in and penetrate into the nut itself. Questions arise in my head about the grain size and whether or not that can be modified as the 24 hour mash time can be a bit troublesome for people. For me, not so much. I chose to add amylase and pectinase for the mash. Pectins will cloud the beer and keep it from looking like beer, even though it's not beer but we want it to resemble beer. That part is for presentation. It's not necessary.
I've also read that these beers can be overpowered by the hops, do I dialed them back a bit. The oils in nuts can reduce head retention, so I decided to use my mash tun instead of a steeping bag in the kettle. When using the mash tun, the oils floating on the surface can get trapped in the surface of the grist in the tun and be reduced somewhat not making it to the kettle. Some folks were getting a very dry high alcohol content with no sweetness at all to the beer or body. So I added chocolate nibs and goodly amounts of maltodextrin and lactose which are unfermentable sugars that have mild sweetness and I added a good amount of sugar, much more than most people were adding because I've read that the amounts of fermentable sugars from the chestnuts have been coming out low for many people. Whether that is the chemistry of the nut, the extraction process that the brewer used or a combination of both is kind of a grey area for me now until I get deep into some science of the nut itself. The lactose will make it more complex and I believe the maltodextrins will aid in head retention as well. So these two ingredients seem to be the backbone of Chestnut beer in my early opinion of brewing this batch. It's only my first batch so my opinion can be ****e at this point. I also used Gypsum to help balance the pH. I'm not sure what the best pH is for chestnut brew and amylase/pectinase, but our city water has a good amount of Calcium (gypsum) anyway, but I put it in just in case. It didn't raise the pH any (constant 5.4) but it may have kept it from lowering. Many people encounter a very muddy beer when finished so I also added much more whirfloc and irish moss to the boil as well as pectinase to the primary fermenter. Something called cold crashing will help with this also. Personally, after 4 months in the bottle it will probably all settle out anyway, but at least with the extras that I put in, I can drink a few before then. We will see. Hopefully they wont taint the flavor any. Again, time heals all wounds.

So this is what I did:

Heat 6.5 gallon of declorinated (sat over night) tap water to 180F. Transferred to mash tun with the Chestnuts already placed in there. It was 175F so I waited until it dropped and proceeded to:

Got my yeast starter going with 16oz water 2 tbsp demerara sugar and 1/4 tsp yeast nutrient

The mash temp after an hour was 170, I let it drop a little more then added:
2.5 tsp amylase
2.o tsp pectinase
2.o tsp gypsum
pH 5.4
3 hours later it was 155F
10 hours later it was 130F
21 hours later it was 105F

It tasted slightly sweet, chocolatey, and mildly roasty. YUM! I did not take a hydrometer reading, but it was only mildly sweet. I may have added the amylase to the mash when it was too hot. It's OK, I added so much sugar afterward that it will be nice.

At this point my yeast starter was really slowing down so 'EFF IT' I added another packet to the starter.

{Linton Kewesi Johnson, Dread Beat and Blood}

So here is the recipe:

Boil Wort
60 min 0.5 oz Fuggles
45 min 0.5 oz Kent Goldings
30 min 0.5 oz Fuggles
10 min 0.5 oz Kent Goldings
Dissolved solution of:
1 gallon of water
3.0 oz molasses
3.0 lb Demerara Sugar
2.0 lb Turbinado Sugar
5.o oz Malto Dextrin
10 oz Lactose
3 Whirfloc Tablets
2 tsp Irish Moss
1/2 cup Chestnut coffee

Chilled to 78F
Strained through a grain bag pitched with a total of 2 oz Nottingham yeast (one in the starter, one hydrated in the started 1 hour before pitching)
2 tsp pectinase straight from the bottle.
Ferment started 6 hours later
24 hours later, no krausen but a decent ferment at 70F ( I put frozen water bottles around the base of the fermenter because the yeast works best at 65F)

Secondary Ferment add 4 oz chocolate nibs

So that is the most intricate recipe that I have attempted thus far. I almost lost track of some things at times, but made it through. The next step is to remember the 4 oz chocolate nibs for the secondary fermenter.

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Old 05-18-2012, 04:46 AM   #258
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Hey all. Sorry about that informal first post. It was taken from my blog. A little weird, to read if you didn't know that.

I have a gluten intolerance and am trying new ideas and have found this thread most illuminating! Thanks to you all for sharing your info and thank you very much Lee for all that you have done for chestnuts! So far, I am impressed big time! I'm looking for feedback as well as how you all are fairing with your chestnut and gluten free recipes. I am dying to learn more. Literally. I love real beer, but it kills my intestinal villi. I'm in pain right now! ha ha ha

anyway, thanks everyone, thank you Lee!

Sean
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Old 05-19-2012, 10:10 PM   #259
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Wow, great post Sean. And I can't wait to hear how it turned out.
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Old 05-21-2012, 02:02 PM   #260
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I discovered I cannot tolerate gluten a month or so back either from an intolerance or some kind of allergy. I've been drinking hard ciders and wine, but I simply love beer, especially homebrewed beer. I have done all grain, and the idea of stuck with a sorghum twang didn't excite me.

I am super excited by this thread.

To get my feet wet I am going to try the following. Let me know if I am missing anything.

For a 5 gallon batch:
5# light roasted chestnut chips
3# corn sugar
Nottingham Yeast
1 oz Chinook @ 60 minutes
1 oz Cascade @ 20 minutes
2 oz Cascade dry hopped.


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