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Old 01-19-2010, 07:09 PM   #21
HairyDogBrewing
 
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Give me an Erlenmeyer flask, any day.
I personally get off on the MSF (Mad Science Factor).
And I'm told that I look downright sexy holding a bit of lab equipment.
Wouldn't trade that for a jelly jar. ;-)

 
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Old 01-19-2010, 07:59 PM   #22
JoeJones
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I understand where you’re coming from, but I respectfully disagree on a few points.

First, the O2 exchange happens at the surface of the liquid, not at the bottom. So the wide base of a flask has noting to do with it. In fact, the neck of the flask is tapered so that there is actually less surface area to exchange gases freely when compared to a 1g jug, growler, whatever. This is especially true when you’re using a 2L flask to make a 2L starter because the flask is nearly full to the top.
Second, the opening on a gallon jug and a flask are basically the same size. Actually, the openings on the flasks in my lab are bigger than the opening of a gallon jug. Not that that really matters. How much is exposed when you use an Ale Pail…
Finally, why does everyone keep talking about sterilizing? Why would you autoclave your flask when every other piece of equipment used for brewing is sanitized, not sterilized.

I get the idea of it looking cool and all, but right now I’m a poor grad college student looking strictly at functionality. Back to one of my original points, a 1g jug is ¼ the price of a new flask. Hell a 2 quart mason jar I probably less than that.

 
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Old 01-19-2010, 08:02 PM   #23
Hillbilly_Bill
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SpanishCastleAle View Post
I was just thinking the same thing this weekend but for a different reason. Since many people use foil, flasks are known to foam-over easily, and we want a free exchange of air; why not just use a beaker? Seems a beaker would foam-over a LOT less easily AND we get a better exchange of air. So...why flasks?
Only if you are using a flask that is too small.

 
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Old 01-19-2010, 08:04 PM   #24
Hillbilly_Bill
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pjj2ba View Post
No reason not to use a beaker or whatever as long as you can sterilize it and keep it that way.

In the lab we use flasks because they are easy to "seal" and when on a shaker, the faster you rotate them the more the liquid "climbs" up the walls of the container. The tapered walls of the flask help to prevent this and keep the culture from spraying out the top when shaking at higher rpms.
bump!
+12345

 
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Old 01-19-2010, 08:19 PM   #25
Bsquared
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeJones View Post
I understand where you’re coming from, but I respectfully disagree on a few points.

First, the O2 exchange happens at the surface of the liquid, not at the bottom. So the wide base of a flask has noting to do with it. In fact, the neck of the flask is tapered so that there is actually less surface area to exchange gases freely when compared to a 1g jug, growler, whatever. This is especially true when you’re using a 2L flask to make a 2L starter because the flask is nearly full to the top.
Second, the opening on a gallon jug and a flask are basically the same size. Actually, the openings on the flasks in my lab are bigger than the opening of a gallon jug. Not that that really matters. How much is exposed when you use an Ale Pail…
Finally, why does everyone keep talking about sterilizing? Why would you autoclave your flask when every other piece of equipment used for brewing is sanitized, not sterilized.
First of all, if you are filling the flask all the way up, you are using too small of a flask. A 2L flask is good for 1L starters, a 4L is for 2L and a 6L is for 4L. Personally I use my 6L flask most of the time even with 2L starters. This way the wort is vary shallow and gets good gas exchange. The opening does not mater for gas exchange because gases move vary readily from through any opening of a flask or a jar.

I like to autoclave just to give my self a fresh start, I do make Brett starters, and like to keep that out of my regular brewing.

but like I said, you can use what ever works for you, but I'll keep working with my flasks.

 
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Old 01-19-2010, 08:59 PM   #26
Scimmia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeJones View Post
I get the idea of it looking cool and all, but right now I’m a poor grad college student looking strictly at functionality. Back to one of my original points, a 1g jug is ¼ the price of a new flask. Hell a 2 quart mason jar I probably less than that.
From a purely functional viewpoint, a flask is certainly not necessary. It's a convenience; worth it for some people, but may not be for others. Hell, for me the simple fact of having less stuff to clean up makes it well worth the $9 my last 2L flask cost me.

 
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