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Old 01-22-2010, 06:59 PM   #11
bknifefight
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Are you trying to make it a little darker with the Amber DME and dark candi sugar?

Here's what I would throw together for a Belgian Strong Ale or tripel:
8-9 lbs of Pilsen DME
2 lbs Cane Sugar (it's the same as clear candi sugar but MUCH cheaper)
Some Saaz and Hallertau hops.
Belgian Strong Ale Yeast
It'll be nice and light and dry with good yeast spice. Just my two cents.


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Old 01-22-2010, 07:34 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bknifefight View Post
Are you trying to make it a little darker with the Amber DME and dark candi sugar?

Here's what I would throw together for a Belgian Strong Ale or tripel:
8-9 lbs of Pilsen DME
2 lbs Cane Sugar (it's the same as clear candi sugar but MUCH cheaper)
Some Saaz and Hallertau hops.
Belgian Strong Ale Yeast
It'll be nice and light and dry with good yeast spice. Just my two cents.
That sounds about perfect but I think he's trying to make a DARK strong. This thread is about a dark strong, right?

I would start with the pilsner extract as a base
1 lb table sugar
1 lb dark Belgian candy sugar. (this comes as a syrup that you can get at any good HBS don't use the rock candy crap)
Special B (very important)
Aromatic
maybe a touch of chocolate malt
German hops
Belgian yeast

Definitely make a big starter. use the calculator on the mr malty site. Even with a stir plate the starter for this style will be huge. With out a stir plate your probably better off pitching on to the cake of a previous batch. Perhaps make a lower strength Belgian pale ale and use the cake from that. Start the ferment slow at 64F then slowly raise the temp to 70F. Keep at 70F for the remainder of fermentation.


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Old 01-22-2010, 07:45 PM   #13
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I've brewed Belgian Dark Strong ales with 3 lbs of cane sugar. It works just fine IMO. The key is to feed the sugar incrementally after 5-7 days. It's less stressful to the yeast since they don't see the full gravity of the beer at once. Just boil the sugar in 2 cups of water per pound, chill it to the fermenting temperature and pour it in.
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Old 01-22-2010, 07:54 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EvilGnome6 View Post
I've brewed Belgian Dark Strong ales with 3 lbs of cane sugar. It works just fine IMO. The key is to feed the sugar incrementally after 5-7 days. It's less stressful to the yeast since they don't see the full gravity of the beer at once. Just boil the sugar in 2 cups of water per pound, chill it to the fermenting temperature and pour it in.
Right on! I think the extra sugar would be even more important with an extract batch to make sure it drys out and doesn't finish way high.

Also, adding some Munich extract would be a good idea to keep the malt profile rich.
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Old 01-22-2010, 08:16 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maida7 View Post
That sounds about perfect but I think he's trying to make a DARK strong. This thread is about a dark strong, right?

I would start with the pilsner extract as a base
1 lb table sugar
1 lb dark Belgian candy sugar. (this comes as a syrup that you can get at any good HBS don't use the rock candy crap)
Special B (very important)
Aromatic
maybe a touch of chocolate malt
German hops
Belgian yeast

Definitely make a big starter. use the calculator on the mr malty site. Even with a stir plate the starter for this style will be huge. With out a stir plate your probably better off pitching on to the cake of a previous batch. Perhaps make a lower strength Belgian pale ale and use the cake from that. Start the ferment slow at 64F then slowly raise the temp to 70F. Keep at 70F for the remainder of fermentation.
Do the Special B and Belgian Aromatic need to be mashed or can they be steeped?
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Old 01-22-2010, 08:24 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bknifefight View Post
Do the Special B and Belgian Aromatic need to be mashed or can they be steeped?
steeped .
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Old 01-22-2010, 08:47 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maida7 View Post
Right on! I think the extra sugar would be even more important with an extract batch to make sure it drys out and doesn't finish way high.
My thoughts exactly. The beauty of a Belgian Dark Strong is that they finish dry and let the yeast shine through. Subbing out too much of the sugar for even more extract will make it way too sweet.
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Old 01-22-2010, 08:58 PM   #18
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Do you have a means for temperature control? I have found with my Quads and Triples that have a lot of simple sugars in them turnout a LOT better when I manage their fermentation Temp. I can keep the ester profile I like, but hold the hot alcohols to a minimum if it pitch a healthy starter at a higher pitching rate than ales(1.2X), at 64F and hold it there till fermentation gets going well (8-24hr) then raise the temp 1F every 24hr till you get to 72-76 then you can hold it there, or if you taste it and think it needs cleaning up, let it clime higher on its own.

IMO 90% of brewing is yeast management, any monkey can make good wort. It takes healthy yeast to make good beer.
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Old 01-22-2010, 09:08 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bsquared View Post
Do you have a means for temperature control? I have found with my Quads and Triples that have a lot of simple sugars in them turnout a LOT better when I manage their fermentation Temp. I can keep the ester profile I like, but hold the hot alcohols to a minimum if it pitch a healthy starter at a higher pitching rate than ales(1.2X), at 64F and hold it there till fermentation gets going well (8-24hr) then raise the temp 1F every 24hr till you get to 72-76 then you can hold it there, or if you taste it and think it needs cleaning up, let it clime higher on its own.

IMO 90% of brewing is yeast management, any monkey can make good wort. It takes healthy yeast to make good beer.
1 degree every 24 hours? I don't have that kind of control. What do you use? I just have a small room that stays at 68 and a brew belt if I need it.
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Old 01-22-2010, 09:26 PM   #20
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A freezer chest wired to a Ranco ETC (best investment I ever made).

Yeast generate a lot of heat that needs to be dissipated during the first few day of fermentation, especially when there are a lot of simple sugars to mow through.They will generate a lot of solvent like flavors that take a long time to dissipate if the fermentation Temp gets too high early in fermentation when the yeast are expanding. If you can at least try and keep the below 68 for the first three to four days, by putting the fermenter in a tray of water with some towels rapped around the fermenter to wick the water up the sides of the fermenter, and a fan blowing on it. Kinda like a make shift swamp cooler.


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