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Old 01-16-2010, 04:19 AM   #1
pjewell
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Dec 2009
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I really enjoy the garden. I grow tomatoes, peppers, corn, egg plant, and all the wonderful bounty that exists on Earth.

One thing that is missing is hops. So I researched for a bit and its best to start hops by a rhizome (root) because it takes several seasons to start producing.

I am new to brewing as well. So my question to you is, what are a few hop varieties that you cannot live without or what are a few that are well rounded that can go into many different beers?



 
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Old 01-16-2010, 05:18 AM   #2
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It really depends on the beer you make.

A lot of people like the citrusy flavor of Cascades. If your taste is more English style beers, you might consider Fuggles, Goldings, etc....

I planted my hops in large pots. It really only takes about two seasons for them to get going. And with some hops and the right conditions, you can get a good amount first year.

So plant the hops that will fit the type of beers you make.


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Old 01-16-2010, 05:45 AM   #3
KhellendrosXS
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If I were to buy and plant it would be

Cascade
Centennial
Fuggle
everything else
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Old 01-16-2010, 05:52 AM   #4
frolickingmonkey
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I agree with McBrew's main point about planting hops that will fit with the styles that you make most often so that you can really utilize your own hops in your brewery. Since you're new to homebrewing and probably haven't quite figured out what your favorite styles are yet, my recommendation is to plant three or four varieties that work with different styles:

1. American hop (Cascade, Centennial, etc)
2. Noble hop (Hallertauer, Tettnang, Saaz)
3. British hop (Golding, Fuggle)
4. High alpha (Nugget, Magnum, etc)

By planting a few different varieties of hops, you're not limited in using your homegrown hops to explore brewing different beer styles as you get deeper into homebrewing. You'll be able to brew classic American and British ales, German lagers, and even Belgian brews, too.

Personally, I planted Cascade, Willamette (American hop, but a British character to it), and Nugget last spring, which I can use in the bitters, pales, browns, porters, stouts I tend to brew most often. I've started getting into German lagers this winter (since it's been cold enough for me to ghetto lager) and am considering planting one variety of Noble hop this year to help fill that niche in my brewery.
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Old 01-16-2010, 06:35 AM   #5
pjewell
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frolickingmonkey View Post

1. American hop (Cascade, Centennial, etc)
2. Noble hop (Hallertauer, Tettnang, Saaz)
3. British hop (Golding, Fuggle)
4. High alpha (Nugget, Magnum, etc)

By planting a few different varieties of hops, you're not limited in using your homegrown hops to explore brewing different beer styles as you get deeper into homebrewing. You'll be able to brew classic American and British ales, German lagers, and even Belgian brews, too.

Personally, I planted Cascade, Willamette (American hop, but a British character to it), and Nugget last spring, which I can use in the bitters, pales, browns, porters, stouts I tend to brew most often. I've started getting into German lagers this winter (since it's been cold enough for me to ghetto lager) and am considering planting one variety of Noble hop this year to help fill that niche in my brewery.


I read about magnum and they sound great because of their storage and general character. Willamette is great. So aromatic.

 
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Old 01-16-2010, 11:40 AM   #6
Hillbilly_Bill
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frolickingmonkey View Post
I agree with McBrew's main point about planting hops that will fit with the styles that you make most often so that you can really utilize your own hops in your brewery. Since you're new to homebrewing and probably haven't quite figured out what your favorite styles are yet, my recommendation is to plant three or four varieties that work with different styles:

1. American hop (Cascade, Centennial, etc)
2. Noble hop (Hallertauer, Tettnang, Saaz)
3. British hop (Golding, Fuggle)
4. High alpha (Nugget, Magnum, etc)

By planting a few different varieties of hops, you're not limited in using your homegrown hops to explore brewing different beer styles as you get deeper into homebrewing. You'll be able to brew classic American and British ales, German lagers, and even Belgian brews, too.

Personally, I planted Cascade, Willamette (American hop, but a British character to it), and Nugget last spring, which I can use in the bitters, pales, browns, porters, stouts I tend to brew most often. I've started getting into German lagers this winter (since it's been cold enough for me to ghetto lager) and am considering planting one variety of Noble hop this year to help fill that niche in my brewery.
I hear that Willamette is very tricky (difficult) to grow... could you share your experience growing this hop and maybe any tips to help grow Willamette?

 
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Old 01-16-2010, 11:43 AM   #7
Hillbilly_Bill
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KhellendrosXS View Post
If I were to buy and plant it would be

Cascade
Centennial
Fuggle
everything else
Aren't Cascade and Centennial very similar tasting hops? I hear that Centennial is sometimes referred to as "Super Cascade."

 
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Old 01-16-2010, 02:07 PM   #8
KhellendrosXS
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hillbilly_Bill View Post
Aren't Cascade and Centennial very similar tasting hops? I hear that Centennial is sometimes referred to as "Super Cascade."
So far from what Ive gotten both online and from the LHBS the Centennial are at least 3% different in their AA. I use a lot of both though.
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Old 01-16-2010, 02:33 PM   #9
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Cascade and Centennial have similar oil profiles.

One consideration for hop growing is how damp your area is during the summer. Some hops are vulnerable to molds and mildews. hopcultivars
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Old 01-16-2010, 03:52 PM   #10
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I planted a bunch of strains in front of my house then had to move away for a while. Unfortunately the only one to grow turns out to be only a male plant, no buds. It looks beautiful climbing up my porch though. Plant multiple Rhizomes for this possibility.

One thing to consider is your alpha acid content may vary to the point you can't predict its contribution to the bitterness of your brew. You can have it tested to determine the alpha acid of a seasons crop but it will cost quite a bit from what i remember. If you are particular about the bitterness you are shooting for you may be better buying bittering hops with a known AA, then using yours for flavor and aroma. Or you can just experiment making batches until you get it right.



 
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