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Old 01-16-2010, 01:32 PM   #21
bendavanza
 
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How about the liquid foam insulation? The 2 part stuff would be easier to pour in the spots.

 
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Old 01-16-2010, 04:30 PM   #22
Fritztheelephant
 
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antiqueappliances.com has parts and discusses their restoration process. I'm inbterested in your process as I have a vintage Philco fridge I'm converting.

 
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Old 01-16-2010, 04:48 PM   #23
89OctaneStang
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bendavanza View Post
How about the liquid foam insulation? The 2 part stuff would be easier to pour in the spots.
I thought about that. It would honestly be easier to get liquid insulation down into the walls than batt insulation.

Anyone see why this wouldn't work?

 
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Old 01-16-2010, 05:03 PM   #24
Flyin
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Should work good, just watch out for the expanding foam.

 
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Old 01-17-2010, 06:22 AM   #25
89OctaneStang
 
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Did some research on the liquid insulation. As it will most definately provide the best R value over batt insulation, I am not sure if it will actually work for my project.

I would have to spray it into the wall from the top down. There is no guarantee that I will get everything inside the wall covered and in the attempt to get it all in there, I will face a possible problem with getting it all over the coolant lines and interior wall face. Thinking about that, it could pose a few problems. It will definately work the best to keep the heat and elements outside the walls, but I am afraid that if I try it I will get it all over the place and it will also keep the refrigerant inside the walls instead of into the freezer. Does this make sense or am I looking into it too much?

 
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Old 01-17-2010, 03:46 PM   #26
Fritztheelephant
 
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You should be ablt to attach a piece of tubing to the foam applicator and drop that to the bottom of the cavity. Fill some.. let it expand upward..fill more on top. Research cavity fill for existing structures and you will see the process for filling existing home walls with expanding foam...should be same process.

I agree that you may not want to completely encase the cooling tubes. Is there a way to segregate the space and fill only between the tubes and outside wall?

 
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Old 01-18-2010, 12:34 AM   #27
89OctaneStang
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fritztheelephant View Post
You should be ablt to attach a piece of tubing to the foam applicator and drop that to the bottom of the cavity. Fill some.. let it expand upward..fill more on top. Research cavity fill for existing structures and you will see the process for filling existing home walls with expanding foam...should be same process.

I agree that you may not want to completely encase the cooling tubes. Is there a way to segregate the space and fill only between the tubes and outside wall?
Not really. The void is about 3" thick but it has a few coolant lines running in and out that would keep me from sliding a thin rigid material in between the outside walls and coolant lines. I think my best bet is going to be batt insulation.

Ideally, I would like to take the shell off from around the internal hardware and do everything that way. But I don't know anyone around here that is good at welding. The shell is spot welded together and to the base. If I had the shell off, I could do a lot more to it.


 
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Old 01-19-2010, 04:39 PM   #28
ajwillys
 
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What about loose fill or cellulose insulation? Would that provide the necessary R-value? It looks like the R-value is about R 3.6 to 3.8 per inch. It should be easy enough to get in there without the mess of expanding foam.

Nice project!

 
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Old 01-19-2010, 05:29 PM   #29
BigWhitey_FrostBox
 
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I love this project I got a new seal for my '52 International Harvester refrigerator from antiqueappliances.com. They're nice folks and about the only place I could find information on the old stuff! Hopefully, I'll get around to repainting my refrigerator soon. Here are a few pics of my project.

Original instruction sheet still inside the door!

 
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Old 01-19-2010, 09:19 PM   #30
89OctaneStang
 
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WOW.. Yours has a lot more rust than mine. What year is it? Did it have the same or similar smell to it that I described about mine?

Well... Gonna rip out the old insulation right now and get an even better look at what I am dealing with. Will post up more pics here soon!

 
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