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Old 01-14-2010, 12:06 PM   #1
valicious
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Nov 2009
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How could I go about thickening up a beer to the point where it's extremely viscous? Would I just add less water and more grains when mashing? Or would I just increase the boil time so that more water boils off?

I had a family member request that I brew a batch that poured really thick, and you almost need to "chew on it" when drinking :P (I don't want a sludge, just a little thicker than even the biggest stouts)

This is my first recipe, and I'm only so far as designing the grain bill. I haven't decided on the hops yet, I'm just trying to get a list of what to order. (since I have like 20 pounds of hops in my freezer)

For grains I was thinking (5hal batch)

20lbs Maris Otter
8lbs Caramunich III
2lbs Flaked Rye
2lbs De-Husked Carafa III
2lbs De-Bittered Black
1lbs Chocolate Malt
0.75lbs Special B
WLP099 Super High Gravity Ale or Wyeast 1764 Pacman

Is there enough Caramunich and Rye Flakes in there to give it a really thick body? Is 20lbs Maris Otter enough to convert all the specialty grains?
I'm thinking about a longer mash time and a 90 minute boil as well.


 
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Old 01-14-2010, 03:08 PM   #2
riverfrontbrewer
 
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The longer you boil, the more concentrated (and carmelized) you are going to make your wort. If this sounds like what you want maybe boil for an hour then start your 60 min boil/hop additions? This would thicken it up....not sure what it may do to the flavor though. Repost on here to let us know what you do and how it comes out!

No choc malt in there?

Good Luck!

 
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Old 01-14-2010, 03:47 PM   #3
Oldsock
 
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Flaked rye is even higher in beta-glucans than oats, a pound or two will really thicken up the body. A few more things you can do for extra body include, low carbonation (prime to <2 volumes of CO2), high OG (extra base malt), and a high FG (carapils and a high mash temp).

Don't go too heavy on the Special B, the flavor can get overbearing at higher levels, say >1 lb (although people argume over what that level is).
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Old 01-15-2010, 02:53 PM   #4
valicious
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Nov 2009
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I updated the OP with what I'm thinking for a grain bill. I'm placing a big oder at Brewmasters Warehouse today for a bunch of equipment, and I'm hoping to include this in my order.
First original recipe *crosses fingers*

 
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Old 01-15-2010, 03:04 PM   #5
bbrim
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A little malto-dextrine is an easy way to add some body. That beer will be huge with that much grain. If you hit 50% eff for a 5 gal batch that is OG 1.121. I would think about something more along these lines for 5 gal:
7.5 lbs Maris Otter
1 lbs flaked oats
.75 lbs roast barley
.5 lbs choc malt
.5 lbs maltodextrine

and hops between 30-50 IBU (to your taste)
I would mash at 158 and you will get a thick stout.

 
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Old 01-15-2010, 04:04 PM   #6
conpewter
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A stout that big will take forever to age out from all the alcohol content, and might be too sweet to boot. I'd think about doing a closer to normal gravity on the beer and add malto-dextrin. It adds a lot of mouthfeel and body to the beer without a lot of sweetness.
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Old 01-15-2010, 04:06 PM   #7
valicious
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Nov 2009
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I remember reading that Maris Otter has the ability to convert it's own starchs to sugars, but will also have some left over for specialty grains as well. In looking at recipes for IIPAs, RISs, and other really high-gravity beers, having 20-25 or more pounds of grain isn't uncommon. I just brewed an IIPA that used 23 pounds of grain.
Won't caramunich and carapils both increase the beer's body?

I'll add some malto-dextrine to the mix too. Would about 1lbs be right? (going for really thick here)
For yeast, I'm thinking WLP099 - Super High Gravity Ale or Wyeast 1764 Pacman.

 
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Old 01-15-2010, 04:19 PM   #8
bbrim
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I don't think you need to add malto dextrine as well if you are using all those specialty grains. If you re going to go ahead with a beer that big you need to get a serious yeast plan going. I would look for a yeast that can handle 15% alcohol and make a huge starter.

 
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Old 01-15-2010, 04:27 PM   #9
valicious
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bbrim View Post
I don't think you need to add malto dextrine as well if you are using all those specialty grains. If you re going to go ahead with a beer that big you need to get a serious yeast plan going. I would look for a yeast that can handle 15% alcohol and make a huge starter.
That's why I was thinking the WLP099. You need to pitch a LOT of yeast, so I was thinking of making a starter, then splitting that one up and growing two from it.
From AHS's site:
  • Aerate very heavily, 4 times as much as with a normal gravity beer, because less oxygen dissolves into solution at high gravity.
  • Pitch 3-4 times as much yeast as normal.
  • Aerate intermittently during the first 5 days of fermentation. This will help yeast cells during a very difficult fermentation. Aerate with oxygen for 30 seconds or air for 5-10 minutes.
  • Higher nutrient levels can allow yeast to tolerate higher alcohol levels. Use 2 times the normal nutrient level. This is especially important when using WLP099 to make wine and mead, which have almost no nutrient level to begin with.
  • Do not start with the entire wort sugar at once. Begin fermentation with a wort that would produce a 6-8% beer, and add wort (it can be concentrated) each day during the first 5 days. This can be done in combination with the necessary aeration. This step is mandatory to achieve 25% ABV.
  • Attenuation: >80%
  • Flocculation: Medium
  • Optimum Fermentation Temperature: 65-69 F (18-20.5 C)
  • Alcohol Tolerance: +15%

 
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Old 01-15-2010, 04:44 PM   #10
jjp36
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If this was me, I'm not sure id want a beer that fully fermented with the super high gravity yeast. I think its known more for its attenuation and alcohol tolerance than its flavor.

I'd ferment with fairly neutral strain like S-04 or US-05 and then pitch a big starter of the 099 to finish it off.


 
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