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Old 12-30-2009, 01:07 AM   #1
Lodovico
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I'm new to the kegging game. This is my second keg on my new system. The first actually went off without a hitch. This one is giving me an issue.

The beer is an irish red and it's carbed to 12 PSI. I'm very happy with the level of carbonation on the beer once it settles. The issue is, everytime I pour a beer, I get 1 quick big burst of CO2 and the pour foams a ton from this one burst. After the burst, the rest of the pour is fine but it foams so much just from this 1 second.

Why am I getting this one quick burst everytime I pour a beer??

I actually have a second question that I don't want to start a second thread about.

How would this kegged beer hold up if I just poured it into the bottle and capped it in order to drink it later the same day?? I've read the "we don't need no stinking beer gun" thread, but I don't even want to go to that trouble.

Will the beer be flat if I pour from keg to bottle and then drink it later that day? Or should I just growler it because it will be consumed about 12 hours after it's poured? Thanks!
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Old 12-30-2009, 01:58 AM   #2
wildwest450
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You say it's carbed to 12 psi, what does that mean? Beer is carbonated by two factors, temp and psi, we need to know the exact beer temp.

 
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Old 12-30-2009, 01:58 AM   #3
Bobby_M
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Your tubing and faucet are warmer than the beer in the keg so all the CO2 inside that area comes out of solution and rises up to the highest point. You open the faucet and that's what you get. Put a constantly running computer fan in there or a small clip on desk fan to keep the air circulating.
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Old 12-30-2009, 02:01 AM   #4
DavidP
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What kind of draft setup do you have? If your faucets & beer line are warmer than the fridge then CO2 will come out of solution in that beer and appear as extra foam for the first second of the pour. I get this effect with my tower.

 
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Old 12-30-2009, 12:44 PM   #5
shataway
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I am new to kegging also.

In the original post, Lodovico said that the first keg went without a hitch. I take that to mean his "system" is OK and the problem was introduced when the keg was changed.

If the second keg is a different one, maybe the problem is with it. I read on another thread that dip tube o-rings can leak which allow air to be drawn in while you are pouring a beer. I don't understand how this could be without beer leaking out.


I will try to figure out how to link to that thread...

Edit: Must have been an old thread. I could not find it. I believe on that thread the original poster came back and said that after replacing the oring, everything was good.


 
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Old 12-30-2009, 02:17 PM   #6
DavidP
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shataway View Post
I am new to kegging also.

In the original post, Lodovico said that the first keg went without a hitch. I take that to mean his "system" is OK and the problem was introduced when the keg was changed.

If the second keg is a different one, maybe the problem is with it. I read on another thread that dip tube o-rings can leak which allow air to be drawn in while you are pouring a beer. I don't understand how this could be without beer leaking out.


I will try to figure out how to link to that thread...

Edit: Must have been an old thread. I could not find it. I believe on that thread the original poster came back and said that after replacing the oring, everything was good.
If the o-ring was leaky then I would assume that the entire pour would be foamy. Also, with the beer in the diptube and line being under pressure rather than a vacuum I don't see how a bad o-ring would allow in air.

 
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