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Old 12-27-2009, 07:47 PM   #1
mikejamesnelson
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I have 5 gallons of cider that I started in September. I transfered it into a secondary a month later after fementation seemed to stop. I moved it into my brew cave under my stairs in my basement, and now im wondering if its too cold I live in Wisconsin, and its only in the low 50's down there. Is this going to have any kind of effect on the final produt? I want to let that cider age for another couple of months if I can! Any Comments?

 
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Old 12-27-2009, 09:27 PM   #2
ByCandleLightWinery
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Yes, it will affect your cider, but in a good way. A slower ferment has better flavors and can sometimes be sweeter depending on the juice (keeving). A lot of English craft ciders allow theirs to ferment outdoors, where it even freezes, and then thaws in the spring and starts fermenting again.

"In fact, a cool fermentation (ca 15° C) is generally preferred for cider and there is no need to keep the fermentation especially warm." http://www.cider.org.uk/part3.htm

Basically, you are just being like a wine maker and allowing it to take its time, and it will taste better because of it.

 
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Old 01-06-2010, 04:18 AM   #3
C2H5OH
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ByCandleLightWinery View Post
...A lot of English craft ciders allow theirs to ferment outdoors, where it even freezes, and then thaws in the spring and starts fermenting again.
I don't mean to sound like a contrarian, but I thought that if a brew freezes solid that the yeast would be killed off. (Rupture of yeast cell wall)


 
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Old 01-06-2010, 05:50 AM   #4
CandleWineProject
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Quote:
Originally Posted by C2H5OH View Post
I don't mean to sound like a contrarian, but I thought that if a brew freezes solid that the yeast would be killed off. (Rupture of yeast cell wall)

Quite alright. I was confused about cold crashing that all the beer makers suggest here. "How can that happen when freezing doesn't kill yeast?" Because this is not beer, so the same rules do not apply. That's why some of us keep mentioning chemicals to kill off yeasts in cider.

 
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Old 01-06-2010, 08:38 AM   #5
Teromous
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikejamesnelson View Post
I have 5 gallons of cider that I started in September. I transfered it into a secondary a month later after fementation seemed to stop. I moved it into my brew cave under my stairs in my basement, and now im wondering if its too cold I live in Wisconsin, and its only in the low 50's down there. Is this going to have any kind of effect on the final produt? I want to let that cider age for another couple of months if I can! Any Comments?
If fermentation has completed, you should have no problems with your cider.

 
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Old 01-06-2010, 01:18 PM   #6
C2H5OH
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CandleWineProject View Post
Quite alright. I was confused about cold crashing that all the beer makers suggest here. "How can that happen when freezing doesn't kill yeast?" Because this is not beer, so the same rules do not apply. That's why some of us keep mentioning chemicals to kill off yeasts in cider.
After realizing most (if not all) dry yeast is freeze-dried, your statement definitively holds water.

Thanks for getting me thinking about this.


 
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Old 01-07-2010, 01:20 AM   #7
cider_erp
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I think that freezing perhaps doesn't kill yeast dead, but that cold temperatures cause it to fall dormant. The commercial yeasts (as in beer) don't wake up again (unless prodded), but natural yeasts found in cider are very vigorous - unpasteurized cider will spontaneously ferment in the fridge all the way down to freezing. I have a mess in my crisper attesting to this (PET cider jug ruptured at the seam after 2 months at 36*F)

 
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Old 01-07-2010, 02:09 AM   #8
CandleWineProject
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cider_erp View Post
I think that freezing perhaps doesn't kill yeast dead, but that cold temperatures cause it to fall dormant. The commercial yeasts (as in beer) don't wake up again (unless prodded), but natural yeasts found in cider are very vigorous - unpasteurized cider will spontaneously ferment in the fridge all the way down to freezing. I have a mess in my crisper attesting to this (PET cider jug ruptured at the seam after 2 months at 36*F)
Dormant is a very good way of putting it.

I'm starting to come around to the idea that cider could be cold crashed if made with ale yeasts, but I haven't tried it, nor have I heard anything from the Cider Workshop on the topic. When they add yeast instead of going natural ferment, they use wine yeasts, which I also think do not cold crashing which is why they never mention it, even in one of the member's books. They only talk about chemicals or pasturizing for sweet cider, and suggest you learn to like it dry because it is waaay easier to make it dry.

 
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