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Old 10-12-2006, 01:38 AM   #1
Evets
 
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OK, I've done two AG brews so far, but I never really concidered the mash out phase. I use a 10g cooler as the MLT and what I did was boil about a gallon of first runnings during vorlauf and pour it back just before I began sparging. I use a "Phils Sparger". However, I don't think this really raises the grain temp enough for a proper mash out. Should I instead, after mashing, pour everything in the kettle and heat to 170 and then pour back to the cooler and sparge?
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Old 10-12-2006, 01:49 AM   #2
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If you want to do a mashout, you can just use about a gallon less mash water and then add 1 gallon of boiling water at mashout. If you have promash you can do the numbers exactly to get the proper temps but if not, that will get you close.
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Old 10-12-2006, 02:50 AM   #3
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Don't bother putting the mash into the kettle just for getting it to mash-out. It's not worth the hassle.

Either add more boiling water at the end, like MrSalty said, or boil more of your first runnings and put them back into the mash.

Kai

 
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Old 10-12-2006, 12:07 PM   #4
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Either solution should work fine, but if your sparge is anything like mine (slow), you will find that the water cools considerably as it travels through the tubing and the sparge arm, resulting in a considerable temperature loss by the time it hits the grain bed. I now use 190 degree water added to an unheated cooler to keep the sparge at 168 - 170 degrees. It is worth experimenting a bit to get the right temperature.

-a.

 
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Old 10-12-2006, 02:10 PM   #5
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A mash-out only matters if you are trying to stop the mash at a precise level of sweetness. Considering most homebrewers mash for an hour and modern grains convert in 20-30 minutes, all a mash-out is doing is diluting the first runnings a little. This useful, but not necessary.
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Old 10-12-2006, 09:43 PM   #6
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Thanx guys. I'll use some of your tips, for sure, but for the most part, I won't lose much sleep over it. You guys rock
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Old 10-12-2006, 10:56 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by david_42
A mash-out only matters if you are trying to stop the mash at a precise level of sweetness. Considering most homebrewers mash for an hour and modern grains convert in 20-30 minutes, all a mash-out is doing is diluting the first runnings a little. This useful, but not necessary.
That answers some questions, and brings up more?

SOoo, today us HB'ers use some of the dozens of different malts available to control our sugars- just over-mash and get exactly the sugar profile from the particular grain? Then, using hot water to sparge is just a way to get a good, hot rinse. But not too hot, tannins ya know.

I'd guess that a refractometer would aid in the 'mash out' process, but should I care? I've never seen a recipe that said "Mash til the refractometer reads 16.8 Brix, then IMMEDIATTLY mash out with 172 degree water" You'd have to be fast with the mash-out, no? Jack up the temp within a minute er two?
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Old 10-24-2006, 12:10 AM   #8
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There is one good think about a mash. There is not much need to rush anything when it comes to mashing grain. I had one that was mashing at 155F - 160F for over one hour, we hit it with hot water. The main thing is finding the right temps for your rig. My mash is at 155F if the hot laquar tank is at 170F. Mash out temp are at 170ish if Laquar is at 180F - 190F depends on the flow rates and the temp outside. But the end result is always the same for me 70% to 80%. I think if you had a great setup you might hit more.


But you know after 40 plus batches people say I'm crazy. I never check gravity after I check O.G., I only check the end on new recipes. I go on taste alone and no one has commented, other than to ask for the recipe and could I have one more!

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Old 10-24-2006, 01:01 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by david_42
A mash-out only matters if you are trying to stop the mash at a precise level of sweetness. Considering most homebrewers mash for an hour and modern grains convert in 20-30 minutes, all a mash-out is doing is diluting the first runnings a little. This useful, but not necessary.
This is true however, the other thing you are doing by raising the temp of the mash to 170 degrees is to make it less viscous so the sugars can release into the runnings easier.
I usually add about 2 gallons of my sparge water at about 190 degrees or so directly to the mash. This usually increases the temp to about 165 to 170 degrees.
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Old 10-25-2006, 07:51 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by david_42
A mash-out only matters if you are trying to stop the mash at a precise level of sweetness. Considering most homebrewers mash for an hour and modern grains convert in 20-30 minutes, all a mash-out is doing is diluting the first runnings a little. This useful, but not necessary.
I agree here, on the list of important things to remember when brewing, a mash out is pretty far down the list IMO.

 
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