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Old 11-17-2009, 07:22 PM   #1
sgrcltpunk
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ok so i have bottled my first batch and after 4 days i see alot of sediment in the bottom of the bottles, yeast im sure, how can i leave most of this behind so i can drink all the way to the bottom of the bottle? also its a little hazy looking through the bottle (hasn't been chilled) is this suspended yeast? or bad stuff

 
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Old 11-17-2009, 07:24 PM   #2
Edcculus
 
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Refrigerating it will compact the yeast. When you pour, do it gently and leave behind the yeast. To reduce it, a longer primary, or crash cooling are your best bets. The haze you see now is probably still yeast. 4 days in the bottle isn't a long time. Let them sit for at least 2 weeks, then refrigerate for a few days. Most or all of the haze should clear.

 
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Old 11-17-2009, 08:08 PM   #3
sgrcltpunk
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this batched finished fermenting in the primary after 4 days and then in the second it finished after 2 weeks and it is a lager of course i did it at ale temps is it a good idea to check the carbonation after 4 days with one of the more clear bottles?

 
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Old 11-17-2009, 08:12 PM   #4
buzzkill
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the best way to keep alot of junk out of the bottles is easy. when you think its ready to bottle,wait two more weeks.

 
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Old 11-17-2009, 08:13 PM   #5
sgrcltpunk
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Quote:
Originally Posted by buzzkill View Post
the best way to keep alot of junk out of the bottles is easy. when you think its ready to bottle,wait two more weeks.
haha ill keep that in mind with my dopplebock

 
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Old 11-17-2009, 08:16 PM   #6
Revvy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sgrcltpunk View Post
this batched finished fermenting in the primary after 4 days and then in the second it finished after 2 weeks and it is a lager of course i did it at ale temps is it a good idea to check the carbonation after 4 days with one of the more clear bottles?
No, it's best just to leave the bottles alone for 3 weeks at 70 degrees, that's the minimum time it takes for average gravity beers to carbonate and condition. Higher grav beers take longer.

Stouts and porters have taken me between 6 and 8 weeks to carb up..I have a 1.090 Belgian strong that took three months to carb up.


Everything you need to know about carbing and conditioning, can be found here Of Patience and Bottle Conditioning. With emphasis on the word, "patience."

As to sediment in bottles, unless you keg you will have sediment, it's part of the carbonation process, for bottle conditioned beers, both homebrew, and many many commercial microbrews. Just like how you have trub in the bottom of the fermentor, you will have sediment in the bottom of the bottles.

It's not to be hated, it's proof that you have made a living beer.

In fact the Belgian's practically worship it.

If you are interested in reading more about it, you can read this post of mine from awhile back, when someone else asked the question.

Yeast in Bottle information.

There's even a video on how to pour bottle conditioned beers leaving the sediment behind.
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Old 11-17-2009, 08:39 PM   #7
sgrcltpunk
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ok i see now i wasnt trying to avoid all yeast but just lessen the amount because it has about a quarter inch in the bottom of each bottle and i guess ill just have to wait to touch my brew it did ferment very fast so i am wondering if maybe it will be a little sooner than 3 weeks?

 
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Old 11-17-2009, 08:45 PM   #8
cheezydemon3
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Do NOT check after 4 days.

If it is carbonated, then you have way overprimed.

If it is flat (most likely) you have wasted 1 beer.

Wait at least until the 1 week mark.

When racking to secondary or bottling bucket, do not suck up the yeast at the bottom.

 
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Old 11-17-2009, 08:46 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sgrcltpunk View Post
ok i see now i wasnt trying to avoid all yeast but just lessen the amount because it has about a quarter inch in the bottom of each bottle and i guess ill just have to wait to touch my brew it did ferment very fast so i am wondering if maybe it will be a little sooner than 3 weeks?
Did you happen to read the blog, the one with the word patience in the title? It all depends on the gravity of the beer. you have to remember, you're not making koolaid, you are making a living thing. And you are not in charge, the yeast are and they have their own agenda and time frame.

Personally I don't touch my first beer til 3 weeks, I know from experience that the beer won't be ready anytime before that, so it's a waste of a beer.

I know it's hard in the beginning, but the outcome is so worth it.

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Old 11-17-2009, 08:47 PM   #10
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You can drop a lot of your yeast out of suspension by chilling for 2-3 days at around 33* before bottling. This will help reduce the amount of sediment but will still leave enough yeast to carbonate. Also, letting it rest in a bright tank or fermenter for another week or two will help. Finally, I assume that you didn't get much if any sediment when you racked off of the secondary into the bottling bucket. Stirring up the trub in your fermenter and getting that into the bottling bucket is a common way to also get excessive sediment in bottle.

 
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