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Old 10-29-2009, 10:28 PM   #1
BoZzyFresh
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Jun 2009
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I know this is a shot in the dark but as most who talk to me know im a huge Dogfish Head fan. Anyone out there have a cclone for Old School Barleywine?
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Old 10-30-2009, 01:29 PM   #2
Oldsock
 
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I can't find a clone, but here is a start from their website.

"Bold, yet smooth! Fermented with dates and figs, this bone-crusher has a completely unique flavor.

ABV: 15.0
IBU: 85"

Dogfish head uses a lot of sugar in their big beers, normally fed to the beer over the course of fermentation. I would start with a nice strong brown ale around 1.110, then feed it the sugar and dried fruit to hit your gravity. Here is a similar base beer I did based of Lost Abbey's Angel's Share: http://madfermentationist.blogspot.c...arleywine.html I didn't add much sugar or the fruit, but I did add some liquor soaked oak cubes

If your primary ale yeast struggles you can either go with White Labs Super High Gravity or some wine yeast.

Sorry I can't be more specific than that, but it might help some.
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Old 10-30-2009, 03:31 PM   #3
BoZzyFresh
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how do you account or calculate the gravity change/ABV if you add yeast/sugar after the first round of fermentation is complete? just as an example say SG is 1.062 and FG is 1.021 that gets you around 5.5%ABV...If you add sugar and the gravity comes up to 1.050 for instance after adding sugar then you pitch yeast again. how can you determine the total ABV once the second round of "primary fermentation" is complete?...the whole concept i get my head around but this is the only detail im not straight on. Anyone gots some advicimo?
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Old 10-30-2009, 04:08 PM   #4
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You are adding .029 of sugar, so your effictive OG would be 1.091 (1.062 + .029). Just use the new FG (after the second fermentation) to figure out the alcohol. if you add water along with your sugar you will be slightly overestimating your alcohol, but you will be close.
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Old 10-30-2009, 04:15 PM   #5
BoZzyFresh
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Jun 2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldsock View Post
You are adding .029 of sugar, so your effictive OG would be 1.091 (1.062 + .029).
Cool, i think ive got it...so make a small sugar/water mixture and take the gravity...add it to the beer after first fermentation completes. when calculating ABV add the sugar gravity reading to the original OG and use the FG after 2nd fermentation to calculate ABV? (if not this then how do you know the gravity of added sugar?) Phew, lemme know
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Old 10-30-2009, 05:30 PM   #6
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You can't just add the gravity of the sugar solution since the volume of each would be needed (in which case you could do a weighted average). What I was suggesting is to take the gravity of the beer/wort before and after adding the sugar to get the gravity change (then add that number to the OG).

Alternatively you could just estimate. 1 lb of cane sugar will boost the gravity of 5 gallons of beer by .009. Honestly that is close enough to just add onto your original gravity reading (before sugar) to use in ABV calculations.
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Old 10-30-2009, 10:09 PM   #7
BoZzyFresh
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dude thanks for explaining that, mucho helpfuli
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