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Old 10-03-2006, 05:01 PM   #11
dougjones31
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My experiences differ. Never had anything turn cidery.

 
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Old 10-03-2006, 05:09 PM   #12
homebrewer_99
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dougjones31
My experiences differ. Never had anything turn cidery.
Cidery flavor is mostly caused when using too much corn sugar. I don't.
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Old 10-03-2006, 05:44 PM   #13
dougjones31
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If you keg a beer with a gravity that is a little high, you have unfermented sugar in the beer which will make it sweet. As it ages this sugar gets consumed. It may overcarb the beer if it is bottled.

I never use corn sugar either.

 
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Old 10-03-2006, 05:54 PM   #14
butler1850
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Quote:
Originally Posted by homebrewer_99

If you were making an American Wheat then by all means hop away... It is YOUR brew afterall.
Ok, now this makes sense.... it's not hugely hoppy, but it's mighty tastey!

 
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Old 10-03-2006, 05:55 PM   #15
butler1850
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dougjones31
If you keg a beer with a gravity that is a little high, you have unfermented sugar in the beer which will make it sweet. As it ages this sugar gets consumed. It may overcarb the beer if it is bottled.

I never use corn sugar either.
I only used the corn sugar to bottle, 5oz in 5gal...

I doubt it'll overcarb, there was only a little bit of carbonation in the beer when sampled after 7 days in bottle. Enough for me, but more wouldn't be a bad thing.

 
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Old 10-03-2006, 10:32 PM   #16
SteveM
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Most beers will get an improved head over time. Smaller bubbles, more head possibly with "peaks," and better retention. In a few weeks I bet this happens to yours.

 
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Old 10-05-2006, 09:00 PM   #17
jar
 
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The sweetness is probably priming sugar that the yeast haven't gotten around to eating yet. Most of my beers have tasted sweet at the 1 week mark. It's usually mostly gone around 2 weeks, and completely around 3.

 
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Old 10-06-2006, 06:19 PM   #18
butler1850
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Jar,

I was just down at the LHBS getting supplies for the next batch (Ipswich Ale clone), and talked to the guy that runs the place about this exact issue. (It was a recipe of his that I used) His first question was "How was the carbonation?"

My reply of "Not bad, but I'm sure it'll get more bubbles." Triggered his response of "It's probably still some of the priming sugar. As more carbonation is formed, carbonic acid is formed, which will also help moderate some of the sweetness."

Makes sense to me.

 
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