Coldbreak Brewing HERMS Giveaway!

HomeBrewSupply AMCYL Brew Kettle Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing > Partial mash vs extract brewing
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 10-26-2009, 01:49 AM   #1
cell
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Montreal, Canada
Posts: 102
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default Partial mash vs extract brewing

Why do people switch from extract brewing to partial-mash brewing? Is partial-mash cheaper? Does it make better beer?


cell is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2009, 01:53 AM   #2
Parker36
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Lesotho
Posts: 4,777
Liked 22 Times on 20 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

Partial mash is kind of an in between step between extract and AG. Some people use it as a way to learn the AG methods, others don't have the space or equipment for AG so its the closest they can get.

You can make great beer with either method, but partial mash gives you more freedom and control over what goes into it


Parker36 is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2009, 02:00 AM   #3
SavageSteve
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
SavageSteve's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 990
Liked 9 Times on 6 Posts

Default

I'm a partial masher who started as an extract brewer. I do it for four reasons (in no particular order):

1. To learn mashing/sparging/lautering techniques on a small scale
2. To add a "fresher" malt flavor to my beer (this could be debated)
3. To use grains that must be mashed, for which there is no extract available
4. To feel a bit more connected to the brewing process instead of just dumping ingredients together.

On the whole, I like it, but it is a bit more work and lengthens the brew day compared to extract brewing.

-Steve
__________________
On Deck: Jamil's Vanilla Robust Porter
Fermenting: Orange Blossom Mead
Kegs: Element 56 Pale Ale, Ron's Belgian Blonde, Summer'n Saison, Furloughktoberfest '09, Grateful Pale Ale, Sam Adams Cream Stout Clone, EdWort's Apfelwein
Planning: n/a
SavageSteve is offline
2
People Like This 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2009, 02:06 AM   #4
peripatetic
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 181
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Partial mash is simply extract brewing with one extra step -- you steep a bag of grains at the beginning. Everything else is the same. With the wide variety of specialty grains available, adding this one very simple step (requiring zero extra equipment) can give you a lot of flexibility in terms of the flavor of your beer.

It really is a small leap. In fact, my very first kit was an "extract kit" with a bag of grains to steep. I didn't even know at the time that I was technically doing a "partial mash."
__________________
-------------------------------------------------
Donated all of my gear to my Paduan Learner before recent move to West Coast. Now I get to buy all new stuff, but I certainly don't have anything brewing right now!
peripatetic is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2009, 02:09 AM   #5
WIP
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Arlington, Texas
Posts: 793
Liked 6 Times on 6 Posts
Likes Given: 7

Default

I didn't know until now that I am a partial mash brewer. lol

The least grains I have used is 2 lbs.
__________________
Marc Moberg
Assistant Winemaker/Cellar Manager
Inwood Estates Vineyards and Winery
1350 Manufacturing St. #209
Dallas, TX 75207
WIP is offline
scolo Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2009, 02:16 AM   #6
jldc
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
jldc's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 662
Liked 6 Times on 6 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by peripatetic View Post
Partial mash is simply extract brewing with one extra step -- you steep a bag of grains at the beginning. Everything else is the same. With the wide variety of specialty grains available, adding this one very simple step (requiring zero extra equipment) can give you a lot of flexibility in terms of the flavor of your beer.

It really is a small leap. In fact, my very first kit was an "extract kit" with a bag of grains to steep. I didn't even know at the time that I was technically doing a "partial mash."
PM is more than Extract with steeped grains. It requires steeping at controlled temperatures and using grains with diastatic power (the enzymes to cleave starches into simple sugars).

Reason: spelling
jldc is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2009, 02:27 AM   #7
peripatetic
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Sacramento, CA
Posts: 181
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jldc View Post
PM is more than Extract with steeped grains. It requires steeping at controlled temperatures and using grains with diastatic power (the enzymes to cleave starches into simple sugars).
Well, yes. You have to use the right grains, and you have to steep it correctly. That goes without saying (I thought). But it is correct to say that it only adds one step to the process, and shouldn't be seen as anything to be intimidated by. That was my main point.
__________________
-------------------------------------------------
Donated all of my gear to my Paduan Learner before recent move to West Coast. Now I get to buy all new stuff, but I certainly don't have anything brewing right now!
peripatetic is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2009, 02:35 AM   #8
Parker36
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Lesotho
Posts: 4,777
Liked 22 Times on 20 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by peripatetic View Post
Well, yes. You have to use the right grains, and you have to steep it correctly. That goes without saying (I thought). But it is correct to say that it only adds one step to the process, and shouldn't be seen as anything to be intimidated by. That was my main point.
I think you are confusing steeping grains and a partial mash. They are different and although not overly difficult, PM does involve more
Parker36 is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2009, 02:36 AM   #9
WIP
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Arlington, Texas
Posts: 793
Liked 6 Times on 6 Posts
Likes Given: 7

Default

Ok, so maybe I am not doing a PM. Anyone have a good link to a partial mash writeup to clarify?
__________________
Marc Moberg
Assistant Winemaker/Cellar Manager
Inwood Estates Vineyards and Winery
1350 Manufacturing St. #209
Dallas, TX 75207
WIP is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2009, 02:40 AM   #10
jldc
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
jldc's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 662
Liked 6 Times on 6 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by peripatetic View Post
Well, yes. You have to use the right grains, and you have to steep it correctly. That goes without saying (I thought). But it is correct to say that it only adds one step to the process, and shouldn't be seen as anything to be intimidated by. That was my main point.
OK, I agree with that.


jldc is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
partial boil/partial mash+ late extract addition undallas All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 4 02-10-2009 02:08 AM
Substituting partial-mash to extract ThirstyHobbit All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 8 11-07-2008 04:48 PM
My Extract vs. Partial Mash Limited Visibility General Techniques 3 05-05-2008 11:28 AM
Extract to partial mash beerdad Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 3 10-24-2007 02:09 PM
extract vs. partial mash fritz_monroe Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 3 05-05-2007 09:14 PM


Forum Jump

Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS