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Old 10-20-2009, 03:44 PM   #1
jgln
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This should be something to see.


BLOGGER UPDATE: 9:20 a.m.: Ares I-X Secured At Pad. NASA is gearing up for a six-day series of tests and check outs of the Ares I-X rocket as the agency marches toward a planned launch next Tuesday. NASA engineers secured the vehicle to launch pad 39B around 9:18 a.m., capping a 4.2-mile move from the Kennedy Space Center Vehicle Assembly Building. NASA mission managers say the slender "single stick," which was secured to its mobile launcher platform by just four large bolts, remained steady throughout the eight-hour, 40-minute move. Engineers monitoring strain gauges said the forces encountered by the rocket were only 10 percent of certification limits despite sometimes breezy conditions. The rollout keeps NASA on tract for a launch during a window that will extend from 8 a.m. to noon next Tuesday. Target liftoff time for the test flight is 8 a.m.

You can keep updated here and I am sure they will have links to the launch on Tuesday if you have no other media to view it from. NASA TV is the best bet for coverage though.

http://www.floridatoday.com/apps/pbcs.dll/frontpage

 
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Old 10-20-2009, 03:51 PM   #2
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It's just a stock 4-segment Shuttle booster, a dummy 2nd stage and an instrument package. It tests none of the actual Ares I components.
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Old 10-20-2009, 04:51 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by david_42 View Post
It's just a stock 4-segment Shuttle booster, a dummy 2nd stage and an instrument package. It tests none of the actual Ares I components.
I know that but you are saying this is not worth watching?

It is almost 2x the size of the shuttle and nothing that tall has been launched since the Saturn V days. It is a new design for a rocket and a first launch. I think it is worth watching and of interest and I am pretty excited about it. If my facts are correct it is 327 feet tall, only slightly less than the 363 Saturn V.

NASA is readying the world's tallest rocket for rollout at Kennedy Space Center and officials are confident the Ares I-X will fly no matter what course the Obama Administration charts for the agency.

Standing 327 feet tall in NASA's 52-story Vehicle Assembly Building, the super-sized rocket is about 15 stories taller than a NASA space shuttle. It is scheduled to roll out to launch pad 39B on Oct. 26 and then launch five days later.

 
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Old 10-20-2009, 05:38 PM   #4
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It's one SRM with a very big empty tube stuck on. A little like a pint of Bud that's 80% foam.
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Old 10-20-2009, 06:30 PM   #5
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I guess we disagree then, no problem. I find the whole development and testing process interesting, there is a lot riding on this test and it is going to launch, not just sit there looking pretty. I worked for GE Aerospace, later Lockheed Martin for many years building satellites and even working launch operations working on top of the rocket getting it ready for launch and I know the amount of work that is going into this test. I remember spending months sometimes years preparing for a test. This is not just to see if a SRB is going to burn.

 
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Old 10-20-2009, 07:32 PM   #6
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Any launch is cool. We visited KSC a couple of years ago and that Main Assembly Building is GIANT!
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Old 10-20-2009, 07:48 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by david_42 View Post
It's just a stock 4-segment Shuttle booster, a dummy 2nd stage and an instrument package. It tests none of the actual Ares I components.
Well, the "real" Ares booster will also be an SRM, just with 5 segments. The important part of this flight will be to see if they've shaken the vibration issues that plagued the Ares design under simulation.

 
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Old 10-20-2009, 08:26 PM   #8
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right - its mainly to ensure the rocket settles into consistent flight behavior.
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Old 10-20-2009, 10:28 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jgln View Post
I guess we disagree then, no problem. I find the whole development and testing process interesting, there is a lot riding on this test and it is going to launch, not just sit there looking pretty. I worked for GE Aerospace, later Lockheed Martin for many years building satellites and even working launch operations working on top of the rocket getting it ready for launch and I know the amount of work that is going into this test. I remember spending months sometimes years preparing for a test. This is not just to see if a SRB is going to burn.
This one should be interesting, but if you want a high-stakes launch, go with the upcoming SpaceX launch where they decided to double-down and launch their untested capsule on top of their (still laregly unsuccessful/in testing) rocket. That one is the high-risk launch!

This one is comparatively a bottle-rocket compared to a real Ares launch, but it will be impressive nonetheless if everything goes well!

I do airborne telemetry support....now if NASA would just pay me to be a redundant TM asset or something for this launch

 
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Old 10-20-2009, 10:31 PM   #10
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The important part of this flight will be to see if they've shaken the vibration issues that plagued the Ares design under simulation.
No, this simulation problem is in the non-existent second stage. All four of the show-stoppers are absent from this test. The main purpose of the shoot is to test the ground support.

Quote:
will provide NASA an early opportunity to test and prove hardware, models, facilities and ground operations associated with the Ares I launch vehicle.
...
critical data during ascent of the vehicle's integrated stack, which includes the Ares I with a simulated upper stage, Orion and launch abort system.
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