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Old 10-10-2009, 01:23 AM   #1
hammer one
 
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I'm getting ready to hook up my stout faucet and I'm collecting parts so everything is ready to go. The plan is to carbonate my stout keg using beer gas. I've been doing alot of reading and it seems the best way to do it is to hook up a stainless steel air stone inside my keg. So the question is what micron stone would work best? A 2 micron or a 5 micron. I know co2 will pass through both but I'm not sure about nitrogen.

 
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Old 10-10-2009, 01:27 PM   #2
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You're better off carbonating with straight CO2, then dispensing with beer gas.

Either stone will pass both gases. The molecules are around 300-400 picometers, which is about a million times smaller than the pores in the stones.
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Old 10-10-2009, 05:29 PM   #3
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The smaller the pores in the stones the smaller the bulbbles will be and the easier it will dissolve into the beer.
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Old 10-10-2009, 06:32 PM   #4
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Why would I be better off carbing with co2? I've read tha nitrogen dose not dissolve well in beer, hence the air stone

 
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Old 10-10-2009, 06:42 PM   #5
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You aren't trying to get nitrogen to dissolve into the beer. Read this thread:

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f35/what...inness-133649/
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Old 10-10-2009, 07:10 PM   #6
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I've got most of the setup...I've been dispensing Guinness (not homebrewed)...with the setup. My next homebrew stout...I'm going to "nitrogenate" with beer mix.

Here's what I'm planning...

I'll put a stone on the short dip tube...as close as I can get it.

I'll fill the tank with beer...about 7/8ths the way...staying clear of the stone.

Pressurize the tank...bleed the tank a couple of time...just to clear off the head space of any oxygen. Pressurize just enough to ensure a seal.

Chill the tank

Flip the tank inverted...and slowly bring the gas pressure up to 30 psi...when the gas stops flowing...flip it upright again.

Wait 2 hrs

Vent...but leave enough pressure to remain sealed.

Flip inverted...slowly bring pressure up to 30 psi...when gas flow stops...right the tank again.

Wait 2 hrs.

Dispense through stout faucet...

Repeat the bubbling nitrogen-carbon dioxide blend through the stone...and waiting 2 hrs...as necessary to get the smooth, creamy, head...the low carbonated flavor, and cascading effect that I'm looking for. Then just leave it attached at 30 psi.

You'll find that the Stout Faucet holds a bit a liquid above the restictor plate...which drips out over time. Perfect breeding ground for mold to form. So after each use...you'll have to unscrew the spout...and rinse with clear water...let dry a bit...and replace, to prevent a mold plug from forming around the flow straightener.

If you aren't pouring Black & Tans...go with whatever. But I think the nitrogenation hassle you go through with the stone will pay dividends when you pour a black and tan. I don't have a mass spec to test the liquid...but I would imagine some, however miniscule amt. of N2 goes into solution...would certainly help keeping the density different than the lager or ale that you're pouring over.


 
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Old 10-10-2009, 07:54 PM   #7
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Once again, YOU ARE NOT NITROGENATING THE BEER! Even with beer gas, it's the CO2 that's going into solution. Using a stone, inverting the tank, or any other "trick" just helps to speed the process of force carbonation. Nitrogen isn't even at play for a black and tan (it's simply a matter of putting the beverage with the lowest FG on top). To illustrate that point, here's a "snakebite" I just poured with apfelwein over Guinness.

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Old 10-10-2009, 08:01 PM   #8
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To get back to the original point, you are better off simply force carbonating to a low level with pure CO2 because it's faster, cheaper, and more efficient. Once you have achieved the desired level of carbonation, use beer gas to serve.
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Old 10-10-2009, 10:44 PM   #9
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Thanks for the info Yuri I'll give it a shot your way. One more Q. When I reach the carbonation level that I want do I purge the co2 in the head space and replace it with beer gas?

 
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Old 10-11-2009, 01:03 PM   #10
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Remember, the primary reason for the nitrogen in beer gas is so that you can push the beer at a much higher pressure through the restrictor disc in the faucet without overcarbing the beer. The nitrogen, as has been mentioned, doesn't dissolve in the beer.

Carbing with the beer gas can be hard because most of the gas that you pump into the keg doesn't go into solution at all, but rather fills the head space preventing any more gas from entering the keg. Sure, you can keep venting the head space, but that just wastes your beer gas, which is generally more expensive than straight co2.
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