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Old 09-23-2009, 05:59 PM   #1
Picobrew
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Check it out:

http://www.slate.com/id/2229095/

Quote:
A recent carbon footprint analysis of Fat Tire Amber Ale highlights a few other areas that deserve attention. Producing and assembling the ingredients—malt, hops, water, and fizzy CO2 bubbles—created 678 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent, or about 21 percent of the total footprint for a bottled six-pack. A significant chunk of that—244 grams—comes from the production of synthetic fertilizers for the barley and related soil emissions, so the authors suggest that switching to organic barley could make a considerable impact. (Keep in mind, though, that making a special car trip to purchase hard-to-find, earth-friendly brews might negate any upstream CO2 savings.) In Denmark, one company now brews with unmalted barley, which they claim reduces its beer's emissions by 8 percent.

Refrigeration, both in the store and at home, represented another third of Fat Tire's footprint. All things being equal, then, beers that don't need to be refrigerated—like strong beers and standard ales—should have a lower footprint than lighter beers that are best kept cold.

 
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Old 09-23-2009, 08:55 PM   #2
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I'd be much happier to give up my car than my beer.

But with respect to being more mindful, there are a lot of breweries out there looking to be more efficient.

I just got back from the Anderson Valley brewery in Boontville CA. and did the brewery tour, They have quite an establishment there, 60% of there energy comes from solar, and they recycle 100% of there waste water. As well they are starting to move to Cans, which I feel is a far superior way to distribute beer, but is much more energy efficient.

I read this too, Fuel from Old beer and wine

It sounds like Karl Strauss down here I looking to supply these micro fuelers down here.

 
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Old 09-23-2009, 09:04 PM   #3
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I'm looking into making seltzer with my out-gassed CO2 from fermentation to shrink my footprint. I like that some breweries are gassing their excess into algae filled tubes for scrubbing as well. Algae can be an excellent scrubber! I don't ever want the environmentalists to start shouting at the breweries. We have a hard enough time as is with alcohol laws and such that extra negative attention wouldn't be a good thing. I bet we are on the list though.
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Old 09-23-2009, 09:13 PM   #4
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A 37 page report describing the carbon footprint of fire tire?!?! How much carbon footprint does it take to create a 37 page carbon footprint analysis?
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Old 09-24-2009, 05:48 AM   #5
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Hopworks here in Portland has gone whole hog green -
http://www.hopworksbeer.com/going_green.php

I really like the first two items on the list:
1. Biodiesel fired brew kettle using HUB fryer oil
2. Waste pizza oven heat captured to heat brewing water

And the beer is pretty tasty too

 
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Old 09-24-2009, 05:53 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gxm View Post
Hopworks here in Portland has gone whole hog green -
http://www.hopworksbeer.com/going_green.php

I really like the first two items on the list:
1. Biodiesel fired brew kettle using HUB fryer oil
2. Waste pizza oven heat captured to heat brewing water

And the beer is pretty tasty too

werd.

Last time I was in Portland I visited a bunch of breweries. I went to Hopworks twice. And I bought one of their mugs.
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Old 09-25-2009, 04:08 AM   #7
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If you're using carbon footprint to determine whether to drink beer or wine, you're probably better off drinking some water from the tap because what you drink isn't very important to you to begin with.

 
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Old 09-25-2009, 11:35 AM   #8
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Drink Sierra Nevada. They actually end up selling back to the grid.

 
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Old 09-25-2009, 11:51 AM   #9
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Doesn't New Belgium have it's own waste treatment plant on site?

I'm not so convinced that organic barley is that much greener. It takes a lot more diesel to plow the fields than to spray them with nitrogen and there is a lot of carbon released when turning over the soil. I haven't seen any stats either way but I'm not willing to blindly believe that the organic barley is inherently greener.

 
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Old 09-25-2009, 12:51 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tonedef131 View Post
Doesn't New Belgium have it's own waste treatment plant on site?

I'm not so convinced that organic barley is that much greener. It takes a lot more diesel to plow the fields than to spray them with nitrogen and there is a lot of carbon released when turning over the soil. I haven't seen any stats either way but I'm not willing to blindly believe that the organic barley is inherently greener.
Yeah, I've heard some of the same things about organic farming, plus you get less yield per acre so you are using up more land to grow organic barley, and moving your equipment through more fields for the same amount.
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