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Old 09-23-2009, 04:04 PM   #1
bmickey
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Aug 2009
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Over the weekend I had my house at 70 degrees and at first my wort was cooled to 70 degrees using my CF chiller. I noticed once the fermentation got going though the temp increased to about 74-75 degrees and then a few days later now has decreased back down to 70-71 after the fermentation slowed.

My question is, how critical is it to keep that temp around 68-70. THis was a Wyeast 1084 Activator pack on a Milk Stout Recipe but I'm more wondering in general, is it ok to let that temperature naturally rise with the fermentation or do some people try to even counter the natural increase in temp from the fermentation activity!?

 
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Old 09-23-2009, 04:09 PM   #2
ChshreCat
 
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You really want to try to keep the fermentation temp low the first few days during the most active fermentation to avoid off flavors, unless you're brewing a beer that needs those flavors to be in style. Some folks like to let the temp slowly rise after the first day or two to make sure the ferment finishes out, but having high at the start and falling at the end could lead to trouble.
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Old 09-23-2009, 05:08 PM   #3
Schnitzengiggle
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bmickey View Post
Over the weekend I had my house at 70 degrees and at first my wort was cooled to 70 degrees using my CF chiller. I noticed once the fermentation got going though the temp increased to about 74-75 degrees and then a few days later now has decreased back down to 70-71 after the fermentation slowed.

My question is, how critical is it to keep that temp around 68-70. THis was a Wyeast 1084 Activator pack on a Milk Stout Recipe but I'm more wondering in general, is it ok to let that temperature naturally rise with the fermentation or do some people try to even counter the natural increase in temp from the fermentation activity!?
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChshreCat View Post
You really want to try to keep the fermentation temp low the first few days during the most active fermentation to avoid off flavors, unless you're brewing a beer that needs those flavors to be in style. Some folks like to let the temp slowly rise after the first day or two to make sure the ferment finishes out, but having high at the start and falling at the end could lead to trouble.
As ChshreCat states it is best to keep temps in the recommended range for the first few days, however, for your milk stout there more than likely won't be a real noticeable impact on the flavor. Stouts in general are great beers especially for beginners due to the higher amounts of dark and roasted grains these roasty coffee-like flavors are great at covering up off-flavors. Having said that, it is crucial to keep fermentation temperatures under control to meet most style guidelines.
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Old 09-24-2009, 12:11 AM   #4
bmickey
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Aug 2009
NE Ohio
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Ok, I understand that and totally agree, but my house temps were a constant 70 degrees the entire time, never dipped. It was the natural fermentation that raised the temperature of the beer fermenting. My question is, do you guys do anything to counteract that!?

Thanks again for the responses!
Cheers.
Bill

 
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Old 09-24-2009, 12:36 AM   #5
StoutFan
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Set the fermenter in a bucket of water, and drape an old T-shirt of something similar over the fermenter and let it wick up the water from the bucket. Evaporation will cool it a little bit, plus you can play with ice/heat additions to the water in the larger bucket to keep the temp in the fermenter right where you need it.
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