Electric heatstick question - Home Brew Forums
Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > DIY Projects > Brew Stands > Electric heatstick question
Cool Brewing Giveaway - Supporting Membership Drive & Discount

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 09-02-2009, 01:42 PM   #1
zplug123
Recipes 
 
Jul 2009
Atlanta
Posts: 34
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts



I've only got 15 amp GFCI-protected outlets in my building and the local hardware store has water heating elements that range from 1500v to 4500v. If 1500v is all that a 15 amp outlet can handle, how many heatsticks should I build if I make 5-6 gallon batches of all-grain?

I saw that the Cedarcreek website says that two 2000v heatsticks can bring water to boiling in 37 minutes, so should I expect to make three or four to attain equal if not faster results?



 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2009, 01:50 PM   #2
The Pol
Recipes 
 
Feb 2007
Posts: 11,391
Liked 94 Times on 79 Posts


You would need at LEAST 2, preferrably 3... 1500W elements

Also, remember that you will need them all on SEPARATE CIRCUITS, not just separate outlets.

To boil 6 gallons, I need 65% out of my 5500W element, which is 3,575W of power



 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2009, 02:05 PM   #3
zplug123
Recipes 
 
Jul 2009
Atlanta
Posts: 34
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts


Oh darn...and I thought I almost had it figured out. I'm no electrical expert, so I'm not aware of how to find out which outlets are separate circuits. Does this mean I'd have to plug each one in different rooms (kitchen/living room/bathroom) to avoid tripping the circuit?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2009, 02:33 PM   #4
chuggs
Recipes 
 
Jul 2009
Jupiter, FL
Posts: 323
Liked 11 Times on 10 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by zplug123 View Post
Oh darn...and I thought I almost had it figured out. I'm no electrical expert, so I'm not aware of how to find out which outlets are separate circuits. Does this mean I'd have to plug each one in different rooms (kitchen/living room/bathroom) to avoid tripping the circuit?
If you've got a helper...plug a light into the outlet closest to your brewing area. Go to your panel...make sure you're not standing in a puddle of water, preferably wearing some rubber sole shoes...and trip each 20a (15a in some homes) breakers one at a time, reseting each one as you go until your helper screams STOP when the light goes out. Leave that one breaker open temporariily...Now take the lamp and plug it into other outlets near your brewing area until you find one that works... If it works...it's on a separate ciruit.

Now go reset the breaker you left open before everything in your freezer melts...


 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2009, 03:00 PM   #5
zplug123
Recipes 
 
Jul 2009
Atlanta
Posts: 34
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts


Actually the brewing area goes on outside in the barbecue area. We have an outdoor island with four outlets, each outlet has four slots. So I'll try your breaker idea

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2009, 03:07 PM   #6
The Pol
Recipes 
 
Feb 2007
Posts: 11,391
Liked 94 Times on 79 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by zplug123 View Post
Actually the brewing area goes on outside in the barbecue area. We have an outdoor island with four outlets, each outlet has four slots. So I'll try your breaker idea
More than likely that island is all on one circuit...

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2009, 03:15 PM   #7
AnOldUR
fer-men-TAY-shuhn
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
 
AnOldUR's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Mar 2007
, New Jersey
Posts: 6,869
Liked 842 Times on 607 Posts


If you go with an extension cord to one of your house outlets, make sure it's a minimum of 14 gauge, preferably 12 if it's a long run.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2009, 03:49 PM   #8
HarkinBanks
Recipes 
 
Jun 2009
Wayne, PA
Posts: 678
Liked 7 Times on 7 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by AnOldUR View Post
If you go with an extension cord to one of your house outlets, make sure it's a minimum of 14 gauge, preferably 12 if it's a long run.
Very good advice, use 14 gauge for all wiring of heatsticks and power cords. I used 16 gauge in testing and found it got hot.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2009, 04:18 PM   #9
Ohio-Ed
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
 
Ohio-Ed's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Nov 2008
Posts: 2,064
Liked 20 Times on 19 Posts


Also, if you run an extension cord from inside the house, make sure it is plugged into a GFCI protected outlet OR use an inline GFCI. You know... that whole water and electric thing.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2009, 04:33 PM   #10
HarkinBanks
Recipes 
 
Jun 2009
Wayne, PA
Posts: 678
Liked 7 Times on 7 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohio-Ed View Post
Also, if you run an extension cord from inside the house, make sure it is plugged into a GFCI protected outlet OR use an inline GFCI. You know... that whole water and electric thing.
More great advice, use GFCIs anywhere you can with this setup. I use them in my control box for the PID and then plug that power cord into a GFCI outlet.



 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Parts for electric heatstick nebben Brew Stands 7 06-09-2009 01:41 AM
Another Electric HLT Question... Beer_Maker Kettles, Mash Tuns & Hot Liquor Tanks 4 03-22-2009 05:59 PM
another electric HLT question kcinpdx Equipment/Sanitation 3 01-29-2009 09:07 PM
Electric Heatstick and a Grain Bag? Cpt_Kirks Kettles, Mash Tuns & Hot Liquor Tanks 7 12-18-2008 07:15 PM
Please keep me from electrocuting myself(heatstick question). benko Brew Stands 16 12-10-2008 08:14 PM


Forum Jump