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Old 08-24-2009, 06:26 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by oldschool View Post
i didn't sanitize anything..not only are they dried, but the 6.0%+/- alc took care of any contamination.
Can't be too sure here. The souring bacteria of a beer such as a Berliner Weisse is generally introduced post fermentation, and the source of the bacteria is sometimes raw grain because it is such a nutrient rich environment for the little buggers.

As far as flavor changes from 5 little flakes of oats, meh, but yea or nay I do like the addition of oats to certain styles, stouts in particular.
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Old 08-24-2009, 06:36 AM   #12
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I don't have scientific data backing up me saying that the oats did anything, only my taster and my friends..and yes they were side by side on the way to town last saturday evening. we were both really amazed at the difference...it was extremely noticable! try it..what can it hurt? ruining one beer?

 
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Old 08-24-2009, 06:39 AM   #13
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even if the oat thing isn't safe...the beer was very not spoiled and tasted great. i will probably try it agin to see if i have the same results.

 
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Old 08-24-2009, 05:04 PM   #14

You are probably going to end up with bottle bombs doing this. Lactobacillus will be all over a raw unsanitized grain of oat, and probably other stuff too. Over time they will ferment out additional sugars leftover and make the bottles explode, its a bit of a mess to clean up and after a while it is going to dramatically alter (towards being a very sour beer) the flavor of the beer. I would stop this practice completely without hesitation.

If you like the flavor the oat is giving you, you should experiment with putting oat in your recipes, they can give certain beer styles a particularly interesting twist ie porter/stout/etc.

 
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Old 08-24-2009, 10:06 PM   #15
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+1 sag. You might have perceived a slight increase in carbonation due to a little lacto activity.
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Old 08-24-2009, 10:30 PM   #16
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I agree that it is poor practice, but i do not agree that the taste is due to the placebo effect. It obviously took away the dry after taste of the beer. Is dryness due to the type of yeast? or otherwise
Chalk it up to the placebo effect or pure coincidence but the only thing you are adding to your beer by dumping in 5 oat flakes in the bottle is potential trouble. Fully agree with Yuri here in that it is certainly poor practice. First, all grains harbor lots of bacteria. They aren't harmful but they can inoculate an infection causing at best off flavors and at worst bottle bombs. Second, oats or any other unmalted grain is basically a collection of starches, proteins, lipids and assorted other minor ingredients. You don't want the proteins and lipids in your beer and unless the starches are converted to fermentable sugars they are only going to sit there and do nothing with the possilbe exception of clouding your beer. Third, there isn't enough on anything in the mass of five oat flakes to do much good assuming any of the potential bad things do happen.

If the process pleases you and you like the beer then go ahead an continue the practice but if you are looking for validation or any logical reason to do it I have none.

 
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Old 08-25-2009, 02:31 AM   #17
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Well I think i'll take the advise you all have given me and not do it again. But i may try mashing oats in my next porter. thanks for the input.

happy brewing!

 
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Old 08-25-2009, 02:36 AM   #18
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But i may try mashing oats in my next porter. thanks for the input.

happy brewing!
Now that's a good idea.

 
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Old 08-25-2009, 03:18 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by saq View Post
You are probably going to end up with bottle bombs doing this. Lactobacillus will be all over a raw unsanitized grain of oat, and probably other stuff too. Over time they will ferment out additional sugars leftover and make the bottles explode, its a bit of a mess to clean up and after a while it is going to dramatically alter (towards being a very sour beer) the flavor of the beer. I would stop this practice completely without hesitation.

If you like the flavor the oat is giving you, you should experiment with putting oat in your recipes, they can give certain beer styles a particularly interesting twist ie porter/stout/etc.
Not that I'm in favor of adding anything at bottling, but the lacto scare "shouldn't" be something I'd worry about. Naturally occuring strains of Lactobacillus has an alcohol tolerance somewhere around 3% (Wyeast has a blend that goes to 8%, but it's engineered that way). So as long as your brew is stronger than that, you shouldn't have a problem with lacto bottle bombs.
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Old 08-25-2009, 03:35 AM   #20
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cimirie, how is your fat tire clone? I have that in my primary right now. what what your OG? mine was 1.056. maybe a "little" on the high side but it'll do.

 
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