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Old 08-17-2009, 09:19 PM   #1
coffeegod
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Mar 2009
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Hey folks,

I have been brewing for a little over a year and a half. I have read Palmer's How to brew, Homebrewing for dummies, Home brewing by Dave Miller, Brewing Classic Styles, all three of Charlie Papazans [sp] books, as well as homebrewing gadgets... my question is this what is next? Any classic reads out there to further my education? What is your favorite brewing book?

 
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Old 08-17-2009, 09:24 PM   #2
carnevoodoo
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May 2007
San Diego, CA
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Designing Great Beers is a must have in my opinion.

I just got Tasting Beer by Randy Mosher, who also wrote Radical Brewing. Both are great books.

The series of three books... Farmhouse Ales, Brew Like a Monk, and Wild Brews. Awesome if you like Belgian style beer.

For food pairing, Garrett Oliver's Brewmaster's Table is a nice read.
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Old 08-17-2009, 09:27 PM   #3
moti_mo
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Oct 2008
Denver, CO
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+1 on Brew Like a Monk and Radical Brewing. I also just got Principles of Brewing Science, but haven't started reading it yet (just got it yesterday).

 
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Old 08-17-2009, 09:31 PM   #4
carnevoodoo
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May 2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moti_mo View Post
+1 on Brew Like a Monk and Radical Brewing. I also just got Principles of Brewing Science, but haven't started reading it yet (just got it yesterday).
The second ed. of the Principles of Brewing Science seems like an interesting read, but you need to have a fairly sturdy understanding of bio and math to really get all you can out of it. And really, it will increase your understanding of the chemical processes that take place, but it won't likely help you make a better beer.

That said, it is one of the only modern homebrew books I don't own and it is on my list.
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Old 08-17-2009, 09:33 PM   #5
weirdboy
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May 2009
Los Angeles
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++ Designing Great Beers. That should be the next book you read.
++ on Brew Like a Monk and Farmhouse Ales if you like those styles, or at least if you want to brew them

 
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Old 08-18-2009, 02:54 AM   #6
moti_mo
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Oct 2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carnevoodoo View Post
The second ed. of the Principles of Brewing Science seems like an interesting read, but you need to have a fairly sturdy understanding of bio and math to really get all you can out of it. And really, it will increase your understanding of the chemical processes that take place, but it won't likely help you make a better beer.
Yeah, that was the impression I got just leafing through it in a store. But I'm a chemistry geek, and I've read several of the other classics, so I'm just trying to wrap my head around more of what's going on at the molecular level. May not help me make better beer, but should be a fun read anyway.

 
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Old 08-18-2009, 04:37 PM   #7
skadalajara
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The Encyclopedia of Beer.
My copy's more than 10 years old. I hope it's being updated regularly.
It has some useful historical info. Profiles of the breweries that were around when it came out, descriptions and histories of the different styles, etc.
It's not something you'll read cover to cover (unless you're like me) but if you want to know where the term "vorlauf" comes from, or how a 16th century alewife let people know her latest batch was ready to drink, that's where you'd find out.
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Old 08-18-2009, 04:41 PM   #8

My favorite brewing-related books are Radical Brewing and Farmhouse Ales, fwiw.

 
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Old 08-18-2009, 04:45 PM   #9
mysterio
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Dec 2005
Glasgow, Scotland
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Beer - Tap into the Art & Science of Brewing by Charlie Bamforth is a fantastic read, i'm surprised no-one really talks about this one.
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Old 08-18-2009, 04:47 PM   #10
Edcculus
 
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Wild Brews opened my eyes to an entire new world of beer.

 
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