Making a Starter for Barleywine - Home Brew Forums
Register Now For Free!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Fermentation & Yeast > Making a Starter for Barleywine

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 08-10-2009, 04:32 PM   #1
Noleafclover
 
Noleafclover's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Jul 2009
Nebraska
Posts: 178


Heya folks!

I'm making my first barleywine.
For a recipe, I'm using one I found here created by Brewpastor - at this link: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f74/ag-w...leywine-26724/

I've read in several places that for a high gravity beer like this, a big starter is required. Not only that, but I've also been reading that to make your best beer you should always use a starter.

I've never created a starter. I listended to a podcast by the Brew Strong folks about making a start and believe I can make one for a normal 1.040 beer. I also thought this pictoral was helpful: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f39/how-...ctorial-76101/.

However, I'm unclear what the difference between a starter for a 1.040 beer and a 1.106 Barleywine would be. Do I double the amount of DME used, then pitch the vial of WLP001 in? I've read that the starter for a beer this big needs to end up being a gallon in size...

Sorry for the probably very basic questions... Just trying to mature my brewing processes a little!

- Noleaf

 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-2009, 05:24 PM   #2
scinerd3000
 
scinerd3000's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Mar 2008
Milton, De
Posts: 2,127
Liked 11 Times on 11 Posts


you have a few options. The purpose of a starter is to build up the cell count of the yeast to a desirable level so they start fermentation in a timely manner as well as to make for healthier cell walls which facilitates healthier yeast. This tends to make infections harder to take hold.

When i do large beers i will usually make a small starter of 500 ml @1.040 SG and wait for it to ferment and then pitch into another larger starter of the same SG. Ive stepped up the gravity on starters also but i find that it is just a waste of DME. Some people pitch the vial into only one larger starter and i know of some who do the gallon starter in the bottom of a carboy they will be using for the beer. When fermentation done on their starter, they decant off the liquid and syphon there cooled beer onto the top of the yeast cake. This has the added advantage of not having to worry about sanitizing multiple containers.
__________________
On Hiatus: Brewing at work....

 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-2009, 05:24 PM   #3
Edcculus
 
Edcculus's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Jun 2007
Greenville, SC
Posts: 4,546
Liked 48 Times on 45 Posts


For beers that big, I'd suggest brewing up a 4-5% lightly hopped beer. Milds or even APA's in the low hop range would work. I did that for the Russian Imperial Stout I recently brewed. I pitched straight onto the yeast cake. Its usually better to pitch some of the slurry according to Mr Malty Pitching Rate Calculator.

If you don't want to do that, the calculator says you need about a 3.35L starter. Thats just shy of a gallon. Use the same ratio Jamil describes in this article.

Quote:
Use a 10 to 1 ratio. Add 1 gram of DME for every 10 ml of final volume. (If you're making a 2 liter starter, add water to 200 grams of DME until you have 2 liters total.)
This is by weight of course.

You don't want to double the DME. A starter should always be in the 1.040 range. Remember, you are trying to make yeast, not acclimate them to a high gravity environment.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-2009, 06:01 PM   #4
NotALamer
Recipes 
 
Jun 2009
OH
Posts: 143
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts


Here's the section about starters on Palmer's online How To Brew site. Unfortunately I don't see the charts about cell counts that the book has, but it's still good info.

The pitching rate calculator will tell you how many cells you should pitch for a particular OG, but not how to get that many cells. It says you want 355 billion for a 5 gallon batch of 1.106 OG. A Wyeast Activator or tube of White Labs should have about 100 billion cells. The chart in HTB says that pitching this to a 4 qt starter should give you around 305 billion. Slightly short of where you want to be, but pretty close.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-10-2009, 06:09 PM   #5
Noleafclover
 
Noleafclover's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Jul 2009
Nebraska
Posts: 178

Thanks guys, much appreciated.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2009, 12:27 AM   #6
uechikid
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
 
uechikid's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Aug 2009
Antioch Ca.
Posts: 626
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts


I would also oxygenate before pitching your yeast. With high gravity beer (if not oxygenated) the yeast can stall out from the lack of Oxygen. It just happened to me a couple of months ago.
__________________
"Carpe Diem"

 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2009, 12:31 AM   #7
Beerrific
 
Beerrific's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Mar 2007
Georgia
Posts: 5,562
Liked 55 Times on 47 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by NotALamer View Post
The pitching rate calculator will tell you how many cells you should pitch for a particular OG, but not how to get that many cells.
This one? Yeah it does, it tells you how many packs you need or you can move the slider and go to less packs and X liters of starter.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2009, 12:49 AM   #8
shek
Recipes 
 
Apr 2009
Long Beach, CA
Posts: 257
Liked 4 Times on 2 Posts


Does anyone have an idea how many cells would be in the yeast cake from a previous 5G batch? I'm making a lighter beer right now, but I'm just going to try to drop my next batch (either a BW or IIPA) right onto the previous cake. I would assume it should be sufficient.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2009, 02:17 AM   #9
scinerd3000
 
scinerd3000's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Mar 2008
Milton, De
Posts: 2,127
Liked 11 Times on 11 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by shek View Post
Does anyone have an idea how many cells would be in the yeast cake from a previous 5G batch? I'm making a lighter beer right now, but I'm just going to try to drop my next batch (either a BW or IIPA) right onto the previous cake. I would assume it should be sufficient.
for the most part the correct pitch is 1/4 to 1/3 of the yeast cake
__________________
On Hiatus: Brewing at work....

 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2009, 03:58 AM   #10
Killer_Robot
 
Killer_Robot's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Apr 2009
Rochester, NY
Posts: 215
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts


I just put this recipe into secondary last week. I'd washed my yeast from a previous lighter beer, so I took a jar of that and mixed a starter with a bottle of Malta Goya cut 1:1 with water. Maybe it was more than I needed, but I figured overpitching was better than underpitching. It went from 1.102 to 1.020 and tasted pretty good going to secondary for such a strong beer, so no complaints here.

 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Making and using a starter Homebrewcrazy Fermentation & Yeast 4 09-03-2009 07:26 PM
small batch barleywine. Need a starter?? ethangray19 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 11 01-04-2009 08:44 PM
Making a starter without DME nukebrewer Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 8 11-08-2008 04:23 AM
Making a starter MN_Jay Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 10 06-13-2008 07:50 PM
Making a starter illin8 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 1 04-30-2008 04:56 AM


Forum Jump