Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > What's the best temp for bottle conditioning / carbonation?
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Old 08-09-2012, 01:23 PM   #11
bobbrews
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72-78 f


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Old 08-09-2012, 02:15 PM   #12
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When my last two batches got down to 60F or so,they didn't carb hardly at all. The process slowed to a near stop. Took them all upstairs to the MB,the warmest room in the house. After another month or so,they were much better. But not quite as good as they would've been normally.
So 70F or better is best. But not too warm,like 90f+ ime.


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Old 08-11-2012, 01:33 PM   #13
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So, no off flavors from bottle conditioning in the 70s then? sorry for all the questions
I'm trying to figure out a process for consistency.
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Old 08-11-2012, 01:45 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gasturbine View Post
I also thought high temps (over 80) kills off yeast. and colder temps retards the process.
Yeast don't mind warm temperatures - Saisons are commonly fermented in the 80s or even 90s, and dry yeast is rehydrated in 90+ degree water. I am no microbiologist, but it's somewhere north of 100 degrees that their vitality and viability takes a nosedive.

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Originally Posted by pjcampbell View Post
So, no off flavors from bottle conditioning in the 70s then?
No. Although once bottle conditioning is done, it's better to store them cold (I know that contradicts what I said three years ago in an earlier post in this thread - the impacts of warm storage aren't always immediately obvious, but do become very apparent down the road, especially for hoppy beers)
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Old 08-18-2012, 01:46 AM   #15
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So, I just drank some of my friend's home brew which turned out flat even after a couple weeks of bottle conditioning. I saw this article: http://hbd.org/brewery/library/YPrimerMH.html and came to the conclusion that lower temps produce higher CO2 (look at the second and third tables) in beers.

But now I'm confused. Should I condition my bottles in the refrigerator or at room temps?
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Old 08-18-2012, 01:57 AM   #16
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You misread. Lower temps don't produce more CO2. The lower temps simply allow the C02 to be dissolved into the beer at a higher volume. You need to bottle condition in the 70-80 degree range and then put them in the fridge for 48 hours to give the CO2 time to "dissolve" into the beer for even carbonation.
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Old 08-18-2012, 01:58 AM   #17
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Read this. It should answer most of your questions. http://www.homebrewtalk.com/entries/...ditioning.html
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Old 08-18-2012, 02:01 AM   #18
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Lower temps help carbonation ABSORB INTO beer, which results in the liquid being fully saturated with carbon dioxide. However, in order for the yeast to MAKE carbon dioxide, the beer needs warmer temperatures. Therefore, proper carbonation requires a 2-step process. First, you need to bottle condition for 2 to 3 weeks at 70-90 degrees to allow the yeast to ferment the added priming sugar and generate carbon dioxide. Once this carbon dioxide has been generated by the fermentation of the priming sugar, then the bottles need to be put into the "cold conditioning" phase. Place the bottles in the fridge for 24 to 48 hours. The cold temperatures will help ensure that the carbon dioxide generated during bottle conditioning get fully absorbed into the liquid. This results in properly carbonated beer.
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Old 08-18-2012, 02:49 AM   #19
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Thanks all, indeed I discovered my mistake too (and let my friends know to take the beer I just gave them out of the fridge). So I took 40 or so beers back out of the fridge, and put them away in a box. This should also prevent me from being tempted to open a cold one before it's ready


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