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Old 08-25-2006, 07:34 PM   #1
iloman
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Default Has anyone tried this Pumpkin Porter Kit?

Has anyone tried this Pumpkin Porter kit from thehomebrewstore.com? I was thinking that for this year's pumpkin brew I'd go darker this year. My wife has really been into Breckenridge's Vanilla Porter lately and I'm hoping she'd enjoy this as well.

Anyone else think that 6 whole cloves might be a bit much?

Thanks,
Jason


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Old 08-26-2006, 08:33 PM   #2
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Default Pumpkin porter

Tried it last year. It was OK. The spices overwhelmed the pumpkin. The canned pumpkin in the boil created one hell of a mess to strain into fermenter. Found a new recipe I'm going to brew tomorrow. It calls for cutting up and baking real pumpkin for an hour then mashing pumpkins with grains at 150 - 170 for an hour, then sparging into brew pot. Only problem is it's too early for real pumpkin. Food sites reccomend acorn squash as an excellent substiution for Pumpkin so I'll let you know how my Acorn Squash Ale turns out.


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Old 08-27-2006, 01:38 AM   #3
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The recipe I used called for 6 tsp of pumpkin pie spice and 6 whole cloves. I added both every ten minutes of the 60 minute boil. I'm hoping it's not too bad, but while boiling it smelled like baking pumpkin pie!
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Old 08-30-2006, 09:22 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cheers55
Tried it last year. It was OK. The spices overwhelmed the pumpkin. The canned pumpkin in the boil created one hell of a mess to strain into fermenter. Found a new recipe I'm going to brew tomorrow. It calls for cutting up and baking real pumpkin for an hour then mashing pumpkins with grains at 150 - 170 for an hour, then sparging into brew pot. Only problem is it's too early for real pumpkin. Food sites reccomend acorn squash as an excellent substiution for Pumpkin so I'll let you know how my Acorn Squash Ale turns out.
I've read in other posts that some have baked the can stuff before putting it into the boil. I haven't made up my mind of doing that, lowering the spices to 5 tsp and 5 cloves, or adding a little more pumpkin.

The first Pumpkin Ale I made I waited to use the real stuff and the flavor was a little on the weak side. Of course that was before I'd heard of others baking it before steeping with the grains. I'll bet that carmalization helps bring out a bit more of the fruit flavor.

Thanks for your feedback!
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Old 09-04-2006, 03:54 PM   #5
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Default No acorn squash

After eating some of the (cooked) acorn squash I decided against using it. I saw that other readers suggested carmelizing the canned pumpkin in a 325 oven for an hour. I spread 3 cans thnily on a cookie sheet and after carmelizing added it at the begining of the boil. It made the wort a nice deep orange color and the pumpkin mixed thoroughly with the water. No mess putting into primary. Also, I used whole allspice, nutmeg, cloves and cinnamon to give hopefully a more subtle flavor than adding ground spices. I used 3 cinnamon additions and 2 of the other spices. To give it a little more hoppy bite I used centennial hops for bittering, halletauer for flavor and cinnamon for aroma. When I racked to secondary some of the pumpkin had settled to the bottom of the primary. I'll let you know how it came out in October.
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Old 09-08-2006, 05:43 PM   #6
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Use Sweet Potatoes. The Starch conversion is easier and the sweet potatoe will strain easier.

Sweet Potatoe Pie and Pumkin Pie taste almost identical.
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Old 09-26-2006, 04:59 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dougjones31
Use Sweet Potatoes. The Starch conversion is easier and the sweet potatoe will strain easier.

Sweet Potatoe Pie and Pumkin Pie taste almost identical.
I'm curious if anyone has tried the sweet potatoe yet?

Also, I have an altered version of the porter recipe thanks to LHBS guy. Just brewed it up Sunday night, and I'll post the new recipe and initial taste tests next week when I rack it to secondary.
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Old 09-26-2006, 05:22 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iloman
I'm curious if anyone has tried the sweet potatoe yet?

Also, I have an altered version of the porter recipe thanks to LHBS guy. Just brewed it up Sunday night, and I'll post the new recipe and initial taste tests next week when I rack it to secondary.
Pumpkins are readily available now.
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Old 09-26-2006, 05:31 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by Dude
Pumpkins are readily available now.
Of course, but what if I want Pumpkin Ale in March? I might have to try Sweet Potatoe Ale
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Old 10-14-2006, 02:45 AM   #10
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Alright, a little later than planned, but here it is. I racked this almost two weeks ago and sampled it on the way to the secondary.

The good - The pumpkin pie flavor was one of the best I've personally tasted in a pumpkin beer. It wasn't over powering, but definitly present and pleasant. Usually most pumpkin ales I've had, including Blue Moon's, Dog Fish Head's, and New Holland Brewery's have always been on the weaker side of pumpkin flavor for me. So far this is really hitting the spot

The bad - Too bitter. The bitterness is just a tad over what I'd like to see in this kind of beer. Also, it's lacking in the chocolate flavor. If the flavors don't blend and mellow over the next few weeks in the bottle I plan on brewing this again with an increase to 3/4 pounds chocolate malt, as well as reducing the Hallertau hops to 1/2 ounce.

The primary - The directions mention removing pumpkin sludge from the strainer on the way to the fermenter. Yeah! This happened a few times all right. In fact I ended up with close to 6 gallons in the primary when all was said and done. When I racked to secondary there was nearly 1 gallon of sludge left in the bottom.

OG was 1.040
FG to come when I bottle

The altered recipe (as the LHBS wrote on my recipe sheet for me):

6 pounds light DME
1 pound 40L crytal malt
1/2 pound chocolate malt
1/4 pound black
1/4 pound roasted
1/2 pound victory
44 ounces canned pure pumpkin (Libby's comes in 29 and 15 ounce cans)
1 cup brown sugar
6 tsp. pumpkin pie spice
6 whole cloves
1 ounce Hallertau pellets (bittering)
1/2 ounce Kent Golding (flavor)
1/2 ounce Cascade pellets (finishing)
1 tbsp Irish moss
1 package WYeast 1028 London Ale Yeast

Raise 2 gallons of water to 155F in your brew pot. Place the cracked grains in the muslin grain bag and place in the hot water. Steep for 45 minutes. With 15 minutes remaining, in a separate pot, boil 3 quarts of water with the pumpkin, brown sugar, cloves, and spice. When the timer runs out, remove the grains, and add the boiling pumpkin mash to the first pot. Add the liquid malt and Hallertau hops. Bring it all back to a boil and set the timer for 50 minutes. With 30 min remaining, add the Kint Golding hops. With 10 min remaining, add the Cascade hops. When the timer runs out, remove from the burner, cover, and set aside to cool.

Add 3 gallons of chilled water to a clean and sterilized fermenter. Strain the wort into the fermenter (you may need to stop periodically to remove pumpkin sludge from the strainer.) Add the yeast when the temperature falls below 80 degrees F. Primary fermentation should run approximately one week. Rack the beer into a clean and sterilized secondary fermenter and allow it to ferment out to completion. Let the sediment settle out before bottling.


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