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Old 07-06-2009, 02:46 PM   #1
Oakwood
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Feb 2007
Oakwood, Ohio
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Every batch I have done has foamed up and I have to remove it from heat to keep it from boiling over. I mean it every one. I have tried doing 3 gal boils and full 5 gallon boils, tried less heat once it starts rolling, and even tried diffent ways of adding pre boil and hops to see if it was the ph/acid levels changing causeing the foaming.

My second issue after 3 years of brewing I am finding alot of my lighter style beers (american wheat is my current I noticed it with) all have a bitter taste and it is the same bitter taste with all different styles and the hops flavor and smells never come out as strong as I would like.

I have tried using alloy pots, stainless pots and it doesn't make a difference. I have tried using bottled drinking water, bottled distilled water, tap water, I have tried filtering the water myself. Nothing getts rid of the bitterness.

The bitterness and the dual hops flavor are my issues that I want to work out this year. So far everything has had minium differance in taste. Please help.
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Old 07-06-2009, 02:57 PM   #2
cuinrearview
 
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Feb 2008
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The addition of malt extract and hops will cause the foam to form. I do full boils in a 30 qt. pot and still have to do the "on the flame off the flame" dance for a few minutes after the extract and occasionally the hops are added. It's a fact of brewing.

As for the bitterness, add less hops. Also if you are getting steeping grains too hot (above 180 degrees) that will impart some astringency.
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Old 07-06-2009, 03:01 PM   #3
Graeme
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Mar 2009
Dublin, Ireland
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I don't think you are doing anything wrong as such man. I rarely get boil overs, I usually boil around 5 gallons, I boil with the lid off while the rolling boil is going pretty solid. If you are adding all your malt extract at the beginning of the boil you have to account for the extra volume in your boil pot, once the boil kicks in after you add it, you will get that foaming, but if you are loweing the heat and keeping an eye on it I can't see what you could be doing wrong.

In terms of the bitterness you are speaking of, well bitterness is going to be down to the hops right? The more hops you add at the start of the boil will have a more bittering effect on your brew, you can calculate your IBU's on homebrewing software, and there's even a couple of free ones out there. Be conciouis of your hops AA's and quantities. Some people think extract brews have a certain 'twang' about them, this may or may not be what you are describing as bitter, I don't really buy in to the whole extract twang thing because I've made some really tasty extract beers. You will get the right balance mate.

 
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Old 07-06-2009, 03:06 PM   #4
Evan!
 
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For the boilover problem, get some Fermcap/defoamer.

For the bitterness problem, not really sure without more info. The metal of the pots makes no difference. I would say try adding a gram or two (per 5 gallons) of Calcium Chloride to the boil, see if that helps increase the maltiness of your beer. If you want more hop flavor/aroma and less bitterness, though, the first and most obvious thing to try is to front-load your hop schedule.
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Old 07-06-2009, 03:12 PM   #5
Slipgate
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On the rare occasions that I am able to get a boil strong enough to boil over, I simply blow on the foam and it settles right out. I guess you could use a hairdryer as well.

 
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Old 07-06-2009, 03:14 PM   #6
MMW
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Apr 2009
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1) Have you tried fermcap?

2) Are you adjusting hops for your boil volume?

What about chilling? If you are chilling slow (long time to below 170ish), then your hops will be over utilized. The flavor wouldn't be off, just more bitter than you are expecting. Moving your hops schedule forward 10-20 minutes would give less bittering and more flavor/aroma.

From the "Exploring No Chill Brewing" Thread:

Quote:
Originally Posted by The Pol View Post
FWIW... this is the conversion tool that I have come up with (it will continue to be tweaked I am sure) to convert regular recipe hop additions to NO CHILL applications. This is based on some of my own experience and reading on continued isomerization in the hot wort after it is transferred to the no chill cube.

Yes, isomerization takes place even when hops are removed, the oils are in the wort, not the hops at this point.

IOW, if you're chilling very slow you will continue to get bitterness from your hops and lose the flavor/aroma.

 
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Old 07-06-2009, 04:00 PM   #7
Oakwood
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Feb 2007
Oakwood, Ohio
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I have a wort chiller and normally can get it from 190 to 70 within 30 minutes or less, some times alot less. I then airate the wort and rack over to carboy. once it is in the location in which I will ferment it I will pitch the yeast. I have been using White labs yeast as of late with much success.

I try to follow the recipes as close as I can. But the Blond and wheat beers are made of things I have around. Would the age of the hops reflect more bitterness? I don't think this is the issue but I will have to just really scrub clean everything this week and remake the wheat beer and try it again and see if maybe the full boil vs. partial boil will knock down some of the bitterness.
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Old 07-06-2009, 04:08 PM   #8
weirdboy
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So far as bitterness/aroma one thing you might try, instead of adding less hops, is just split your hops into a couple of different additions. Do half of it 60 minutes and the other half 15 minutes or maybe even 5 minutes boil time. That should give you significantly less overall bitterness, and a lot more hoppy aroma/flavor.

 
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Old 07-06-2009, 04:16 PM   #9
MMW
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Apr 2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oakwood View Post
I try to follow the recipes as close as I can. But the Blond and wheat beers are made of things I have around. Would the age of the hops reflect more bitterness? I don't think this is the issue but I will have to just really scrub clean everything this week and remake the wheat beer and try it again and see if maybe the full boil vs. partial boil will knock down some of the bitterness.
What is a typical recipe? Or specifically, what was your last recipe that had the problem? Are you using some kind of software to calculate (even online like beercalculus.com), or just throwing in a handful of hops a couple of times during the brew?

And remember, if you have a recipe that calls for a partial boil you need to use less hops for a full boil.

 
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Old 07-06-2009, 04:32 PM   #10
Oakwood
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Feb 2007
Oakwood, Ohio
Posts: 83

I think that is it. I am doing full boils with the same amount of hops when it calls for 1 oz in a 3 gallon boil and I using 1 oz for a 5 gallon boil. I can't work out in my head why use less hops when you use more water? wouldn't you want more hops to more water?
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