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Old 06-29-2009, 04:10 PM   #1
threeeight
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Jun 2009
Alameda, CA
Posts: 75


Hi all,
I'm a relatively new brewer, and I'd like to make a pilsner for a friend, but I don't have a way to ferment at lager temperatures.

So, given that making a proper pilsner is not possible, I'm wondering if anyone has any recipe or other recommendations for an ale which is similar to a pilsner.

Also, if this is not really feasible, tell me...like I said, I'm pretty new to homebrewing, and as more of a stouts and porters kind of guy, my familiarity with pilsner style is somewhat limited.

Thanks!


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Old 06-29-2009, 04:13 PM   #2
Bokonon
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Mar 2007
Tri-Cities, WA
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If you use a kolsch yeast or even a really clean ale yeast (like WLP001, WY1056, or SafAle-05) and just ferment them as cool as you can you should be pretty happy



 
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Old 06-29-2009, 04:28 PM   #3
chefchris
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Jul 2008
Gainesville, Florida
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I believe Sweetwater just released this very beer. I think it's their Road Trip. Maybe see if you can dig up a little info on that.
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Old 06-29-2009, 04:35 PM   #4
Cpt_Kirks
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Sep 2008
Lakeland TN
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Here is my Pilsner ale:

10lbs Pilsner Malt
1.0lbs Flaked Wheat

US-05 yeast

Saaz (or similar) Hops

Boil for 90 minutes, the large amount of Pilsner needs it for DMS reduction. Ferment as cool as possible. I try to keep it around 62*F.

I can't keep that brew available. It just FLIES out of the keg.


 
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Old 06-29-2009, 05:37 PM   #5
Brewmando
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Dec 2007
Fort Madison, IA (SE)
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Brewers Best makes a Continental Pilsner extract kit (with grains for steeping) that is good. If you can't find one I can look up the ingredients if you wish.
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Old 06-29-2009, 06:10 PM   #6
threeeight
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Jun 2009
Alameda, CA
Posts: 75

Thanks all for the recommendations-sounds like brewing a pilsner recipe with ale yeast (like road trip ale) is my best bet for getting close to the pils style.

Kirks, one question: "DMS"? I'm missing the acronym.

I'll probably make your recipe, substituting WLP 001 (it's what the lhbs carries).

Thanks again, y'all!
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on tap: Zoey's Pilsner, Kickback Kolsch, Brown Rye Girl, Killdeer Breakfast Beer
fermenting: Apfelwein
lagering:air...
bottled: Bearskin Rug Barleywine (2010), Siberian Winter RIS (2011)

 
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Old 06-29-2009, 06:21 PM   #7
Cpt_Kirks
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Sep 2008
Lakeland TN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by threeeight View Post
Thanks all for the recommendations-sounds like brewing a pilsner recipe with ale yeast (like road trip ale) is my best bet for getting close to the pils style.

Kirks, one question: "DMS"? I'm missing the acronym.

I'll probably make your recipe, substituting WLP 001 (it's what the lhbs carries).

Thanks again, y'all!
Dimethyl Sulfide. Sometimes listed as "DMSO", I do believe. IIRC, it leads to the "cooked vegetable" bad taste.

 
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Old 06-29-2009, 06:38 PM   #8
Poindexter
 
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Oct 2007
interior Alaska
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As Cpt Kirks has ably pointy out, Pilsner malt requires a vigorous boil to get teh DMS out of the wort.

For a relatively new brewer the first step is to get your fermenter into a water bath.

A basic pale ale fermented at 60-65°F is going to knock a lot of socks.

You can get a planter type bucket for a five or six foot tall tree at KMArt or Home Depot for probably under twenty bucks. You want one with no holes in it so it will hold water, big enough around to hold your fermenter and provide a couple or four inches of water jacket all around.

Set it someplace you won't have to move it, get your primary fermenter in there, fill it with cool tap water most of the way up. Gonna want a floating thermometer, the stick-on type isn't going to be at home here.

Hang a T shirt over the fermenter and down into the water all the way around.

Keep three or four half gallon plastic jugs half full of water alternating between the freezer and the water bath, the ice chunks in the water bath will help keep it cool.

More yeast = more heat generated during fermentation = more cooling capacity required to maintain x° temperature.

The above system will work fine with a packet of dry yeast.

If you want to pitch 2 liters of healthy yeast into 5 gal of wort you will need a significantly more advanced (and more expensive) system. I have traded a few homebrewes around now, the folks fermenting ales under 70°F are making really good beer and the folks running primary ale ferments under 65°F are making amazing stuff.

Looking back at my brewlog I wish I had built a $20 fermentation chiller sooner. On a bang for buck basis it should be the first step up from the basic plastic bucket system for just about anyone.

M2c.

PS: It won't hurt your stouts and porters ;-)

 
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Old 06-29-2009, 06:39 PM   #9
threeeight
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Jun 2009
Alameda, CA
Posts: 75

Aha! Got it now, thanks!
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on tap: Zoey's Pilsner, Kickback Kolsch, Brown Rye Girl, Killdeer Breakfast Beer
fermenting: Apfelwein
lagering:air...
bottled: Bearskin Rug Barleywine (2010), Siberian Winter RIS (2011)

 
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Old 06-29-2009, 07:10 PM   #10
threeeight
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Jun 2009
Alameda, CA
Posts: 75

Poindexter,
Thanks for the info. Fortunately, I live in a relatively moderate climate, so keeping fermentation temps around 65-68 is pretty easy, as long as the weather cooperates. I've got an oatmeal stout that went into the secondary last week, and the sample from my gravity reading was right on the money.

Sounds like the most important steps are a long boil, and keeping those fermentation temps down below 65.


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on tap: Zoey's Pilsner, Kickback Kolsch, Brown Rye Girl, Killdeer Breakfast Beer
fermenting: Apfelwein
lagering:air...
bottled: Bearskin Rug Barleywine (2010), Siberian Winter RIS (2011)

 
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