Anyone sucessfully done a JK Scrumpys clone? - Page 2 - Home Brew Forums
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Old 07-05-2009, 03:40 AM   #11
Elfmaze
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Oct 2008
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The low O2 was for storage so that they can operate the orchard year round.



 
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Old 07-06-2009, 12:47 AM   #12
CvilleKevin
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Check out the second half of this page on nitrogen and cider making, from the UK cider pages:
Nitrogen - the Forgotten Element in Cider Making

It seems to confirm that limiting nitrogen levels in the apples is helpful for inducing a stuck fermentation.

This would suggest that if you want to make a cider in the style of Srumpy’s, try to get your apples from an organic producer (low nitrogen seems to be a common factor in organic apple production, not just at JKS) and don’t add any yeast nutrient.

There is a lot of other good info on this website



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Old 09-28-2009, 01:05 AM   #13
Lovestojam
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David_42,

Agree that Newton's Folly is some pretty good cider. We pick-up about 3 x 12pks a week from Trader Joes here in Raleigh. Interestinglig enough, Nnewton's Folly is the exact same cider as woodchuck, just sold under a generic brand for $2 less per 6pk. Made at the same brewery, in Kiddlebury, ad if you look at the bottle its even the same label as the Woodchuck version. Ironic

 
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Old 10-06-2009, 05:05 AM   #14
JoeSponge
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lovestojam View Post
David_42,

We pick-up about 3 x 12pks a week from Trader Joes here in Raleigh. Interestinglig enough, Nnewton's Folly is the exact same cider as woodchuck, just sold under a generic brand for $2 less per 6pk.
Trader Joe's tomorrow night...
__________________
Oh my gosh, but cider's neat.
Taste's so sweet, it can't be beat.
Good in the cold or in the heat.
Oh my gosh, but cider's neat!

 
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Old 10-13-2009, 10:12 PM   #15
Handle
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Aug 2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lovestojam View Post
David_42,

Agree that Newton's Folly is some pretty good cider. We pick-up about 3 x 12pks a week from Trader Joes here in Raleigh. Interestinglig enough, Nnewton's Folly is the exact same cider as woodchuck, just sold under a generic brand for $2 less per 6pk. Made at the same brewery, in Kiddlebury, ad if you look at the bottle its even the same label as the Woodchuck version. Ironic
Very interesting.

I'm making a trip to the Charlotte Trader Joe's this weekend for some Stockyard Oatmeal Stout and their Josephs Braus Dunkelweizen. I'll have to check and see if they have this.

 
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Old 02-02-2010, 03:23 AM   #16
Mathematics
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Nov 2008
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BUMP

This is my favorite cider, and I am hell bent on finding a clone recipe. Their website mentions cinnamon, vanilla, & maple syrup.

Any ideas?

 
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Old 02-02-2010, 03:58 PM   #17
Teromous
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CvilleKevin View Post
Check out the second half of this page on nitrogen and cider making, from the UK cider pages:
Nitrogen - the Forgotten Element in Cider Making

It seems to confirm that limiting nitrogen levels in the apples is helpful for inducing a stuck fermentation.

This would suggest that if you want to make a cider in the style of Srumpyís, try to get your apples from an organic producer (low nitrogen seems to be a common factor in organic apple production, not just at JKS) and donít add any yeast nutrient.

There is a lot of other good info on this website
That's one of the main aspects of keeving as well. It helps when producing a naturally sweet cider.

 
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Old 02-02-2010, 04:45 PM   #18
CvilleKevin
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The JKS winter cider lists cinnamon, vanilla, & maple syrup as ingredients. The regular farmhouse stuff has just apples and yeast.

The closest batch I've tasted to JKS so far was made by some friends before the holidays. They added 2 lbs of brown sugar to fresh unpasteurized juice -- Stayman and Pink Lady, and used WLP300 wheat yeast. The wheat yeasts ferment pretty slow, which gives the wild yeast a bit of a chance to take hold and add some flavor before the wheat yeast takes over - and wheat yeast is easier to manage than a wild yeast batch. It took about 3 or so weeks to drop down to 1.020, at which point they crashed it. The end result was very similar to a JKS - it had a little lighter taste than JKS, which I liked, and definitely in the same style.

The juice was from the same orchard that I go to (Showalters). They dont use nitrogen fertilizers once the trees start producing (same as JKS, although from watching the video podcast it appears JKS may not use nitrogen fertilizers at all).

I've done some natural yeast ferments that have come out fairly close tasting to JKS, at least while the sgs were fairly high. JKS is a fairly sweet cider (1.024 to 1.028) and I usually let my natural yeast ferments go to around 1.015 before crashing, so they finish up a lot lighter, but you could crash before then to get more of a JKS taste.

WLP380 would be another good wheat yeast to use, as it finishes with a strong heavy flavor and is also a lot easier to control than a natural yeast ferment

 
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Old 02-23-2010, 08:06 PM   #19
CandleWineProject
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CvilleKevin View Post
As JoeSponge pointed out on an earlier exchange (which is why I double checked this eve Ė plus a good excuse to drink another Scrumpy), an FG of 1.024 plus six percent alcohol, means that the SG of their starting juice must be at least 1.072. Thatís a lot of sugar, but certainly not impossible.
I think there is another method to explain the SG. Since they claim there is no added sugar on the bottle and the website http://organicscrumpy.com/WhatIsOrganicScrumpy.html, I think that they start with a 1.045 juice or even up to 1.060, ferment it, and then add back juice to both sweeten and carbonate it. If they went higher, they could "dilute" it back down to 6.0% which would give the strong apple flavor from the new juice.

As far as how they keep it stable? They could have used a centrifuge to remove the yeast. They do let it age for 6 months, which a long aging process sometimes kills all yeasts. Maybe they pasteurize it? Too many theories going on in my head that don't involve sulfites or sorbates.

 
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Old 02-26-2010, 07:53 AM   #20
shek
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CandleWineProject View Post
I think there is another method to explain the SG. Since they claim there is no added sugar on the bottle and the website http://organicscrumpy.com/WhatIsOrganicScrumpy.html, I think that they start with a 1.045 juice or even up to 1.060, ferment it, and then add back juice to both sweeten and carbonate it. If they went higher, they could "dilute" it back down to 6.0% which would give the strong apple flavor from the new juice.

As far as how they keep it stable? They could have used a centrifuge to remove the yeast. They do let it age for 6 months, which a long aging process sometimes kills all yeasts. Maybe they pasteurize it? Too many theories going on in my head that don't involve sulfites or sorbates.
I had a little bit of argument with a person at a local beer bar about where the ridiculous sweetness of Scrumpy's comes from. He said it was due to complex sugars, but I doubt you could get an FG this high with any kind of juice (does juice have that many complex sugars?) unless you either add extra sugar at the start, or backsweeten it somehow, and since the bottle is stamped that it's organic my guess was that they backsweeten it with more juice. Does anyone know if this is the case?



 
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