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Old 06-23-2009, 10:49 PM   #1
lmaa
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Default Is this malt usable for beer

I was approached about buying malt in bulk, 30 kg pails.
It is called Panomalt Special Diastatic or Non-Diastatic Malt Syrup.

Would this be used to brew beer, a decent beer?


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Old 06-23-2009, 11:53 PM   #2
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Would this be used to brew beer, a decent beer?
Yes, probably not. Baking malts tend to be highly fermentable.


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Old 06-24-2009, 12:51 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by david_42 View Post
Yes, probably not. Baking malts tend to be highly fermentable.
Thanks.
Guess I'll pass on it. The spec sheet claims there is also corn syrup in it. I kind of got use to the German purity laws, malt,hops and water.
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Old 06-24-2009, 04:03 PM   #4
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German purity laws
Except that leaves out Ryes, Wits, all Belgians, milk stouts, ...
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Old 06-25-2009, 11:21 AM   #5
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Except that leaves out Ryes, Wits, all Belgians, milk stouts, ...
Don't forget chocolate, peanut butter, cherries, spices, used socks.

The law also set the price of beer at 1-2 Pfennig per Maß. As usual this affordable part gets discarded.
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Old 06-25-2009, 12:42 PM   #6
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German Purity Law doesn't mention yeast, so the law is often ignored.
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Old 06-25-2009, 01:50 PM   #7
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Reinheitsgebot is outdated, over quoted and devastatingly limiting. It's like telling a great chef that all she can use is beef, mushrooms, salt and pepper, yeah you could make a great steak or burger, but what about a crab boil.

The law was lifted in May of 1987 and thus German brewers are also allowed the creativity and freedom of other brewers around the world. It must have been very freeing to be allowed to tinker with ingredients and still call it beer. It amazes me how many people still site these laws in an attempt to make their beers sound that much more appealing.

The Reinheitsgebot was not written to make beer tastier, or to protect the integrity of beer or of the father land, but rather to make beer safer to the consumer. It was also written to limit competition for wheat which was in demand for bread and other food stuff in Bavaria and Germany at the time the law was written. So when you see that hefe that is in compliance with the Reinheitsgebot, guess what it isn't. This is just one of the examples of the word "Reinheitsgebot" being used as a marketing ploy.

Reason: syntax and spelling
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Old 06-26-2009, 12:03 AM   #8
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German Purity Law doesn't mention yeast, so the law is often ignored.
The law was first put forward is 1487 but did not came out until 1516. It was not until the 1800s that Louis Pasteur discovered that microorganisms played a role in fermentation; therefore, yeast was not known to be an ingredient of beer.

It was at the time known that bakers usually brewed better beer than most people, again no one knew why.

There are many thing that happen without people knowing the real reason.
Issac Newton thought that gravity pulling the apple caused it to hit him in the head. others say that the weight of the planet bends space and the apple was pushed down onto his head.
Others say that the earth sucks.


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