5 Gallon Ordeal - Home Brew Forums

Register Now!
Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > 5 Gallon Ordeal

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 06-14-2009, 07:39 PM   #1
jeremyjudd
Recipes 
 
May 2009
Lexington, NC
Posts: 54



This seems like a really dumb question, but why can't I get a full five gallons of brew after I'm done fermenting?

I have a five gallon glass carboy that I'm using, and if I fill it to the five gallon line (to the shoulder) I get about a half gallon of blow off (normal?) during fermentation, then I lose more because all the cake settles on the bottom of the carboy and eats up another half gallon of brew.

So generally I'm only bottling between 44-48 12 oz bottles rather than the 50-52 I'm supposed to get.

So, two questions:

is a 5 gallon carboy not big enough to actually ferment 5 gallons of brew and...

is all the blowoff I'm getting on virtually every brew I make normal?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2009, 07:48 PM   #2
MCH
Recipes 
 
Jul 2008
Idabel, Oklahoma
Posts: 152
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts


I ferment in a 7 gallon bucket and get at least 52 bottles each brew. So if possible, I would recommend upgrading to a 7 gallon bucket. I do have a 5 gallon glass carboy that I use for a secondary, though.
__________________
Quote:
You see every drink of liquor you take kills a thousand brain cells. Now that doesn't much matter 'cos we got billions more. And first the sadness cells die so you smile real big. And then the quiet cells go so you just say everything real loud for no reason at all. That'ok, that's ok because the stupid cells go next, so everything you say is real smart. And finally, come the memory cells. These are tough SOBs to kill.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2009, 07:55 PM   #3
jeremyjudd
Recipes 
 
May 2009
Lexington, NC
Posts: 54


Ah, will I get less blowoff if I cool my wort to a lower temperature before bottling? I'm always below 90 but perhaps it would help if I were even cooler? Not sure if yeast reacts more vigorously in warmer temps or not...

 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2009, 08:00 PM   #4
ikelso
Recipes 
 
Jun 2009
TX
Posts: 41

You should be cooling to 80 at least, but that won't affect blowoff afaik. The blowoff you're experiencing comes from fermenting a 5 gallon batch in a 5 gallon container. If you want to stick to carboys then get a 6.5 gallon carboy for your primary. This should prevent all that blowoff, then use the 5 gallon for your secondary.

Also, remember that a good portion of that cake at the bottom is new yeast that wasn't there before. Sure there's hotbreak and hops in there too if you don't filter before fermenting, but a large majority is yeast.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2009, 08:05 PM   #5
MCH
Recipes 
 
Jul 2008
Idabel, Oklahoma
Posts: 152
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts


Quote:
Originally Posted by jeremyjudd View Post
Ah, will I get less blowoff if I cool my wort to a lower temperature before bottling? I'm always below 90 but perhaps it would help if I were even cooler? Not sure if yeast reacts more vigorously in warmer temps or not...
From what I've read, warmer temps may kill yeast. It's always a good idea to get below 80 before pitching.
__________________
Quote:
You see every drink of liquor you take kills a thousand brain cells. Now that doesn't much matter 'cos we got billions more. And first the sadness cells die so you smile real big. And then the quiet cells go so you just say everything real loud for no reason at all. That'ok, that's ok because the stupid cells go next, so everything you say is real smart. And finally, come the memory cells. These are tough SOBs to kill.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2009, 08:46 PM   #6
Nurmey
I love making Beer
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
 
Nurmey's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Jul 2007
Omaha, NE
Posts: 3,983
Liked 30 Times on 26 Posts


Pitching at temps around 68 - 70 is good. Warmer than that and you will get some furious fermentation. Just so you know, the temperature has to be above 120 to hurt your yeast. Warm fermentation temperatures will give you some flavors that are not desirable.

You really need a larger carboy or bucket to ferment 5 gallons of beer. Mine are all 6.5 gallons or more.

One more thing that might help you get some more beer is leave it in the primary longer. The longer it sits, the more compact the yeast cake is. I leave all of mine in primary for 4 - 6 weeks and the layer is so compact that I can rack down to nothing more than 1/2 cup or less of beer.
__________________
Batch 1 Brewing
The American Revolution would never have happened with gun control.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2009, 08:59 PM   #7
ShortSnoutBrewing
Kwanesum Chinook Illahee
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
 
ShortSnoutBrewing's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Oct 2007
Portland, OR
Posts: 3,213
Liked 19 Times on 17 Posts


This is why you will see a lot of recipes as 5.5 gallons. We know we are going to loose some to trub and possibly blowoff. If you account for it while you're brewing you will get closer to that "magical" 5 gallon number.

 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2009, 07:06 PM   #8
jeremyjudd
Recipes 
 
May 2009
Lexington, NC
Posts: 54


Quote:
Originally Posted by Kilted Brewer View Post
This is why you will see a lot of recipes as 5.5 gallons. We know we are going to loose some to trub and possibly blowoff. If you account for it while you're brewing you will get closer to that "magical" 5 gallon number.

I'd thought about that because I can use my bottling bucket as a fermentor and it holds about 6.5 gallons. But I was concerned that adding another half gallon of brew without altering the recipe would also alter the taste. ie - more watery...

Is this not likely?

 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-15-2009, 07:11 PM   #9
ChshreCat
 
ChshreCat's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Aug 2008
Camano Island, Washington
Posts: 11,533
Liked 540 Times on 432 Posts


You'll want a 5.5 gallon recipe to make 5.5 gallons of beer. You don't want to just add an extra half gallon of water.

I would go out and get a larger better bottle or bucket to use for your primary. No matter what you do, if you're putting 5 gallons in a 5 gallon container, you're going to get some amount of blowoff. You really need a larger primary.

Going longer in primary (3 weeks or so) will allow the yeast cake to compact down more. With some yeasts, it becomes something close to the consistency of pudding and you can siphon the beer right off it with an autosiphon. Check out some of the posts on this thread: http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f39/leav...-yeast-116795/
__________________
"Science + beer = good!"
-Adam Savage


 
Reply With Quote
Old 06-19-2009, 02:45 AM   #10
jeremyjudd
Recipes 
 
May 2009
Lexington, NC
Posts: 54


Thanks for the tips. I'll have to get a larger fermenting vessel or split the batch. I'll try S-04 yeast on my next brew and leave it alone longer....

 
Reply With Quote
Reply
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Gallon markings for 7 gallon plastic primary fermenter scone Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 13 03-15-2014 07:16 PM
How do I scale a 5 gallon recipe to a 6 gallon yield? (extract) skahorse Recipes/Ingredients 7 10-18-2009 02:36 AM
Can I use a 5 gallon glass carboy as a primary for a 2.5 gallon batch bgough All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 3 03-24-2009 05:41 PM
10 gallon and 5 gallon rubbermaid water coolers delivered for 68 bucks. RedOctober Equipment/Sanitation 6 12-12-2008 06:33 PM
5 gallon batch + 5 gallon primary fermenter = good noisy123 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 13 07-30-2008 11:45 AM


Forum Jump