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Old 06-09-2009, 04:24 PM   #1
truckmann
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Ok here is a strange old time recipe. Don't suppose anyone has actually ever tried this?

Euell Gibbons' Persimmon Beer - uses Diospyros virginiana (common, or american persimmons)

Quote:
Persimmon Beer
This recipe, was offered by Euell Gibbons in his 1962 book, "Stalking The Wild Asparagus". Euell said, "I think it is a waste of good persimmons, but I have some friends who always very willingly dispose of any I make." This recipe is used by permission.

Ingredients:

10 pounds of wheat bran
1 gallon of pulp from very ripe persimmons

Bake this mixture like pones of cornbread until it is brown and firm. Break the pones into small pieces and put through a food chopper using a coarse plate. Dump the ground mixture into a 5 gallon crock and fill the crock not quite full of boiling water.

As soon as the crock cools to the point of barely being warm, stir in 1 package of dry yeast mixed with a little of the liquid from the crock. Keep the crock covered with a cloth. It will ferment furiously for a few days but keep watching it and in about a week it will start settling down. The moment it becomes still and clear, bottle and cap it tightly. Store it in a cool, dark place an in about 3 weeks it will be ready to use.

 
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Old 06-09-2009, 04:32 PM   #2
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I don't know about that recipe?? I am planning on making a persimmon braggot this fall/winter for my holiday brew. I have a great old persimmon tree in my backyard that yields a ton of fruit. Might as well put that fruit to some use!! Cheers!!

 
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Old 06-10-2009, 03:18 AM   #3
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A friend of mine who likes to drink my beer asked me about this recipe because he has several persimmon trees at his house. He is thinking about trying it out. Looks a little scary to me, but what the hell it should be an interesting experiment.

I was thinking about trying to get some persimmons from him for a mead this fall!

 
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Old 06-10-2009, 12:07 PM   #4
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I think persimmons are what we foreigners call sharon fruit. I split a small batch of pale ale and I racked some of it onto four macerated sharon fruit / persimmons. The beer took on a lovely color, but tasted like ass - the fruit had a pungency that overwhelmed the beer entirely. So I suspect to get the best from these, it'd be advisable to brew something other than a pale ale.
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Old 12-05-2014, 04:55 PM   #5
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Reviving this old thread after I saw this article today about persimmon beer: http://news.yahoo.com/virginia-brewe...124528366.html
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Old 12-05-2014, 05:38 PM   #6
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Since the OP's have not commented on the subject in five years I assume the experiment went horribly wrong?
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Old 12-06-2014, 07:03 PM   #7
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The OP's recipe reminds me of this 1913 one:
http://www.foodreference.com/html/pers-beer-12907.html
and they both harken back to the original Sumerian recipe for beer, where a grain was baked into biscuits for making wort.

I suspect the persimmons in these recipes are used primarily for sugar content. Persimmons have a delicate flavor and are extremely sweet. I'm not sure how much of that flavor would come through after baking and fermenting.

There are two basic types of persimmons in this world: those that are firm when ripe (e.g. fuyu), and those that are very soft when ripe (e.g. hachiya). The soft variety are horribly astringent when firm. They are basically eaten after they turn into goo on the inside. The soft persimmons lend themselves to baking, puddings, and sauces where they add sweetness and moisture. They tend to be made into desserts with spices like cinnamon and nutmeg, probably becuase they are available around the holidays. Persimmons are also made into wine. I got some going right now.
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f25/pers...ml#post6548091

I've been thinking about making a wheat style beer with persimmons for flavor. I'd probably go with a simple extract based recipe with a wheat dme/lme, some kind of additional grain for flavor and depth, go with a light hop, and a yeast that either complients persimmons or has a clean taste. I'd probably put 1-3 lbs of persimmons in secondary.

Any suggestions?

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Old 01-05-2015, 09:32 PM   #8
coffearobusta42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by myerstyson View Post
Reviving this old thread after I saw this article today about persimmon beer: http://news.yahoo.com/virginia-brewe...124528366.html
Found the actual recipe for the 300-year old Virginia recipe here:
http://www.richmond.com/food-drink/a...dc50fdf4d.html

Apparently written by an 11-year old girl named Jane...
"Take a tub with a fals bottom, and fill it up with percimmons, and warm water, mas'd together Just thin enough to drop like Molasses, it will be two or three days a -- dropping then put some of it into water, with hops according to the strength you -- woall have it, and boile it well, then work it with yest."

 
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Old 01-05-2015, 09:55 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coffearobusta42 View Post
The OP's recipe reminds me of this 1913 one:
http://www.foodreference.com/html/pers-beer-12907.html
and they both harken back to the original Sumerian recipe for beer, where a grain was baked into biscuits for making wort.

I suspect the persimmons in these recipes are used primarily for sugar content. Persimmons have a delicate flavor and are extremely sweet. I'm not sure how much of that flavor would come through after baking and fermenting.

There are two basic types of persimmons in this world: those that are firm when ripe (e.g. fuyu), and those that are very soft when ripe (e.g. hachiya). The soft variety are horribly astringent when firm. They are basically eaten after they turn into goo on the inside. The soft persimmons lend themselves to baking, puddings, and sauces where they add sweetness and moisture. They tend to be made into desserts with spices like cinnamon and nutmeg, probably becuase they are available around the holidays. Persimmons are also made into wine. I got some going right now.
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f25/pers...ml#post6548091

I've been thinking about making a wheat style beer with persimmons for flavor. I'd probably go with a simple extract based recipe with a wheat dme/lme, some kind of additional grain for flavor and depth, go with a light hop, and a yeast that either complients persimmons or has a clean taste. I'd probably put 1-3 lbs of persimmons in secondary.

Any suggestions?
It seems that the grain isn't really serving any purpose? It's not being converted is it? Maybe it's there for body?
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Old 01-07-2015, 02:07 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by estricklin View Post
It seems that the grain isn't really serving any purpose? It's not being converted is it? Maybe it's there for body?
Cooking starchy foods breaks them down into simple sugars. Euell Gibbons recipe, the 1913 recipe, and the Sumarian recipe all baked their grains, converting them at least a little.

 
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