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Old 06-08-2009, 09:28 AM   #1
gregbathurst
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Seeing as jerusalem artichokes are an american native I thought this an appropriate forum to ask this question. I have read that jerusalem artichokes can be fermented into beer/wine/spirits. The main carbohydrate is a sugar called inulin which is supposed to need special yeasts. Has anyone ever heard of fermenting this? They grow like a weed at my place so it would be easy to get enough for a batch next winter. I plan on processing them the same way I do apples, then fermenting to see what happens (next winter which will be 12 mnths). Any input would be appreciated.

 
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Old 06-08-2009, 09:34 AM   #2
EoinMag
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Jack Keller knows all

winemaking: requested recipes (Jerusalem Artichoke Wine)

 
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Old 06-08-2009, 10:17 AM   #3
hopdog
 
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Let us know how the wine turns out. I have millions of those things.

 
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Old 06-08-2009, 10:52 AM   #4
gregbathurst
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That jack keller recipe is interesting but I am looking to try fermenting the actual juice from the artichokes, which is quite high in sugar but not easy to ferment. I am interested to find out what the flavour is without additives. If its no good I can try adding stuff.

 
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Old 06-10-2009, 12:48 AM   #5
gregbathurst
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I found this recipe on the google.

The stalk must be cut above the tubers immediately before the plant flowers to retain all of the sugar in the stalk; the stalk is then ground in a hammermill to release the sugars from the central cylinder, the pith, the ligneous cells, and to a small amount from the bark; the sugar juices from the hammermill are collected; the remaining mass of the central cylinder, pith, ligneous cells and bark is squeezed to remove the remaining sugar juices; the entire collected sugar juice is then processed by 1) bringing the pH to 4.0-4.5, 2) heating to 80-82 F., 3) adding yeast, 4) fermenting for approximately 24 hours. The method produces the maximum quantity of high grade ethanol per acre of plant of any known plant source, permitting the leaves to be used to return a high nitrogen content of the soil, the ground stalk mass to provide protein as an animal food, and the tubers to provide human or animal foods. The method for the first time uses the entire Jerusalem Artichoke while providing the maximum amount of ethanol as a worldwide energy source by the least costly, least complicated, and most energy efficient process.

This sounds quite promising. I will have to grow a patch next year for the stalks. Instead of a hammer mill I will use my usual method of milling in the mulcher and pressing with the cider press. There is no mention of the SG but something equal to beer, or better, would be good.


 
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Old 06-10-2009, 09:41 AM   #6
EoinMag
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Hmm that'll make something that can be used to make gasohol, are you sure you want to drink that?

 
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Old 06-10-2009, 10:40 PM   #7
brewthunda
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EoinMag View Post
Hmm that'll make something that can be used to make gasohol, are you sure you want to drink that?
Isn't that the point of this website?

 
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Old 06-11-2009, 12:19 AM   #8
gregbathurst
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brewthunda View Post
Isn't that the point of this website?
Yeah, I'm up for anything in the name of science. a few bottles of fizzy rocket juice would be OK. You never know it might taste quite nice if fermented a bit slower and aged a bit.

 
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Old 06-11-2009, 08:22 PM   #9
EoinMag
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No what I mean is that recipe looks like a fuel source recipe not something you'd necessarily want to drink.

Quote:
The method for the first time uses the entire Jerusalem Artichoke while providing the maximum amount of ethanol as a worldwide energy source by the least costly, least complicated, and most energy efficient process.

 
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Old 06-11-2009, 10:08 PM   #10
gregbathurst
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Yes you're right, but fuel ethanol and booze are exactly the same, its only the use (or misuse) that differs.
I'm going to try fermenting both the stems and the tubers, and the final drink may be a blend of the two. It may require additives or blending with cider or wine to make a good drink, I think it will be interesting to experiment with.

 
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