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Old 06-08-2009, 12:31 AM   #1
SkiGladys
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Default Force Carbonation at Altitude?

I swear I read this somewhere, but I can't find it with the search function.

Does anyone know what adjustment to pressure I need to make to force carbonate my kegs at altitude?

I live at 6,000 ft. in Golden, Colorado. If I remember correct, I am supposed to increase my PSI from the normal charts in order to get the correct volume of carbonation. I just don't remember how much. Thanks!
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Old 06-08-2009, 12:51 AM   #2
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I really don't think you need to change the pressure during carbonating. It's possible that you'll have to serve at a slightly lower pressure in order to achieve a balanced pour.
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Old 06-08-2009, 12:53 AM   #3
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What Yuri said... the altitude wont affect what is happening in the keg, that is a closed system. BUT, CO2 will more readily leave solution at higher elevations when removed from the pressurized vessel.
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Old 06-08-2009, 01:10 AM   #4
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SkiGladys:

Welcome to HBT! I'm in northwest Littleton, at about the same altitude as Golden. I haven't found the need to adjust settings for carbonation. Given that each kegging rig is slightly different, I'd say start with the 'standard' charts, and adjust up or down to your preference. I'm not sure that I could readily tell the difference between 3 and 3.25 volumes of CO2 without a side-by-side sampling, and even then, I don't know if I could tell.
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Old 06-08-2009, 10:52 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Pol View Post
BUT, CO2 will more readily leave solution at higher elevations when removed from the pressurized vessel.
Which means that once poured you need to drink faster...
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Old 06-08-2009, 12:46 PM   #6
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Wait, do belches at those altitudes come out with more force than at sea level? I mean, the CO2 would come out of solution more readily, right?
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Old 06-08-2009, 11:53 PM   #7
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Thanks guys. Like I said, I know I read it somewhere, but of course you can't believe everything you read on the internet.

I will rememeber, that I need to drink faster at altitude to keep my beer from going flat, and belch more often to avoid explosive gastric distress.
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Old 01-11-2015, 05:12 AM   #8
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Default add 1 PSI per 2000 feet elevation gain

Dredging up old post, but I was looking for this answer as well as I am at 6500 ft.

Here: http://www.winning-homebrew.com/supp...ationchart.pdf

and here: http://www.draughtquality.org/wp-con...PH-Final_1.pdf

say add 1 PSI per 2000 feet when carbonating kegs.

the answer I haven't found yet: Do you use the chart value for a given carb level, or the chart value + elevation correction when calculating line length from keg to tap?
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Old 01-11-2015, 05:37 AM   #9
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Adding 1 psi per 2000 feet to the carb chart value is a good rule of thumb for carbonation. Just rederived it from basic data (mostly so I would believe it.) It's not exact, but close enough for our purposes. You want to use the actual CO2 gauge pressure to figure line length, which means you'll need about 1 extra foot for each 2000 ft of altitude. Gauge pressure is pressure above local atmospheric pressure, and you want the pressure drop in the serving line to just about match the gauge pressure, so that as the beer exits the tap its pressure is close to ambient.

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Reason: typo
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Old 01-11-2015, 06:10 AM   #10
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I'm at 7k' feet and end up adding around 4psi on top of the standard volume/psi/temp chart.

I read an interesting article on the phenomenon from keg connection I believe. To me, it appears to be real and I compensate for it.
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