Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > Carbonation
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 05-28-2009, 09:57 PM   #1
Tuzlo
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 68
Default Carbonation

I currently run 2 carbonation systems when making/dispensing my beer.

I mass carbonate 3-4 Corny's at a time at room temp, using a Gas manifold I fabricated . Temps are about 14 degrees Celcius. CO2 pressure on this system is around 20 PSI.

When I put a Corny in a Keg, I relieve the pressure and hook up to the fridge system which is around 8 PSI and fridge temps are about 2-5 degrees celcius.

I seem to not get as much carbonation as commercial beer or even the size of the Bubble. Are my pressures too low? What should I do?
Tuzlo is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2009, 10:05 PM   #2
McKBrew
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
McKBrew's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Hayden, Idaho
Posts: 8,291
Liked 34 Times on 30 Posts
Likes Given: 8

Default

How long are you carbonating at room temperature?
__________________
Make Beer, Not War.
McKBrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2009, 10:11 PM   #3
Tuzlo
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 68
Default

2 weeks, minimum
Tuzlo is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2009, 08:53 PM   #4
Tuzlo
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 68
Default

Do I have the pressures right for the room temps?
Tuzlo is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2009, 09:55 PM   #5
Zen_Brew
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Zen_Brew's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Seattle
Posts: 1,922
Liked 23 Times on 23 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

There are pressure to temp calculators available on the internet.
Here is one at bottom of page.
Crockett Brewing Force Carbonation

Assuming you are going for say 2.4 volumes and your ambient temp of the keg is 70 deg F, it looks like you should be at about 27psi on your gas. Adjust for your actual temp.

Looks like space is a concern for you, but your carbonating would be a lot more efficient if you could cool the kegs down, even maybe in a basement or something. Can save you on CO2 costs.

edit: Actually just noticed you said your temps are about 14C, which is about 57F. If that is correct than your 20psi is about correct. You could bump it a few psi and see if that gets you what you are loking for.

Your CO2 level in the fridge looks a bit low though. Assuming an average temp of say 3 deg C you should still be up around 10psi if you are looking for 2.4 volumes

The type of beer you are drinking, and the length and diameter of dispensing line come into play as well.
__________________
Primary: German Hef, Belgian IPA, Scottish 80, Belgian Dubbel
On Tap: Oatmeal Stout, Vanilla Oatmeal Stout, Belgian Dark Strong, Munich Dunkel, Dunkel Weizen, Oktoberfest, Bock, IPA, Black IPA, English IPA, Pale Ale

Using the mind to look for reality is delusion. Using your senses to look for reality is awareness.

"One time I was so desperate for a beer I snuck into the football stadium and ate the dirt under the bleachers." Homer Simpson

Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Hoppiness

Reason: additional info
Zen_Brew is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2009, 11:00 PM   #6
Tuzlo
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 68
Default

Fridge pressure has been adjusted to 10 PSI and the pressure on the system outside the room is up to 24 now. How much will hose length and dia affect pressure, taking into account I have my tank hooked to a Gas manifold that distributes CO2 to 4 Corny's at once. Not sure if I should be bumping the pressure up based on this.
Tuzlo is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 05-30-2009, 12:23 AM   #7
Zen_Brew
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Zen_Brew's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Seattle
Posts: 1,922
Liked 23 Times on 23 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

Hi Tuzlo:

The hose diameter and length is more relative to when you have the beer on tap. Basically you encounter resistance in the line out from the keg to the tap and must make some adjustments in your psi when running longer lines due to line resistance. I don't think that comes into play when carbonating. For just a run from the keg to the tap most people use somewhere in the 5-8ft area of beer line.

Give the beer in the fridge a couple days to absorb the new carb level and see if it is acceptable to you. 10 psi was just a base point for you approximate temp and assuming 2.4 volumes of co2. (your carbonation preferences may vary) As I said based on the type of beer as well you may wish to make further adjustments. At the temp you are dispensing at I would think somewhere in the 10-12 psi level will get you up to the carbonation level you are looking for. Give the 10 psi a shot for a couple days.
__________________
Primary: German Hef, Belgian IPA, Scottish 80, Belgian Dubbel
On Tap: Oatmeal Stout, Vanilla Oatmeal Stout, Belgian Dark Strong, Munich Dunkel, Dunkel Weizen, Oktoberfest, Bock, IPA, Black IPA, English IPA, Pale Ale

Using the mind to look for reality is delusion. Using your senses to look for reality is awareness.

"One time I was so desperate for a beer I snuck into the football stadium and ate the dirt under the bleachers." Homer Simpson

Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Hoppiness
Zen_Brew is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Just ordered a carbonation stone. Carbonation in 20 minutes??? Any good? Mike-H General Techniques 26 10-15-2013 01:26 AM
Too much carbonation zacster Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 8 05-23-2008 02:28 AM
12 out of 55 have no carbonation. HELP dexter_craig Bottling/Kegging 5 02-14-2008 03:19 PM
low carbonation... bobwantbeer Bottling/Kegging 4 02-05-2008 04:28 PM
Too much carbonation icu812 Bottling/Kegging 2 01-22-2008 01:52 PM


Forum Jump

Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS