Coldbreak Brewing Giveaway - Winners Drawn!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Beginners Beer Brewing Forum > How much difference would this make?
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 05-21-2009, 03:59 PM   #1
brewnscooter
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Western NY
Posts: 35
Default How much difference would this make?

I posted a thread a while ago regarding my second attemp ever at doing an extract batch (my first was a very successful American Amber). It is a "Brewer's Best Kolsch" kit. I thought that I would change up the included Nottingham yeast with a WLP029 Kolsch yeast. I still think that I might, but I was just wondering as a noob doing my 2nd batch ever, how much difference I would really be able to notice and if it's really worth the effort. I'm sure most of you seasoned veterans would notice a difference but do you think I will? I guess what I'm asking is, would this be a drastic change or a subtle change?


brewnscooter is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2009, 04:07 PM   #2
SchizoFilly
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Burleson, TX
Posts: 970
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

If you had brewed this particular recipe several times before and were changing a single factor like yeast strain, it would be an interesting experiment. As it is, you're asking how much difference it will make when you have nothing to compare the difference against. I would not bother stepping up to the expense of liquid on batch number two, and some don't bother with liquid yeast ever. There is no problem with the dry yeast, just not as many varietals.


__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by shecky View Post
There is shamelessness and then there is SchizoFilly.
SchizoFilly is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2009, 04:52 PM   #3
KayaBrew
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Jay, Adirondack Mountains, NY
Posts: 2,206
Liked 132 Times on 114 Posts
Likes Given: 112

Default

I was just thinking, as I was pitching some Notty into a Simcoe IPA I just brewed...I wish someone had discouraged me from wasting time and money on liquid yeasts when I was still a noob. Although I've brewed 100 or so gallons since the New Year, I guess I still consider myself a noob. That being said, IMHO, unless you are brewing a particular style of beer that calls for a particular yeast ie. Hefe's, Belgians, Lagers etc, etc, save yourself some aggrivation and some money and just go with dry yeast. S-05, S-04, and Nottingham are all superb dry yeasts. No starters, no smack packs, no mess. I'm sure I'll get flamed for this, but again, it's just my opinion. All I brew now are Pale's and IPAs. That's what I like to drink. I keep no less than 6 packets of Notty or S-05 in the fridge at all times. Just my 2 cents.
__________________
"...Careful, man...there's a beverage here!..."
KayaBrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2009, 05:01 PM   #4
Arkador
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 1,724
Liked 15 Times on 14 Posts
Likes Given: 10

Default

Nottingham seems to work with ALOT of styles....

As to experimenting, I have 1 recipe I have tried several ways, Each time I take the original recipe and change 1 thing, then make notes in my logbook when it is drinking time.
Arkador is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2009, 05:05 PM   #5
Belmont
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Spring, TX
Posts: 247
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts

Default

They are right about there being nothing wrong with dry yeast and I wish I hadn't listened to the first person that told me that liquid yeast was superior. I use dry yeast every time I can to make the beer that I want. That said, there are reasons for using liquid yeast. There are only certain strains available in dry form. I don't think there are any dry Belgian yeasts for example. I think a good wheat beer yeast has only recently showed up. You would likely make a great Kolsch with one of the top dry yeasts. The Kolsch yeast that the liquid yeast manufacturers sell is just a specific strain that is used by a few of the top breweries of that style so it would get you closer to matching their recipe if you were trying to clone. There's no doubt that you can get a significantly different beer using all of the same ingredients and just changing the yeast. If this is just your second batch I'd definitely stick with the dry yeast that the kit came with though. The dry yeasts are just so reliable and for a new brewer its best to eliminate as many variables as possible. You have no idea how long the Kolsch yeast has been sitting at your LHBS for instance. I know I've gotten bad/old liquid yeasts before. Stick to the dry yeast on this batch and experiment with various yeasts after you have your process down and want to fine tune a specific recipe.
Belmont is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2009, 05:12 PM   #6
Minky
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Ashland, Ohio
Posts: 277
Liked 46 Times on 34 Posts
Likes Given: 69

Default

Safale's US-05 dry yeast has been my favorite yeast for quite some time now for just about any ale I brew.

I haven't tried it yet, but I do believe it would even make a killer Kolsch.
Minky is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2009, 05:38 PM   #7
Zenman
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Posts: 114
Default

I've done that Kolsch kit and it turns out fine with the Dry yeast. With that said the one I plan on brewing in the beginning of June, I've opted to go with the Liquid. Just to change things up. Until recently I only used dry with great results, but when i created my bloody hefe recipie went with liquid american wheat strain. I'm so happy with the results I'm going to experiment more with the liquid yeasts. But the dry does a fine job go with your gut, either way you'll learn and have fun
__________________
Zenman
Phoenix, AZ
Primary -
Primary -
Primary -
On Deck - Bloody Hefe
Conditioning -
Drinking - Raison D'Zen, Pale Ale
Zenman is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2009, 05:47 PM   #8
Edcculus
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Greenville, SC
Posts: 4,567
Liked 43 Times on 40 Posts

Default

You will see a difference. Fermenting WLP029 at 60-62*F, then lagering for a few weeks will produce a much cleaner beer than using Nottingham. Honestly, I don't think you can consider it a Kolsch if you don't use Kolsch or Alt yeast.
Edcculus is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2009, 09:01 PM   #9
brewon
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Port St Lucie, Florida
Posts: 10
Default

First off I'll stand out and say liquid yeasts are superior to dry. However!, that doesn't mean dry yeast sucks. If you want to use liquid yeast, go ahead. Will you know the difference? Maybe, probably not. As long as you have something drinkable, its all good. The best part about brewing at home is doing what you want, not what someone else does.
brewon is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 05-21-2009, 09:13 PM   #10
brewnscooter
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Western NY
Posts: 35
Default

To sidetrack a bit, let me ask this, For the people that advocate the dry, do you pitch it dry or rehydrate?


brewnscooter is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Would it make a difference? CaliBuddha Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 13 11-03-2009 01:22 AM
How much difference will this make on the OG OHIOSTEVE Wine Making Forum 10 10-13-2009 11:53 AM
Does it make any difference Rob1352 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 6 10-02-2008 02:54 AM
Hops make a difference WBC All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 1 10-10-2007 11:44 PM
Wow the crush DOES make a difference FSR402 All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 8 08-13-2007 05:44 PM


Forum Jump

Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS