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Old 05-19-2009, 01:13 AM   #21
WortMonger
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Well, just checked on the plants and everything is yellowing. I am not happy, but I do know not enough time has passed for significant bacterial growth. It could be transplant shock, but I also didn't introduce the plants gradually into the direct sun either so.... The hops (now two) didn't have any buds on them, but were pretty thick. When they arrived, they looked kind of rotten on the ends. I cut off the rot and planted them as deep as I could get them, but at a 30-45* angle up. Regardless of what happens, I will keep plugging away with plants.

Edit: Yep, need more plants, lol!!!
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Old 05-20-2009, 07:36 AM   #22
scinerd3000
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i know aquarium stores sell bacteria to dump in new fishtanks...i believe petco has them- you could always try dumping it into the tank?
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Old 05-21-2009, 11:34 AM   #23
doubleb
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This looks very cool Wortmonger. One question, when growing season is over and it starts getting colder, what do you do with the worms and fish?
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Old 05-21-2009, 06:18 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scinerd3000
i know aquarium stores sell bacteria to dump in new fishtanks...i believe petco has them- you could always try dumping it into the tank?
Thanks for the heads-up. I might have to give them a try.

Quote:
Originally Posted by doubleb
This looks very cool Wortmonger. One question, when growing season is over and it starts getting colder, what do you do with the worms and fish?
Thank you very much, it is a work in progress for sure. Way, way, way fun though!

Who says the grow season has to be over? I'm thinking up some ways to experiment with winter crops and maybe fill it with winter barley or rye (rye is an excellent nitrate remover). The fish will slow down eating but will not freeze. Wish I knew what veggies could possibly grow in cold.

I'm not worried about freezing, as the fish/roots/worms will be warm enough from the black fish tank recirculating the warmer water. I was even thinking of wrapping the white PVC tubes with black masking, for more heat production in the really cold season.

If the need to harvest the worms warrants it, I could through placement of a new worm bed in each grow-tube. Worm bed meaning: a new place for them to come and eat "better/more diverse food" than what they had been eating. The great thing about vermiculture bed systems, is that they tend to fit one-on-the-other and all have drain holes on the bottom... so you can just set them in the gravel and fill them with food. The worms come up and eat, slowly beginning to occupy the new bed. Two weeks would be all I would need to get most of the worms out of the grow beds. Then I would just put them in my dry-based worm bed (made from a tower of stacked containers, or go fishing. Regardless, I will have worms for next year via my dry-based vermiculture bed.

Update!!!
I'm down to one tomato, and a few peppers. Only one pepper plant looks un-phased. Like I said, expected under the circumstances. I will buy and plant immediately!
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Old 05-21-2009, 07:50 PM   #25
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One other thing I am working on that I could use some help, just in case one of you is more knowledgeable .


I am wondering if either one of these ideas will help my pump increase flow? It is called a geyser pump, and supposedly pulses water at a higher volume than regular airlift pumps are capable of. Suggestions?
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Old 05-22-2009, 05:09 AM   #26
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wort,,
not sure how those are supposed to work so i can't comment on the efficiency or lack thereof of either design. wouldn't it be easier to buy a pump like this Smartpond at Lowe's: 100-155 GPH Submersible Fountain Pond Pump rather than dink around with internet designs?
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Old 05-22-2009, 06:22 PM   #27
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I have never seen a geyser pump so take my thoughts with a grain of salt. As I understand the pumps they accumulate a large volume of air at the bottom of the standpipe and "burp" it into the pipe. This big bubble rapidly rises pushing the water above out and also creates a suction drawing water in from below.

Pump on left: All the extra pipe seems to be doing is adding extra pipe length. I am not sure what benefit the pipe length offers.

The pump on the right might work. It is certainly cheap and easy to make so you might as well try it.

The designs I saw online seem to use two cups instead of tubing. I'm not sure if it is an important detail. Perhaps the cup allow a larger volume of air to flow quickly without the restriction and limited volume of a pipe.
This is the only picture I could find of the internals of a geyser pump. There seems to be some intentional misinformation in the diagrams I found online. I imagine the manufacturers are trying to conceal a really simple design that anyone could build.

 
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Old 05-23-2009, 03:08 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eriktlupus View Post
wort,,
not sure how those are supposed to work so i can't comment on the efficiency or lack thereof of either design. wouldn't it be easier to buy a pump like this Smartpond at Lowe's: 100-155 GPH Submersible Fountain Pond Pump rather than dink around with internet designs?
I was with you on the whole "why a airlift pump", until I realized the benefits of no moving parts and larger open spaces in the pump mechanisms. When you are dealing with pond scum, you are going to clog a regular pump eventually. In this system a clogged pump = dead fish. I have a nice one I bought for my icewater bath chiller that I might use if all else fails, but the airlift is lifting stuff from the bottom and leaving it in the grow-beds. I just need a little more ummph out of it is all.

[quote=pilotdane]I have never seen a geyser pump so take my thoughts with a grain of salt. As I understand the pumps they accumulate a large volume of air at the bottom of the standpipe and "burp" it into the pipe. This big bubble rapidly rises pushing the water above out and also creates a suction drawing water in from below.

Pump on left: All the extra pipe seems to be doing is adding extra pipe length. I am not sure what benefit the pipe length offers.

The pump on the right might work. It is certainly cheap and easy to make so you might as well try it.

The designs I saw online seem to use two cups instead of tubing. I'm not sure if it is an important detail. Perhaps the cup allow a larger volume of air to flow quickly without the restriction and limited volume of a pipe.
This is the only picture I could find of the internals of a geyser pump. There seems to be some intentional misinformation in the diagrams I found online. I imagine the manufacturers are trying to conceal a really simple design that anyone could build.[/qoute]

Thanks for the picture of the geyser pump. I haven't seen that one yet. The one I saw was, as you said, two cups with a exit tube going through both. The other one I saw had a single outside cub and inside was a U-shaped tube, like a P-trap. As the air pushes the water out of the outside cup, it is also pushing water down and then back up the "U" until the waterline is to the bottom of the U. Then the air rushes up the "inside the exit tube" part of the U and allows a larger amount of air behind the water. I was trying to accomplish the U-type of setup with drawing "A." With all the additional pipework I figured it would provide the same resistance as the U-type design I saw, as well as allow the air to enter the exit pipe lower than the U-type drawing I saw. In the U-type, the end of both "U's" were very high, one at the near top of the outside container and the other end the same hieght only insed the drain pipe. I now think drawing "B" would be a waste, but I will try it first, as it is basically the initial construction of "A."

Thanks for your input guys, makes me think and re-think so I'm happy. Keep it coming!
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Old 05-24-2009, 04:10 AM   #29
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since your worried about particle matter (chunks) why not use a sewage pump($130-300) or use a pump from a dishwasher(@35). the dishwasher should be able to handle the algae and fish crap or any small fish that get sucked in for that matter. you'd just have to have a bottom line outside of your tank, look for a bilge pump thru-wall kit for this.


dish pump:Amazon.com: Dishwasher Drain Pump Assembly - 154407401: Home & Garden

bilge kit: Cabela's -- Bilge Pump Plumbing Kit
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Old 05-25-2009, 04:52 PM   #30
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