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Old 06-21-2009, 03:40 PM   #11
eschatz
 
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They're so cheap I don't know why you'd even bother. However if you do, I'd assume that they would be vessels for the previous yeast/brett/bacteria whatever. You might want to use some caution and maybe boil them. I don't know how much flavor you'd get out of those.
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Old 06-23-2009, 03:56 PM   #12
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Nice compilation

 
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Old 06-29-2009, 03:33 PM   #13
trefoyl
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I don't know if barrel aging is for me, but I was on the grounds of the Pennsylvania Renaissance Faire this past weekend and saw a tent for Thousand Oaks Barrel Co. Link:Thousand Oaks Barrel Co.*-*1000 Oaks Barrel Co.
They will be there all summer and have other locations as well and also sell over the internet. Prices seem quite reasonable and they have many sizes, 1 liter to 5 gallons.

I also found a website describing one homebrewer's experiments:Oak Barrel Experiment

 
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Old 06-29-2009, 09:08 PM   #14
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Thanks for the info. It's been added to the OP.
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Old 07-01-2009, 12:26 AM   #15
sjlammer
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This should be stickied
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Old 07-01-2009, 12:42 AM   #16
Ferrousity
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Mar 2009
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This is a very useful and timely thread.

Not too long ago folks from my local club brewed a Belgian dark strong that was then aged in the club bourbon barrels. Yep....its tasty

I am about to attempt to approximate this with my own batch and some oak chips. I just bought some today (LD Carlson brand), however, which do not indicate a specific origin, or that they are toasted at all.

so, is there an un-toasted variety? should I toast them myself?

I'm thinking more toasty is maybe better for such a big dark beer.

thoughts?
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Old 07-01-2009, 03:24 AM   #17
eschatz
 
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I have know idea what LD carlson is doing with that. You need to know what intensity of toast and what country of origin you are using. I don't believe that Carlson would give you untoasted oak. Then again, these are the same people that have no level of intensity or origin. Morebeer.com should have better supplies. Check there. Oak is cheap and you want the best for a big beer. You don't want to mess it up.

As far as high toast goes. This is from the OP ,"Heavier toasts create maliards and charring, also confectionary compounds (custard/caramel/butterscotch flavors)".

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Old 07-01-2009, 04:19 PM   #18
trefoyl
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Link: http://www.oakbarrelsltd.com/
The company advertising at the top of this thread offers lower prices than Thousand Oaks, but does not have locations at various events so shipping has to be added to the cost.
Three things that strike me as interesting about barrel aging:
1. Aging time is greatly reduced in a small barrel due to increased surface area, and small barrels would also be more convenient for a homebrewer and allow for blending from multiple barrels if desired. Not many people would have room for multiple large barrels.
2. Smaller barrels would lose flavor more quickly and become neutral, not necessarily a bad thing if making brett beers like lambics.
3. Barrel aging offers oxidation characteristics and more complex flavor opportunities than chips alone.
It's tempting ... perhaps in the future I will pick up a couple of small barrels, maybe around 1 liter, to experiment with.

 
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Old 07-01-2009, 04:37 PM   #19
eschatz
 
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Thanks for help. I've added some of your info and added your link.
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Old 07-01-2009, 09:56 PM   #20
dwarven_stout
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Quote:
Brett (and other sour critters) can live in wood (takes a long time to become problematic)
I beg to differ, good sir. Sour bugs in my wood are "problematic" as soon as they are noticed.

Thanks for the info! I'm going to be oaking soon.

 
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