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Old 05-04-2009, 02:12 PM   #1
WriterWriter
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Sep 2008
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Guys got a problem.

I bought myself one of them fancy "bread pans" so as to get a proper loaf shape. Whenever making bread just on a flat surface I get a great-tasting product, but it's not shaped like a sandwich loaf.

However, the bread doesn't seem to rise much in the pan. I'm using enough flour/water/yeast and letting it rise an hour before punching down (I do this twice) but it never rises pre-oven more than a little bit. More kneading? Less kneading? Bueller?

Thanks!
WW



 
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Old 05-04-2009, 02:56 PM   #2
anemic
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Feb 2009
Grand Rapids, MI
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mate you need to go here: The Fresh Loaf | News & Information for Amateur Bakers and Artisan Bread Enthusiasts

its like HBT for bread bakers

my hunch is you need to allow more time for the bulk fermentation, and also the in-the-pan fermentation/rise (secondary!). I have found the instructions represent the bare minimum time, and there is no penalty for longer - even much longer (2x).

Got it warm enough?



 
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Old 05-05-2009, 05:00 AM   #3
Tsuyako
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spoke to baker in the family, she says either you are using rapid rise yeast (evil) or you are using regular bakers yeast but the water you start it in is to hot and killing the yeast or atleast retarding it.

 
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Old 05-05-2009, 05:08 AM   #4
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I just rise once and then proof in the loaf pans one time and bake.

In 35 years I don't think I have ever punched a dough down 2x unless I was going to stick it in the fridge and try to delay baking a few days.

Just M2c.

 
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Old 05-05-2009, 12:24 PM   #5
FilJos
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Are you using a leavening agent? If so, remember that baking SODA is only single action, in that it reacts and causes rising when it gets wet. Baking POWDER on the other hand is dual action and reacts both when it gets wet and when it gets hot (in the oven). Or so I am told.
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Old 05-08-2009, 05:55 AM   #6
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Hi folks,

Thanks for all the replies and sorry about not answering quicker. New job in new country makes for busy times!

Thanks anemic for that link -- I will browse for sure this weekend.

Nah I'm not using quick-rising yeast, a leavening agent, or too-hot water. The only thing that I thought might be affecting it is this London indoor temperature -- cold! I think I'll try to place the bread in a warmer area and, as Poindexter said, just letting it rise once in the pan. Hey, 35 years of experience is definitely worth more than two cents.

Thanks again!
WW

 
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Old 05-08-2009, 07:17 PM   #7
Marquez
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I've learned that specific bread styles have specific proportions in their ingredients, and also kneading styles, leavening times, etc.

I was inspired to bake bread because I am seeking repeatability in my beer, and I figured this would be a way to practice.

My goal is to bake a ciabata 10 times in a row, same time every time.

I've yet to do it, despite working the recipe dozens of times. I do it by hand, in my home kitchen, using common kitchen gear.

In my quest, I've learned that there are many many variables that when attended to will reduce variability. My loaves are more consistent, but I have not had the streak of 10 in a row.

My beer equivalent for repeatability is a California Common. It'll take longer to evaluate each batch, but definitely it'll be worth the wait.

Reason: removed web link 'cuz it was already mentioned

 
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Old 05-11-2009, 08:27 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FilJos View Post
Are you using a leavening agent? If so, remember that baking SODA is only single action, in that it reacts and causes rising when it gets wet. Baking POWDER on the other hand is dual action and reacts both when it gets wet and when it gets hot (in the oven). Or so I am told.
Baking soda is neither single acting nor double acting; it all depends on what acid(s) you mix it with. (Technically speaking, that is; in practice, it's almost always used as a single acting leavening agent.) Baking powder is just a convenient mixture of baking soda, acid, and starch. Double acting baking powder is double acting due to the particular acids it contains, but not all baking powder is double acting baking powder.
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Old 05-11-2009, 01:20 PM   #9
anemic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VFib View Post
...
My goal is to bake a ciabata 10 times in a row, same time every time.

I've yet to do it, ...
That bit of cleverness is a goal for a thinking baker. I wonder if your terroir is stronger than your technique, though solid your technique may be! Cheers



 
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