Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > General Techniques > Exploring "no chill" brewing
Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 08-02-2011, 10:18 PM   #1031
ghpeel
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Gainesville, FL
Posts: 1,216
Liked 22 Times on 20 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ettbeer View Post
curious if anyone has ever ran across any published reading material that is backed up by scientific research to say no chilling makes the same quality beer as chilling... .. yes you may not get infected, yes you make drinkable beer.. but is it truly the best beer you could have made? i think there's a lot of smoke being blown on this subject
While I respect your skepticism, those of us who No Chill are going to be a little off put by your insinuation that we're tricking ourselves into thinking we're making good beer . Please don't forget that No Chill brewing has been done by literally thousands of home brewers since it was developed a few years back on the Australian Brewing Scene. (Hell, down there you can even buy pre-made wort sealed in jugs.)

However, I feel the only way to "prove" that No Chill works is by posting BJCP-certified judges' scoresheets on beers we've done as No Chill. I'll go find the ones I can and post them later (I don't do too many beers in competitions though), and I encourage others to do the same.

I'll tell you straight up though, not only do I think No Chill isn't harmfull, I think it's downright HELPFUL for flavor in some beers. For example, I've started doing lager this year, and I've done 3 total (all No Chills). I'm able to get my No Chill cube down to perfect pitching temps (48-52F) before I open it to move the wort to a carboy. My 3 lagers have all come out perfectly clean, not a trace of DMS or Diacytl in any of them. There's no way I'll be struggling to get a batch down to 50F with my stupid hot Florida tap water (~70-75F).


__________________
=============================================

Kegged: Dunkelweizen
Primary: American Pale Ale
ghpeel is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-02-2011, 10:23 PM   #1032
Germelli1
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Blacksburg/Herndon, VA
Posts: 2,193
Liked 35 Times on 35 Posts
Likes Given: 19

Default

Wow, he has infected this thread as well.

To everyone else...To me, it is about saving water. I can't think of a bigger waste of water than using it to cool wort. Everything else is just a bonus...no sanatizing chillers or risk of infections from them, no dealing with pumps, etc,etc,etc. It is just easier and my beers are amazing and clear in a month


__________________
If I had 8 hours to chop down a tree, I would spend 6 sharpening my axe. ~Abe Lincoln
Germelli1 is offline
LVBen Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-02-2011, 10:26 PM   #1033
LVBen
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Las Vegas, NV
Posts: 1,345
Liked 21 Times on 21 Posts
Likes Given: 52

Default

I haven't posted in this thread yet, but I have to say that I LOVE no chill brewing!

I have a copper wort chiller, and I see it as a complete wast of money!

Luckily, I think I can turn it into a jockey box.
LVBen is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-02-2011, 10:33 PM   #1034
AZ_IPA
PKU
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
AZ_IPA's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: The Cold Part of AZ
Posts: 47,202
Liked 7073 Times on 5963 Posts
Likes Given: 1190

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Germelli1 View Post
Wow, he has infected this thread as well.
Probably because I linked this thread in the other thread.
AZ_IPA is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-03-2011, 12:24 PM   #1035
nutty_gnome
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
nutty_gnome's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Princeton, Nj
Posts: 1,252
Liked 87 Times on 70 Posts
Likes Given: 22

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ettbeer View Post
i didn't say there was anything wrong with doing it that way ever... i'm asking if any of this has been backed up by a credible source.. not everyone can have a 14 cu ft chest freezer. recirculating mash tun, whirlpool chillers with inline therminator.March pumps all over the place.. i understand that.. but people are claiming this has NO effect on their beer.. i think that's just simply not a true statement.. lets call a spade a spade here..
Nothing anyone writes on an internet board will ever be enough to convince everyone. Instead, I suggest you brew a cheap recipe using a basic no chill process and see for yourself. You don't even need a cube as has been mentioned so many times before. Then see for yourself how it goes and if you like it.
__________________
N_G
It could be worse.
nutty_gnome is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-03-2011, 11:57 PM   #1036
PickledFetus
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 19
Default

I must admit I haven't read the entire thread here, but I learned about no-chill brewing a few years ago on the aussiehomebrewer.com forum and did a couple of batches where I ran the hot wort directly into a corny keg, hit it with 60# of CO2 to seal it, and then let it cool down slowly on my balcony (I never tried it with a "cube" as they call it).

When I opened up the keg a day or two later to siphon it into my fermenter, I was hit with the most foul vegetal aroma I've ever smelled. It was awful, but I fermented it anyway. Turns out the fermentation scrubbed almost all of the nasty aromas out of the beer. I say "almost" all because even in the finished beer, I could still detect it. I took a few bottles to my local homebrew club meeting without telling anyone what I did, and a bunch of people noticed the same thing and asked me if I had any problems chilling down the wort fast enough. It wasn't undrinkable and I think if it were a more robust style you wouldn't have been able to notice it (I did a blonde ale, specifically so that I would be able to detect any off-flavors), but it was there.

I haven't done a no-chill batch since those two experiments. I would absolutely love for it to work since it is really convenient, but unfortunately it really did result in off-flavors for me. Its very bizarre because many people will claim to be brewing light, delicate styles with absolutely no trace of DMS and even winning awards. I can only speculate that perhaps differing ingredients have an effect, or maybe these people are in fact inadvertently chilling a bit (maybe to just under ~180-190) before dumping in the cube, while I was racking it to the corny 30 seconds after flameout. I think it deserves a lot more experimentation and maybe eventually the homebrewing community will have a better understanding of what causes DMS rather than just saying "chill faster". But until then, I'm sticking to my immersion chiller (also, moving to a climate where my tap water is ~50F instead of 95F makes a big difference!).
PickledFetus is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2011, 12:13 AM   #1037
ghpeel
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Gainesville, FL
Posts: 1,216
Liked 22 Times on 20 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

PickledFetus I think your problem was the keg. Maybe there was some bit of crud right under your keg lid. Did you roll the keg around and turn it upside down after you poured the wort in? I would assume that would be necessary in order to pasteurize the whole keg.

I do No Chill in the plastic cube, and have just finished 3 lagers this year, including an American Pilsner, all of which had no DMS at all.
__________________
=============================================

Kegged: Dunkelweizen
Primary: American Pale Ale
ghpeel is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2011, 02:03 AM   #1038
eulipion2
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
eulipion2's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Hawley, PA
Posts: 1,555
Liked 66 Times on 53 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by PickledFetus View Post
(I did a blonde ale, specifically so that I would be able to detect any off-flavors)
I did a blonde as well, which also came out with a bit of Band-Aid, and while I couldn't pick it out, another BJCP judge said he got a cooked veggie flavor. That said, I had some procedural issues. I opened the cube to squeeze out more air, thus exposing it to the elements, then left it in the cube for a week. In addition, it was very low hopped.

Next time I'll only open the cube to rack and pitch yeast. I'll probably up the hops a bit, too. For other batches, I've done an IPA that got the feedback "I'd buy that," and an American Wheat with similar sentiments. Just kegged a wit that was pretty spot on, if maybe a little green. I've done some other no-chill batches that have turned out pretty good, but those ones really shined.

Give it another go. As with any other brewing method, check your process, be anal retentive about sanitation, and if it helps you sleep at night, mash a little longer, boil a little longer, and hop just a little more.
__________________

Primary: Neo-1 APA (homegrown); Sterling Patersbier (homegrown)

Kegged: Belma Session IPA; Ordinary Bitter; Session Blonde; Rauchbier; Fir tip Maibock; Avery Hog Heaven clone; Brewpastor's Dark Night of the Soul; Perry;

Bottled: Mosaic Session Brett, French Saison; Smoked Wit; Quad; Tripel; Saison Americain; Coffee Saison; Session Saison; Bacon488's Mild
eulipion2 is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2011, 02:49 AM   #1039
jeffmeh
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
jeffmeh's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 2,021
Liked 180 Times on 153 Posts
Likes Given: 24

Default

I have no-chilled Kolsches and very Pale Ales (among others), and never had an off-flavor. I do let it cool to 190F before draining into the Winpak.
jeffmeh is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2011, 03:14 AM   #1040
PickledFetus
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 19
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ghpeel View Post
PickledFetus I think your problem was the keg. Maybe there was some bit of crud right under your keg lid. Did you roll the keg around and turn it upside down after you poured the wort in? I would assume that would be necessary in order to pasteurize the whole keg.

I do No Chill in the plastic cube, and have just finished 3 lagers this year, including an American Pilsner, all of which had no DMS at all.
Its possible I suppose, I just don't see it being likely. I *did* turn the keg upside down for 5-10 minutes after pressurizing it, and this was after disassembling the entire keg and soaking it all in star-san. I tasted the wort before pitching the yeast and besides the vegetal flavor and aroma, it didn't taste infected. It was still very sweet, no sourness or medicinal flavors.

And I don't want to overstate the flavor impact in the finished product. It WAS really pretty subtle. The fermentation scrubbed out much of what I tasted in the wort. In a porter, stout, or IPA I may not have noticed it. But it was still there, and I have a hard time ignoring things like that in my beer once I know its there

I may try it again as an experiment, but as I said, chilling my wort is no longer a pain point for me now that I'm no longer in California.


PickledFetus is offline
 
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
"American" or "Imperial" Oatmeal Stout Recipe: Critiques please! cladinshadows Recipes/Ingredients 4 01-04-2012 11:21 PM
Small Scale Commerical Brewing (600gal/mo) on "Beer Budget" GuateBrewer All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 5 11-02-2010 12:46 PM
"Video Surveillance on the Fly" or "Urine trouble now mister!" Tenchiro Debate Forum 1 05-23-2009 06:33 PM
NPR Fans: "The Science of Brewing" on Talk of the Nation tomorrow 2-3pm EDT tmoney1224 General Beer Discussion 37 05-21-2008 12:06 AM
Miller "Chill" casper0074 General Beer Discussion 5 09-30-2007 05:16 PM


Forum Jump

Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS