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Old 04-21-2009, 09:16 PM   #1
JumboBlimpJumbo
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So I just made a magnetic stir plate and I'm wondering should I bother aerating the wort if I'm pitching like a 750 or 1000 mL starter O.G. 1.040 that's been stirred with an aluminum foil airlock, or would that maybe oxidize my beer since I'm supposedly pitching an adequate amount of yeast?

I know the sticky on this board http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f13/agin...cussion-84005/ says
Quote:
Note that I've mentioned nothing about aeration. That's because I don't worry about it. I just pitch lots of healthy yeast so they won't have to reproduce much. It works...I promise.
so I'm sure I don't need to, but I guess it's just a theory question. Would it be beneficial/harmful one way or the other? (P.S. I'm not really sure how to use the quote function like everyone else, credit for that one goes to Yuri_Rage)

 
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Old 04-21-2009, 09:20 PM   #2
rsmith179
 
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The stirplate is taking care of the aeration of your starter wort. No need to pump any oxygen into the starter. Obviously, you'll still want to aerate your wort in the primary, but the stirplate will take care of everything you'll need regarding the starter.
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Old 04-22-2009, 12:21 AM   #3
steelerguy
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I would aerate that wort since it was boiled and there is not a lot of dissolved oxygen in there. Who cares if you oxidize the starter wort, just give it a shake (would waste pure 02). Just chill the starter and decant the oxidized wort off before pitching. I like decant the morning before I brew, let it sit for an hour or so to warm up, and add some more wort. By the time it is ready to pitch that yeast has woken up and is ready to go.

 
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Old 04-22-2009, 12:27 AM   #4
G-E-R-M-A-N
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I infused o2 into my starter, pitched and put it on the stirplate and let er run. Next day I had krausen overflow. I thought we were not supposed to see krausen when stirring with a stir bar.

 
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Old 04-22-2009, 12:40 AM   #5
steelerguy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by G-E-R-M-A-N View Post
I infused o2 into my starter, pitched and put it on the stirplate and let er run. Next day I had krausen overflow. I thought we were not supposed to see krausen when stirring with a stir bar.
I have never had a big krausen, the movement of the top and whirpool action pop the bubbles pretty well. I have had a very vigorous fermentation going with lots of C02 bubbling up and still very minimal krausen.

I suppose it would also depend on the DME used also.

 
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Old 04-22-2009, 12:44 AM   #6
Blender
 
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I either shake the starter vessel or put in a shot of O2 for my starters. I don't feel that it hurts anything.
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Old 04-22-2009, 02:01 AM   #7
JumboBlimpJumbo
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I think I wasn't very clear with my question.... from everything I have read, using the stirplate aerates the starter so that I have a huge increase in cell count so I reach the "ideal" pitching rate. What I am asking is, since I am pitching the ideal amount of yeast cells, should I aerate the wort that I'm pitching into, since I apparently already have enough yeast and they (maybe) don't need the oxygen to build new cell walls?

I'm getting my information from MB Raines, Ph.D. - Guide to Yeast Culturing for Homebrewers - Maltose Falcons Home Brewing Society (Los Angeles Homebrewing) but I don't think that touched on the effects of aerating the wort that you are pitching into. Part of me thinks that this could end up oxidizing the beer or have some other negative effect, but then part of me is just accustomed to shaking the hell out of the wort to aerate it.

 
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Old 04-22-2009, 02:38 AM   #8
mykayel
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JumboBlimpJumbo View Post
since I apparently already have enough yeast and they (maybe) don't need the oxygen to build new cell walls?
... Part of me thinks that this could end up oxidizing the beer or have some other negative effect, but then part of me is just accustomed to shaking the hell out of the wort to aerate it.
You want all the oxygen you can get at the begining. You only worry about oxidation after fermentation is complete. If you pitch with the proper amount of yeast, you still want to airate (or use oxygen) your wort before you pitch your yeast. The yeast will still grow no matter if you under pitch, pitch properly, or over pitch.

 
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Old 04-22-2009, 02:51 AM   #9
Blender
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JumboBlimpJumbo View Post
I think I wasn't very clear with my question.... from everything I have read, using the stirplate aerates the starter so that I have a huge increase in cell count so I reach the "ideal" pitching rate. What I am asking is, since I am pitching the ideal amount of yeast cells, should I aerate the wort that I'm pitching into, since I apparently already have enough yeast and they (maybe) don't need the oxygen to build new cell walls?

I'm getting my information from MB Raines, Ph.D. - Guide to Yeast Culturing for Homebrewers - Maltose Falcons Home Brewing Society (Los Angeles Homebrewing) but I don't think that touched on the effects of aerating the wort that you are pitching into. Part of me thinks that this could end up oxidizing the beer or have some other negative effect, but then part of me is just accustomed to shaking the hell out of the wort to aerate it.
I suppose if you are sure that you have enough healthy yeast then aeration is not that important. Breweries pitch large quantities of yeast and if you believe that you have something in that range you may want to give it a shot. When we visited Stone brewery they told us the Pale Ale was done fermenting in 3 days and moved to a bright tank.
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Old 04-22-2009, 02:53 AM   #10
Lou
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ok, i don't know why people aren't answering your question....

your logic is sound. BUT the "optimal pitching rate" expects a few rounds of cell division by the yeast -- so while you are pitching the "optimal" amount, you still don't have all the cells you need to ferment the wort. aerate as usual without fear of oxidation. the yeast will happily eat the oxygen.

 
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